Henry C. Sutton - 76th NY Infantry

Civil War Letters of Henry C. Sutton

Compiled by B. Conrad Bush

Henry C. Sutton was 19 years of age when he enlisted, on the 20th of September 1861, at Pitcher, New York. He was mustered into the United States service as a private in Company B of the 76th New York Volunteer Infantry on the 4th of October 1861 to serve three years. He was killed in action, by a minnie ball through his head, on August 28, 1864 at the Battle for the Brawner Farm near Gainesville, Va. when Part of General Rufus King's Corps was attacked by a portion of Stonewall Jackson's force. King sent General Doubleday's Brigade, which the 76th NY Volunteers was attached, to reinforce the hard pressed General Gibbon's Iron Brigade.

The following extract from On Many A Bloody Field By Alan D. Gaff, Indiana University Press, 1996 gives a brief description of the battle as follows:
"The Union line of battle stretched from the John C. Brawner house, where the Hoosiers held the left flank, eastward beyond the woods in the following order: 2nd Wisconsin, 7th Wisconsin, 76th New York, 56th Pennsylvania, and 6th Wisconsin. For ninety minutes, these six regiments (four of Gibbon's and two of Doubleday's) held in check four brigades from Stonewall Jackson's force. Federal troops within hearing of the battle thought that the musketry sounded "like that hailstones upon an empty barn." One New Yorker observed: "Sometimes the firing would slacken a little as if both sides were losing heart, but then came a wild cheer and a yell and the rattle of musketry would become louder and more fierce than ever." The roar of battle meant only one thing: "bright young lives were going out at every instant like tapers in a wind."
This was the opening to the battle of Second Manassas, or Second Bull Run, in which Union forces under General John Pope was defeated by Confederate forces under General Robert E. Lee in a battle that lasted to September 2, 1862. It was the last battle for private Henry C. Sutton.

Henry came from a small hamlet of North Pitcher, located in Chenango County, New York where he lived with his parents Catharine "Kate" (born 1822, died 1896) and Lorenzo Sutton (born 1811, died 1886) and their children: Mary, Ansil A. (born Oct 21, 1850, died 1879), Frank D. (born June 19, 1852, died 1925), John L. (born March 1, 1855), Nettie E. (born February 9, 1858, died June 1925 ) and Ida R. (born June 19, 1859) on a small poor farm next to his brother Alonzo Sutton and up the hill from the Parce family farms.

The following letters were discovered in a review of Catharine Sutton's Pension file at the National Archive. The letters were deposited with the federal pension office when Catharine Sutton applied for a Mother's pension in 1879. She could receive a pension if she was destitute and could prove that her son, Henry, had been a supporter of her and her family when he was in the United States service during the Civil War. The letters were used as proof that she qualified as Henry had sent $10 a month home to support them. The search was intitiated when Conrad Bush received a Civil War letter from his father's first cousin's wife, Evelyn Bush, who found the letter written by Henry to his cousin Ferdinand E Bush, in a drawer in her home in LaFayette. The letter had been preserved by Ferdinand and given to his son Burdette and then on to Evelyn. A small link to the past has led us to a great deal of family history and an insight into the life of a 19 year old private and his eleven months of service.

The letters were transcribed from copies of the original letters and have retained the original spelling and lack of punctuation. Henry's writing improved over the course of his letter writing which indicated his continued education from letters that were written to him. His letters show his concerns for home, family, religion, the war and his willingness to give his life for his country.

September the 29, 1861

Dear father i thought i would wright and let you know how i like the bisness i like it first rate wee are boarding bought a half a mile from camp wee have first rate fare wee have fresh muton every meal and cofee and every thing enough wee have a camp made of boards it is batened all up now and wee have a stove i was on gard lasnight i like it first rate wee have lots of fun i am well and i hope these few lines will find you the same to tell the children i would like to see them Mother i send my love to you dont give your self eny unnesary truble for i am well provided for now be contented now a few lines to Mary be a good girl and your parents Wright often and bless Ida and a nglent brother pleas send me two dolars if you have it and my corse boots and my coat Wright soon Judson sed that he wrote for to send a blanket you neednt send no blanket nothen but the overcote and boots and money i bought a sachel and putee and it took all of my money no more at present good by
Henry Sutton

Lincklaen October 1, 1861


Dear Rememberd son we received your more than wealcome letter in due time and were glad to hear from you and ever shall we rejoice to hear of your well doing Henry my boy be manfull be brave be steady and be an honor to your self and parents we want to see you when in honor we can look up on the larals you have wone my son be of good cheer and look fourth to the time when our countrys commotion Shall be victoriously still and peace shall again restore our brave youths to the land of their births you must write often and we will do the same I will now leave room for your Mother

Farewell

Lorenzo Sutton

My Dear Dear boy the circumstances under which I am placed renders it allmost impossble for me to write but I must improve the opertunity be my feelings what they may how glad I was to here from you o Henry it seems hard to be thus parted but duty requires it not only duty to our country but our creator whom we aught to reverenc and revere and to him it is you must look for comfort and aid in every hour of trial my prayers shall assend the holy hill of Zion in your behalf and the rest of your brother Soldiers that right shall soon triumph be firm decided my son stand by your mates and they will by you remember be firm and never waver stay till in honor you can return we are all well as when you left do not worry about us the Lord will provide Do not neglect to write every opertunity we are allways anxious to here from you have courage and remember that the willing and obedient shall reap the good of the land ever shall I remember you in love and so good bye at presant

Catharine M Sutton

Dear brother as there is room I will say a word or to not thinking to add to what has all ready been said but to let you know you are rememberd by me give heed to what your parents have said to you I can not say much this time only take care of yourself of yourself and come safe back to us the children join with us in this to you Aunt Marian was a going to send you a blanket but you said no send it an so she has not but if you kneed it she will send it yet my love to you my brother good bye

Mary L Sutton

The top of the letter is decorated by a 35 star American Flag blowing in the wind with the sun bursting behind it. Under it is written PROTECT IT!

Oct the 22 1861
Camp Campbell
Cortland Hill


Dear father it is with pleasure that i take my pen in hand to let you know how i get along and how i got hear i am well and i hope these few lins will find you enjoying the same blesing after you left us we went a foot to the top of the hill a team came along and we road clear to Cortland we have not got our unaformes yet but 10 of our Comp got theirs and ours tomorow and then i shall come home thay have got a man in the goal for trying to run a way and they have yet another in jail to for striking an afalecer the Curnel ses that it is not likely that will strike a nother and give my love to mother and mary and ansel bless the rest of the Cheldreng for me give my respects to unke Lons folks Uncle and Polys folks and tell me how Judson gets along tell James Sutton to kiss my ass no more at present only remahn your afectenatt son

Henry Sutton

The top of the letter is decorated by a 35 star American Flag blowing in the wind with the sun bursting behind it. Under it is written PROTECT IT!

Cortland Camp
Camp Bell the 24, 1861


Dear Father i thought i would wright agan and let you know how i am geting along i am geting a long first rate i have not got my uniform yet but the Captain sed that he tought that wee should have them this week and then i shall come home Father please go round and get money enough to give and ford to make me and Benjaman each of us a durk knife like Burlingotn Buttons and go over to the Springs and get sheaths for them get Silas Lewis to make them you can get a knife and sheath for two dolars apease Benjamans and mine will cost four dolars now a work to Mother and the Children be of good Chear for i shall wright often kiss the Chilren for me no more at presant only i remahn your Sun

Henry Sutton

Hdqtrs Company B
Cortlandville Camp Campbell
Dec 15, 1861


Dear uncle and Aunt and Cousin Ferdanand

It is with plesure that I take my pen in hand to inform you that I am well and hope that these few lines will find you all the same will be going to start for Albany next Tuesday in the fornoon will start coming that way we are a going to travel a special train that runs between time and when it comes come up all of you for I want to see you give my love to Maria and if she is thare tell hur to come up to Benjaman sends his love to you Maria and all the rest of the folks out thare and he says he is agoing to wright to you out thare when he gets down South in duty give my love to all of uncle Charles folks be sure and come up to the Station I dont think of anyting more at present only remain your friend and well wisher H. C. Sutton

My pen is poor my ink is Black if you cant read this send it back now to Maria my pen is poor my ink is pail but my love to you shall never fail Henry C. Sutton

Albany Depot Jan the 6, 1862


Dear father I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well with the exceptions of A vary hard Cold and Sore throat and I hope that these few lines will find you in health I have not got much news to write but thought I would say A few words to you I shold like to see you vary much tell the Children not to greve for me for I am Coming home agan if it is gods will dont give up to disper for for me for I will remember you as long as I live for you have been good to me tell J to write to me and let me how he is geting along for havnt Hurd from him since I've come no more at present so good by kiss the Children for me from your friend and Sun Henry Sutton to Lorenzo Sutton

To Mary Sutton
From H C Sutton


Albany Depot Camp Rathbone
Tuesday evening Jan 7, 1862


Dear Sister I reseved your leter today and was glad to hear from you I am well and hopeful that these few lines will find you the Same I have not got much to write only be good to your parents and mind them for they are good to you Dont think that you cant write but write often Ansel you must hury and learn to wrtie so that you can write to me father Dont think that I have forgoten you for I have not nor shall not foreget you both write something we expect to go from hear tuesday but I dont know as wee shall so take good care of yourselves tell R Parce that I send my respects to him that I Should like to see him tell John Page that to besure and Stop here when he goes back tell Frank to write to me I Cant think of eny more tele the Children that to be good Children from H C Sutton So good by

Tell Net to be a good girl and be patient and then like enough that I will Come home Sometime and See hur I have writen to Whelocks folks and to Aunt Hame and have written one and have got eny reply yet from hur and I shant write agan until She does I cant think of eny more So good by from your Sun and well wisher H C Sutton

Albany Camp Rathbone
Jan the 8 1861 (1862)


Dear father I resevd your leter night before last and was glad to hear from you I am well and hope that these few lines will find you the same you say that mrs Pattersane is Dead but she is beter off than She was before for I trust that She has gone to God in who gave it She was old that she DId not take eny Comfort here upon earth but it is hard for hur Children to part with hur the news has come out here that Spense is dead and was Bared yesterday so that was not A vary hapy new years for mister Babcocks folks I Cant hardly think it is so but if it is so it is purty hard for Bacocks folks it seems like losing A Brother for he was Such A good Boy that I alwase thought So much of him that I Dont know how to part with him and then I thought So much of seeing him when I got Down in Dixie land but if it is So I Shall nvere see him again but I hope it is not so tell Jane not to languish not Sob with drooping head but to put hur trust in god and if she lives right she may some day see him in A land forever blessed wee was inspected Day before yesterday for our pay and we shall proverbly get it next week Some time tell James that he will get his pay two tell James if he dont write before long I shant write to him Agan for I have got tired of writeng to them that wount write to me tell the folks to remember me in thair prayer meeting for I feel the need of the prayers of Christen people I have resolved to mend my ways some what tell mother that I have not forgoten hur nor eny of the rest of you and am as glad to hear from you as you be to hear from me tell the Children that I want to See them vary much tell them to bee of good Cheer and look forward to the time when I shall come home I can when the war is all oer and peace restored to our Contry Agan and if I should never Come back Agan trust in god and wee will try and meet each otehr in that land that is forever blest my leter will bee Short this time for I hant got much news to write this time but I will write more next time so give my best respects to all Enquireng friends tell uncle Lones folks to write an Julia to you must now excuse me for I Cant write eny more now Ben is well and smart So a now good by for the present no more at present H C Sutton

pleas write Soon

Wensday the 19th 1862


Dear father I thought that I would write A few lines to let you kow that I am well and hope this will find you the same I Dont know but you think that I write to often but it dont cost me enything but the envelops and paper and that is not much to me I have not got much news to write this time Jared Brown was here this morning he looks just like the same old sixpence as he did when he was to home onley he has lost his teeth I must stop for Drill for it is time now I am off of Drill and it ranes like thunder and So I had not got eny thing else to do only write Mother would you like to see me I should like to see you and I hope the time is not far distant when I shall return home if the Lord spares my life for our armey is ridling them Sutherners like thunder now I dont think that they can hold out much longer if our men serves them as they have lately for they have given them fits lately but I am afraid that I shall never get a Chance at them for thare is so meney ahead of us now and the Officers have been trying to get the Col out of his office and he sed if thy succeded in doing it he should disband the reg and I hope they will for if I am discharged here I Shall join Charley Gralets reg of Cavelry for I like that vary much what is the reason Ransom dont write Mary if you will write often to me I will Send you postage Stamps here is paper with same news in it one I bought to day but I must close tell the Children that I should like to see them tell E Barber to write to me give my love to Charles Eaton and all those of the folks out thare so I will close by bideng you good by write often from your afectionate Brother

H C Sutton to Mary L Sutton
of North Pitcher and Lincklaen

Rikers Iland Jan the 28, 1862


Dear Friend I thought that I would write to you once more and let you know that I am well and hope that these few lines will find you the same and all the Rest of the folks and thare I have got some news to write but I supose you would not Call it much news but I Call it good news now I will tell you what it is wee have got marching orders to go from here to Washington this week and I am glad of it for I had Staid round here long enough for I want to See Some of them Darnd rauscals for I want to get A Shot at some of them for I want to see this thing Settled and I want to Do my Share towards it I have not got much news to write but I thought that I would write A few lines wee have got all the oysters and Clambs wee want and I wish you had Some of them Down thare to night for they are good has Father got that money Safe that I sent to him I am waiting to hear from it for I am afraid that the Directions will get Rubed out for it is Directed with a lead pensil I sent twenty Dollars by Capt Fox is first coming with him I had sent to the City tonight by Chancy Crandal to get me A Ruber Blanket for I think that I shall need one before I get back the Barax here is vary Cold Colder here than eny other place I have been yet and the place is as Cold as greenland I had writen three letters home and have not got eny from them yet but I Shant stop writeng If they Do for I hant got eny thing else to Do and I Supose they have I will now Close and leave Room to write to Aunt Julia and Uncle Lanes and Uncles Lons folks and to our folks I have got A vary Small Sheet of paper but it is the best I could Do and I will try and get A large Sheet next time I Cant write a vary long leter this time to eny of you but I hope the next will be longer I will now Close by Bideng you good by from your friend H C Sutton Write to new york City 76 Regt NY B N Y S V in care of Capt O C Fox

Continuation of the above letter of January 28, 1862.

Aunt Julia Parce

Rikers Iland Jan the 28th 1862


Dear Aunt J thought that I would write to now A few lines to you to let you know that I am well and hope that hese few lines will find yu the Same my leter will be Short for I have not got much news to write and what litle I Do write you Cant Read I Dont Expect but if you Cnt Read it Sent it back and I will Read it for you but enough of that I wrote to Aunt Ruhame and aunt Mary Smith last night is Lucia Wight to your house now if She is and She Dont write will not wrte to hur Uncle you must Save your money and get all you have and go west with me when I Come back if I ever Do and I guess I Shall I know I Shall if the Lords willing I shold like to see you all but I shant till I Come back agan and then it aint likely that I Shall see all of you for thare is so many Diseases that it ant very likely that wee Shall meet agan but I hope that wee shall I cant think of much news to write for thare ant much news to write and So I will Stop the other night thare was A Ship wrecked upon the iland but they was nobody hurt thare was four men and A Boy on Board they had on board tub barels of beer and the boys went Down and Taped one of them and got all the beer they wanted to Drink but I Did not Down for I thought that it want mine and so I let it be but enough of that you tell Gerome that he must make his father by him A litle Drum and So he Can lern to Drum tomorow morning wee lave here for Dixe and I am glad ot it for I want to be Down thare A Doing Something fo my Country for I have not Done eny thing for it yet but it is becase I have not had A Chance to but when I Do get at it I will fight the harder but I must Close for want of Room so good by till the next time Please write soon to me no more at present

Note: at the bottom of the sheet is a decorative banner which cannot be read.

Continuation of the January 28th, 1862 letter.

Rikers iland Jan the 29, 1862


Dear uncle as I had not writen to you I thought that I would write to you and let you know that I am well and hope thse few lines will find you the Same I would kike to see All of you I have not got much to write and what I Do write I presume you Cant Read for I am vary poor writer have you Broke your Colt tell Charles to write to me tell Jane that She has not fulled hur promis to me for She Sed She would write to me if I would to hur but She has not writen to me eny yet and I shant write agan till She does to me wee go to New York tomorow and nexday wee a take Cars for washington and that is A bulley notion tell Eunice that I Send my Best Respects to hur and tell hur to write to me and Tell hur that picture I will get taken just as Soon as I Can get A Chance Tell our folks to write to me for I want to hear from them tell Charles that I Shall write to him Soon tell Frank Parce to write to me Aunt marian I will write to you Just as Soon as I get to the place of my destenaton B G Eaton has had the mumps but is beter now Deforest is well I wrote to Aunt Ruhama yesterday I Dont think of eny thing more to wrtie so I will stop by biden you good by from your Apectioate nephew H C Sutton

Please write soon

Been the unlukiest fellow of my Age that ever lived I guess but I have made up my mind to Do better better now for I feel the need of A savior to guide my ways in my Triels and tribulations here from my friends but I will put my trust in god the auther and finesher of all things tell grand mother that I send my Best Respects to hur and grandfather and Should like to see them bary much tell R. Parce that I send my Best respects to him and should like to see him tell Aunt Julia the Same and send C Taynes folks the Same and uncle Lones folks to tell Julia that I had A letter from Mari the other night and She was well I Dont think of eny thing of emportance to write only tell aunt marian that B Y Eatton and D. Peterson and J Parce is well Ratio is still Sick but is not vary Sick he Will get Well in A few Days for he is not So Sick but what he is out Round and I guess that I will Stop for I Dont think of eny thing more to Write onley I Remain your afectionate Sun you must Excuse mistakes for you know that I am vary poor writer but I will Close By Bideng you all good By from your Afectionate Brother H C Sutton Direct your letters to Washington D.C. 76 Regt B N Y S V send in care of Capt O C Fox

Pleas write as Soon as you get this no more at present so good By

LaFayette Feb 2 /62 (1862)

Dear Cousin

We rec your letter last night and was glad to heare from you and was glad to heare that you was enjoin yourself so well I wish that I was there long enough to get a good dinner of Clams and oysters if not longer we are all well as usial and hope this will find you the same . Grand Father and Grand Mother have both gone to Linklaen they were all well down there the last time we heard from there Uncle Charles folks are all well Three of the boys that went from here have been brought back dead within a week one came home a satuarday and was buryied a Sunday and the next came abut the middle of the week and the rest was buryied the next Sunday The gals are all sound Clip Alexander at any rate

So good bye at present
Ferdinand Bush

Absent tho not forgoten nefew it gave me great pleasure to hear from you again and that you enjoy your self so well I see by your letter that you have got your pay and I also see that you have not forgot your folks at home as some boys do when they leave the home sirkle they look upon new senes and soon forget the home of thare childhood do not thinke it will be so with you Henry when you think of therer thankfulness and the tears of sorow they will shed over that money you sent them thankful for your kindness and thoughtfulness of them in your distance they can not help but feal sorry that you can not be with them yet when they think how good you are to them it will make their hearts glad to think they have got so kind a son - now Henry you must be a good boy be true to your country and cary your self in such a way and manner so that if you are luckey enough to once more return to your home and fiends it may be with honer so that we may all have a day of rejoising with the Soldier returned I have no more to write this time pleas except this from your Aunt Lucinda

PS As you spoke about sending your likeness I will try and send mine in return Please write soon Dear Cousen I take my pen in had to let you know how I git a long

F E Bush
Washington
Maridaen (Meridian) Hill
Feb the 10, 1862

Dear Sister I reseved your letter tonight and was glad to hear from you and that you was all well I am well and as this leaves me So I hope that it will find you I have not got much news to write but I will Do the best I Can wee Came up here last tuesday and I went over and Stade with Charles Fallet and A Nelsen Dickerson that night and I had A Bulley good time to they got up A first Rate Breakfast wee are within about Sixty Rods of them and Some of them are over here about every Day wee have got our guns and Catrige Boxes wee have got Endfield Rifels and they are good for two hundred Rods and kill the darnd Rebels thare has been A man Shot the other night for Runing the gard the gard told him to halt an he was tight and Did not Stop and the gard shot him and he DIed the next Day and he sed he Did not think that he would Shoot I was on gard last night and so was all of our Company wee go on gard by hull Companes here thare has been A batle come our boys has taken Fort Machenry and thare was A bout four hundred men on the out Side of the Fort and they Run like fuery and thare was about one hundred men in the Fort and our boys took all of them prisoners father Dont feel bad for I will try and take Care of my Self for if I Dont take Care of my self I am sure that their not eny Body take Care of me tell John that he is welcome to the money that bought his Boots and I am glad to hear that he feels So well I Can hear the Canons firing all the time tonight and I Dont know what it means the Drum is Beeting for role Call and I must Stop till morning it is now morning and I have Comensed writeng agan wee are Camped in tents four in A tent and wee Cook our own fare and I like that Bulley well wee have the best kind of food wee have got A Stove in our tent and wee have got a kitle and A tepot and A frying pan and now I will tell you what wee get to Eat wee will have one loaf of bread A day to A man and wee get A pound and A half of meat to a man and then wee get potatoes and Coffee and Beanes and Sugar to Sweeton our Coffee witha and wee have to look to ourseves and wee get all wee want and more two I had A letter from Furdand the other night and I will Send it to you and let you Read it tell Ida that if She is A good girl hur Brother Henry will Come back and See hur if the Lord is willing and I hope that he is and I trust that he is willing Father you must be Content till I Come back if I ever Do and if never Do DOnt be Down harted when I Draw my pay Agan I will send you twenty Dolars more if nothing hapens so tha I Cant but I guess that I Can and then I want you to get Ida that new Dress and Shals tha i promised hur when I was in Cortland and tell hur I bout it an see what She will Say Tom Sharp is geting Breakfast while I write you Spoke of having a Spelling School I wish that I Could have been thare to have attended it but I was not So I will Say no more About it tle the Teacher that I send my best Respects to him and Should like to see him vary much tell Jane that I Shant write to hur till She Does to me and that I Dont Supose She Cares for that tell Frank that if he Does not write to me before long that I Shall write him one that will set him up Mary here is A book that I Shall send you I have no papers to uncles Lones Folks mother you must be content Ansil you must be A good Boy and mind his paients and not Do as I Did for I have it to think of now and go to School and try to lern as fast as you can and not Run Away from School as I Did but get lerning and try and be A grate man an Above all things obey your heavenly father for all things good for I have

Henry C Sutton
Not signed


Meridian Hill
Feb the 19, 1862


Dear Father it is with pleasure that I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and as this leaves me So may it find you and in health and all the rest of the folks out thare it is vary Sickley Down here A good meny of the boys here has been Sick and Horatio Marble is Sick now and has been Sick for over two weeks but is A little better now but he is purty sick now I have been blest with vary good health ever Since I have been enlisted but I cant tell how long I shall be so wee cant tell when wee may be taken Sick David Brown was here day before yesterday and he looks tuff and healthy he says that Jare Rogers has got his discharge and is A going home I had A letter from Go L Bush the other day He sed that they was all well and that manly was geting quite Smart She had got So that done considerble work and went a visating Some but I must hury up for I have got to go on gard Soon for I am on gard today and it ranes like the Duce today but that is nothing to us here I dont have to pay eny postage here now and so I will write oftner now but you need not answer all of tehm unless you are amind to here is Some postage Stamps that I have got left and So I will send them to you mother you must be of good Cheer for I think that I Shall return before long Mary you must write often to me and write all the news and I will write more than often to you and Ansil you must be a good Boy and not Run Away from School for lerning is beter than Silver or gold so I have been told tell Ida and Net that I am Coming back to see them soon tell R Parce that I Should like to see him and should like to hear from him two tell Frank Parce to write I dont think of eny more So good by from your Afectionate Sun H C Sutton please write soon

Maridian (Meridian) Hill
Feb the 23, 1862

Dear Sister I Receved your letter last night and ws glad to hear from you and that you was all well I am well and as this leaves me So may it find you all in health and in good Spearits and enjoying yourselves to the vary best advantage you sed that Emma Lane has writen to me if She has I have not Reseved eny from hur yet you Spoke about Poley Parce sed if I would write to hur but I Cant think what she wants me to write to hur for but if she wants me to write to hur I supose I Can but I Darndley hate to for I am not much Aquainted with hur you sed that folkes wanted to know how Steve got A long he is as mean as he was to Come thank onley he Cant get eny whiskey to Drink here now I will tell you who Camps with me John Parslo and James Spaulding and Stephan Benette we have warme wether here but it Ranes About every Day here and the mud is About knee dep here if you had such weather thare you would be Adoing your Spring work thare is no snow here and has not been since wee Came here to Stay on two Dayes to A time but I supose you have got good laying out thare and I should like to be thare to take A Slay ridde some of these night with you and the Rest of the girles but thare is no use in talking for I Cant be but I have had news to write wee have got to leave here and go into A Fort and Drill with Cannons and that Dont Suit eny of us but wee shall have to put up with it Father I have put Down my name to Send you ten Dollars A month and when the pay master when he comes to pay us he will have checks with your name Sined to it and it is good to eney bank in the united states and no body Can draw the money but you and if it is loste they will send you Another one so you See that I have not forgoten you as you ded I would When I enlisted and when you get the money pleas get all of the Children some things to Remember me by mother you must be of good Cheer and be Content and it will all Come out Rite I have got some encelopes that I will send to you and Mary Tell Frank to be A good Boy and go to School and learn as fast as he Can for I want to see how well he Can Spell and Read tell all the Children that I want to see them Ben is going to write to you in this givemy loves to all the folks out thare tell R Parce I Should like to see him vary much I dont think of eny more at present so good by from your Afectianate Brother H C Sutton please write often and I will send you Stamps no more At present

Letter to Mr. Furdanand Bush
Lafayette
Onondaga Co.
NY

Postmarked Washington, D.C.
Feb 29

Note: the envelope is decorated with an Eagle with raised wings holding onto a ribbon with its beak and the national shield in its claws and the words THE WAR FOR THE UNION across the top center. The original letter, with envelope is in the possession of B. Conrad Bush January 1997.

Wensday Feb the 26th 1862

Dear Cousin I receved your letter last night and was glad to hear that you was well I'm well and as this leaves me So may it find you I have not got much news to Write this time but hope that I Shall have more next time Louis Blackman has been vary Sick with the Typhoid fever but has got better now he has got so that he goes out round now Wee moved yesterday about three miles from whare we was before and wee are nearer to the City than wee was before wee are about A mile and one half from it now wee are in A fort now and I like it better here than eny whare else that I have been Since I have been enlisted I think some of Coming home on A furlow in the Course of a Couple months if the lord is willeng Can Clif and Maria guess who them valentines is from I Can for I Saw the fellow when he Sent them and I guess that Someone else has got one two I guess Miss E L Bush has got one two Whare is grand Father and grand Mother now I guess that wee Shall get our pay in the Course of A week or two agan And then I shall get 36 Dolars and then I Shall send 20 home to Father give my love to Aunt Lucinda and all the rest of the folks out thare I would write to Maria if I new whare she was I Dont think of eny more at present so goodby from your Cousin H C Sutton Direct first same as you did the other to Washengton D C

Note: The first page in the upper right corner had an illustration of General McDowell. The paper is outlined in a small border of red (on the top) and blue (on the right side) and has faint blue lines to keep writing even.

Feb the 27th, 1862

Dear Father and mother if She is alive Sisters and brothers I received your welcome letter last night and was glad to heare from you but not to heare that mother is Sick I am well as usal I have enjoued the best health this winter that I ever did in the World mother I am A fraid you never will get well and if you Should never get well I Should feel so bad that I Should not Care to live but mother you must not give your Self eny unesiness about me for I Can take Care of my self and if you Do you never will get well but thare is no use in felling bad for I am acoming home agan fore the next pay day after this one now I shall Come home on A furlo maybe I Should like to have been thare to your last Dayes School but was not so I will Drop that now I received A letter from Maria night before last She sed that the folks was all well out thare it is Spring here now it Raned last night all night and this morning it is Clear and pleasent but the wind Blows Some father you sed you wanted me to be Carfull and not let the Rebels Shoot me on gard but I guess I shall not for wee are more than 20 miles from eny relbels and wee think wee shall stay here SOme time and proverbly wee Shall never go Away from here untill wee go home now if you will get them pictures taken just as Soon as mother gets well enough father if you will get Some black Close to have it taken in for it looks So much better and I will have mine taken withmy gun and Cartrige box on and it will look bulley I mus Close now so to have it go today pleas write every time you have time and I will Do the Same no more from your Sun and well wisher

Henry C Sutton

The boys are all well but Jud and horatio and they will get along before long I guess

Furt Slemer (Slemmer)
March the 5th, 1862
Dear Mother

Mother Sister and Brotherss I once more take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well as usual and enjoying the best health that I ever Did in my life and I believe that this Solgering agrees with me as far as health is Concerned and I like the buisness first Rate and I am bound to stickes as long as the War lasts if they will keep me for I just begin to like the buisnessfor wee have enough to eat and drink as far as Cold Water is Concerned and tea and Coffee for wee have enough of that and I would not drink eny Whiskey if I Sould get it and I Cant get it if I would Drink it I have not had A pass Since I have been here but when I get my pay I shall get one and go Down to the City and get my likeness taken I got A new suit of Close yesterday A Frock Coat and it is A nice one two if I had Such a Coat and was thare to home I should think it was good enough for me to ware eny whare and "S" got A Pare of pants and A pare of shoes I wrote to Aunt Mary Smith A quite A while A go and have not Reseved eny from her yet and I guess I will write Agan tomorrow for I guess she has not got it and I want to know whare to Direct to A Smith and mother you must hury and get Well fore I am looking for that likeness and Mary I wish you would have yours taken to for me you Can have it taken on pasteboard and send it in a letter and if I was in you place mother I would have it taken on pastboard two for it will be so much handier to Cary for I have not got A vary good place to Cary A likeness in Mary whare is Julia Wight now and how Does she get A long give my Best Respects to uncle Abes folks and likewise to R Parce and ask him why he Dont write to me tell him that I should like to Come and stay all night with him tomorrow night but I guess I shall have to like A quite awhile give my love to grand mother and tell her that I should to see her vary much I give my best Respecks to Charles Eaton and tell him that I should like to see him vary much give my Respects to Jane Babcock and ask her whot the mater that she Dont write for I have writen three letters to her and have not Received eny from her yet give my Respects to Eunice and all the folks to Lincklaen and North Pitcher I dont think of eny thing more at present write soon

Henry Sutton

Furt Slemer (Slemmer)
March the 9th 1862
Dear Father and Mother Sisters and Brothers I Reseved your letters last night and was glad to hear that you was Well I am Well and as this leaves me so may it find you I got five letters last night and one paper and I will tell you who they was from one was from Jane Babcock and one was from Verner Blackman and was from Lucia and one was from Mary and one was from you Mother and the paper I Dont know who that was form and so my letter will my letter will be short this time for I have got to Answer all of them that I got last night and that will take purty nere all Day but I thought that I would write to you first and So if I Did not have time to write all of them you would et yours first I thought that it was my Duty to write to you for all eny body else but I dont know as you Can read it for I am in such A hurry but I guess you Can Study it out some way it is the nicest weather you ever Saw her now it is Clear and its warm as Sumer in the Day time but it freases nights thare has not been eny Snow here since wee have been here wee have enough to eat and that is good enough tell R Parce that I send my love to him and would like to see him vary much and tell him to write to me if he has eny Regard for A Solger for he Cant guess how much good it Does a Solger to hear from A friend father if you will send me some Stamps I will Do as much for you as franken envelops wont go here after tomorrow and wee Cant get Stamps vary handy here pleas send me one Dollars worth and I will make it wright when I get my pay I dont think of enything more So I will Close by Bideng you good by write often to me and I will do the same from your Sun and well wisher H C Sutton to Lorenzo and Cathrine Sutton

Furt Masachusetts
March the 16th 1862
Dear Father and Mother and Brothers and Sisters it is with pleasure that I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and as this leaves me So may it find you enjoying good health I Removed for a Forts tenant last monday morning and Came here it is about three miles from Whare wee was then to Whare wee are now and it is A better place here than it was thare but I Dont expect to stay here vary long for I herd the Sargent Mager say to Day that we Should go on expadition in less than two Weeks and I should not be surprised if wee did and if wee Do we shall See Some fighing yet and that is what will Suit me for I want to have the privelege of killing fome Rebels my self before I Come home if I ever Do and I guess I Shall for I am tougher than A fiteh Tine knot and Dont have eny sickness of eny kind but wee Cant tell how long I Shall be so for one of our Boys got shot last sunday night with A Revolver that Amos Miner had loaded in his hand and it went off and hit him in the hip and Struck the Bone and glanced and loged Down in the flesh in his but and they Cant get it out but he will get well I guess but it is ten Chances to one if it Dont make him A Criple for life but I hope not for he was A mighty good Boy his kname is Elbridge Burnham from Pitcher vilage Wee have to Drill purty hard now A Day but I am good for all of that but I Dont think of eny more only be of good Cheer for I am of good Cheer pleas write as often as you Can aford to and I will Do the same write all of the news I supose they have begun shugering I must Close by bideng you good By give my love to all Enquireng friends no more at present from your afectionate Sun and well wisher H C Sutton to Lorenzo and Cathrine Sutton Pleas Write as soon as you get this

Furt Slemmer
March the 19th 1862

Dear Father it is with pleasure that I onse more attempt o Write to you and not that one is Dear but because I thought that I would for I should like to hear from you and I thought that if you was eny like me you would like to hear from me and I thought you was and so I thought I would write A few lines to let you know how I was I am well now for my knee has got about well for I went out on Drill this afternoon thare is not eny news of interest to write this time will have not got our pay yet and the talk is now that wee Shall not get it untill the first of May and what Do you think of that and what will you Do in that Case you will be hard up before that time will you not but first as soon as I get it I will send it for I Cant send it untill I get it you know and so you Cant blame me and you must get along the best you Can until I get it then things have Come to Washington but have no Came to Camp but wee expect them tomorrow morning if nothing happens what Do you think the the freight was on the two boxes wall I will tell you it was a Dollar and 55 Cents I should think that was enough to pay on six hundred pounds I Donth think of much more this time onely give my love to Miss Eunice Barber and tell her that I shall write to her before long if she will answer it I shall have to stop for Role Call so good by for this time pleas write as soon as you get this from your afectionate sun H C Sutton

give my Love to all Enquireng friends tell Uncle A D Suttons folds to write to me and R Parce two pleas give this other letter to Julia Wight no more at preasent from H C Sutton to Lorenzo Sutton and Cathrine Sutton

Fort Slemer (Slemmer)
March the 21 '62


The picture of General McDowell is in the upper right hand corner of the first page.

Dear Sister I receved your leter last night and as glad to hear from you and that mother was better I am well and I am Contented but I Dont fell Content About mother for I Dont want eny o you sick but wee Cant expect to always be well for that is out of the question and wee must trust in god for he Doeth all things well and wee must take it as it Come for wee Cant have every thing just as wee would like it alwayes wee musterd last night for pay and wee shall proverbly get it the last of next week wee expect some new Close this week and then I shall have my picture taken Frank you must be A good boy and keep your nose Clean Frank you must have some Close when Father gets the money that I am agoing to send to him now Frank you must be good Boy and mind your mother and not Swear Frank if you will stop swearing by the time that I Come home I will bring oyou nice present and if Johney will Stop I will bring him one two now Frankly you Cant say that I hant wrote eny to you Ansil you must be good boy and help Father Father you must Cheer up for I am A Coming home all rite has the mre got entirely over hur lameness mother you must hury and get well for I am in A jury for that likeness I Dont think of eny thing more So I will Close by Bideng you good evening from your Brother and well wisher Henry C Sutton

Fort Masachusetts
Sunday March the 30th 1862

Dear Sister your Welcome letter was Resieved last Friday night and was glad to hear from you I am well with the exceptions of the Soriest mouth and lips that you ever saw and I Cant tell what mades it for they are so sore that I Cant hardly eat enything and the Boys in this Company have most all have it my throat is not A bit sore nothing but the Roof of my mouth and toung and lipes the Reason why I did not answer it before is wee had A grand Review yesterday the General Double Day Came up from the City and enspected us and wee have to go out and Drill from Seven o'clock til one and then I had just Maled A letter to you that Morning you wanted to know if I had got them things I have got that Butter and Cheese and dried apples I have got them Pictures and I have got them Stamps so I guess I have got every thing you have sent me now about that knee I hurt it A jumping my feet bent over when it struck the ground and wrenched it but it Did not Slip out of joint then but I went to Drilling on it and it began to Slip out and it got so it Sliped out every time that I steped on it but I laid still with it about A fortnit and it is now s well as the other tell Net and Ida that I think all the world of them Pictures for I would not take fifty Dollars for them if I Could not get eny more tell Ansil that I am glad he is a good boy to help his father and Frank to help his Mother I should like it if I Could have been down to your Concert wee have not got our pay yet an Dont know when wee shall get it Dont you think that I improve in writeng purty fast Dont give your self eny uneasiness About me for I Shall take Care of myself I Can tell you I Dont think of eny thing more at present onely I Remain your afectionate Brother H C Sutton to mary and nsil and Frank Neta and Ida and father Mother an Johney what Does father mean by Numbering my letters

Number One
Fort Massachusetts

Dear Sister your letter that had the Pictures in and the one of Mothers that told about Kites being scarte and liked to run away with him Reached here to geather to knight and I ws glad to hear from you this is the first letter that I have numbered and so I numbered it one I am Well and the tuffest that i ever was in the World I have not got much news to Write this time and so it wont take me long to Write it them Boots that I got of Sharpe I have Worne all the time since that I have had them and I have onely just Worne off the first tap yet and thare aint the first hole or the first crack in them yet they are the best ones that I ever had you Can tell Mrs Marble that Horatio is going to have his Discharge this Week or Next and I am glad of that for he is vary feble and I dont think that he Would live many Months here in the Condition he is in here now for he has been bary sick but he is A grate Deal better than he has been I am vary much obliged to you for that likeness you sent to me and I have to look at that one of fathers and Mothers every Day for that is About all the Comfort that I take but wee expect to be Discharged before long and if wee are I an or Ben taldes some of enlisting into the Cavelry What do you think of that if you Dont Want me to I Wont but our Regt is not Discharged yet and I Dont know as it Will be all I kow about it is by What the Men most all think we Shall get it but I hope wee shall get it and I must Close for I have got to Wrtie to Verner Blackman tonight you must give my love to A A and now A few lines to father

I am Well and hope you are the same you say that you have got all of your oats thrashed and Dont you think that you had A purty good yeald off from the little piece of ground for I think you Did thare is not much news to write this time onely it is vary sickley here now and thare has five or six Died out of our Regt lately Do you know Whether Blackman is coming out here ---- and give my love to all the ferends out thare for I must Close from you afectienate Sun H C Sutton to Lorenzo Sutton and Catherin Sutton be of good Cheer all of you for I am A feeling first Rate and (missing two words) like it this Solger and to all the Rest of the Children tell them to be good and maybe that I shall have some Money to Send father to by them something good to eat and to Ware I will Do the best I Can to help you father but I must Close this from your afectionate Sun H C Sutton to Lorenzo and Catherine Sutton in answer to theres and to Mary L Sutton in answer to hers Ben says Mary you must send him one of your likeness.

Number two
Fort Massachusetts
Friday April the 17th 1862

Dear Sister I recseived your letter last knight and was glad to hear from you and glad to hear that you are all well I am well and enjoying my self Well and as this leaves me so may it find you I recseived A letter from Polley Parce last knight and it was A good one two and it was A good long one two it was the first that I have recseived from hur and I resceived one from E A Barber Also you sed you Wanted to know if my Mouth has got Well and I Will tell you that i has been Well almost A week and I am sound as A bullet now thare is not much nes to write this time so if I dont write A vary long letter this time you must not scold me Wee have not got our pay yet and they talk of ot paying us untill the first of May and then pay us for four Months but thare is so many stories in Camp that they Cant any body tell eny thing about eny enything they have had the story wesa many times that wee was agoing to be Discharged and now they have got A story that wee are going to Checago to gard Prisners but when I hear eny thing now I make up my mind that it is A Camp story and let it go at that wee have to Drill like fury but wee Can stand it but it is geting to be Purty Worm Weather here now and it is Pleasent Weather here two for it is Warm Day times and freeses knights so that it is just Cool enough so that wee Can sleep good I have not had one Pass since that wee Came from Albany and I never had but one While I was thare and then I went Down to the City to see the City but that is the only one I have had since wee Came from Cortland and that was only half A Day only one half Day in four Months I think is being Purty stedy for some of the Boys are gone half of the time but I dont have eny inclanaton to go way from Camp much I have just Eat my breakfast and I have fresh beef stake fride wee have fresh beef the most of the time now wee live first Rate and I have not eat up all of them things you sent me yet I have got about A pound of butter left yet and A but A half A Pound of Cheese left yet and all of them Curnts I have got left yet and about one third of them dried Aples I have got left yet and all of us in our tent has eat What wee wanted of them but wee have had so much other stuff that wee hant Cared for eny thing much but the butter you most kiss the Children for me but I must Close you must excuse this short letter and poor writeng for I am in A hurry and I have had to Write fast but I must Close now With Love to All good bye for this time pleas Write soon from your friend and Brother Henry C Sutton tom Mary L Sutton and Lorenzo Sutton and Cathrine M Sutton

Fort Massachusets
Saturday April 18, 1862

Note: This letter has been torn along the side of the page which makes a portion of each side unreadble.

Dear Brother I Resieved your Welcome letter Last night and glad to hear that you Was all Well I am Well and tuff as A Bare now you sed that you had taped a (missing word) trees and made Some Maple Sugar I am glad of that and you was trying to help all you Could and that in (missing word) much for you was A little Boy and that is so you (missing word) little Boy but you (missing word) father an awful sight (missing word) you are A mind to a (missing word) quess you are and I hope you (missing word) I hant got much new to write so I will Close from your Afectionate Brother H C Sutton To A A Sutton

Continuation of the above letter.

Fort Massachusetts
Saturday April the 18,1862

Dear Aunt Marian R Sutton your welcome letter was resieved tonight and I was glad to hear form you but not glad to hear that you was Sick (missing word) say you have Writen ( missing word) Do pen letters to me I have been in Washington (missing word) I have not had (missing word) one besides the line you (missing word) in fathers before this (missing word) I have writen six or seven (missing words) Could not tell what the reason was you did not write but not now I (missing word) the letters Did not Come through safe neither way and (missing word) Wrtien four or five letters to Emma Babcock who has never had only (missing word) from her yet but I (remainder of letter missing)

Fort Massachusetts
Saturday Morning April 19th 1862

Dear Sister I Reseived your Welcomb Letter last Wenedsday knight but I have Delayed writeng for I have had to Drill so hard this Week but I trust will excuse me this time and I will try and Do better in the future I am well and ever enjoyed So good health in my life as I have Since I have bee A Soldier for I have bee tuff as a bare ever Since I enlisted for I have not seen A Sick Day yet the Weather has been vary Warm for A few Days back and last kitht wee had A vary fine shower and it makes the grass look vary green and nice and the Peach trees have allmost Blowed out and every thing looks the Pleasentes kind and I tell you that it is the nicest Place here you ever saw but I must Close and Write to ansil this from your Brother H C Suttonn

now a few lines to Ansil I Reseived your letter and was glad to hear from you you must be A good Boy and help our folks all you Can for you know that I am not thare to help them and I want you to Do better than I Did when I was thare tell Mary that I have got them virses of Ellsworth and am much obliged to her for them now Ansil take good Care of Old kity for me for I would if I was thare but I aint and so I leave it for you to Do but I must Close this from your friend and Brother H C Sutton to Ansil A Sutton

now A few lines to father and mother I recseived your kind letter and I now am trying to answer it you must be of good Cheer for I shall look out for my self you Can bet on that and not loose neather I Dont see what the reason is that wee Dont get our pay but I supose wee shall get it when they get Ready to pay us and not before but I want them to get Ready before long I Cant write much this time for I have not got time but the next will be longer I hope Mother you must kiss the Children for me for I Cant if I Could would but I must Close pleas let Marian sutton see this this from your sun and wel wishes H C Sutton to Lorenzo and Cathrine Sutton

Fort Massachusetts
April the 20 (1863)

Dear friend

I take this oportunity to write a few lines to you in answer to your letter which I received night before last I am well I hope these few lines will find you the same I was glad to hear from yuo I had begun to think that you had fogoten me but I found I was mistakened it is Sunday and it raines Jud is a writeng and Ben is out in some other tent raising the Devil as usual when we get done writeng Jud and me are going out to borrow some milk of some cows that runs in a back lot this you must (word missing) your self I (word missing the letter has a stain and torn spot that makes it difficult to read) to be the (missing words) you and Charles must (missing word) sugar on rather (missing words) tell Charley that he must take good care of Mary

We have lots of fun and mighty hot weather we have plenty to eat I dont have to Drill much I havent been on guard nor drilled in three (word missing) but I will tell you what I have been a doing I have been a having farts like fury I have concluded that they (missing word) very nice.

You ought to write to me as often as you can and I will answer them you must excuse me for writeng with a friend but I must stop and bid you good by this from your friend Chester Frank

I would give a quite a considerable to see a couple eat mussle in Lincklaen.

Fort Massachusetts
Sunday April the 27th 1862

Dear Sister I rec your letter last tuesday andwas glad to hear from you but I have neglected writeng A quite A while but I had to Drill and then I have to stand on gard once in three Days and When wee aint on gard wee have to Drill all the time and so I cant have much time to write but I will try and be more punctial in writeng after this I reseived your letter No 3 last knight and was glad to hear that you was all well but I was sory to hear that Uncle James was Worse Agan for it seemes as though that he has Awful bad luck and I know he Does and I am Afraid that I never Shall see him Agan but tell him to be of good Cheer and dwo all he Can to get Well for I dwo want to see Agan I am well and enjoying life tops & health tell Johney that when I write agan I will write to him and Direct it to him all of it tell Neta and Ida that I have to llik at their Pictues Every Day the Peach trees are all blowed out an I will send you some blossoms in this letter Deforest has got you Picture and he says he is agoing to send you his when he gets his Pay Pleas hand this to Aunt Marian Sutter for I must close by bideng you good bye I got a letter from Mary E Wheelock the other knight and one from Albert two but I must stop Pleas give this other one two Eunice Barber and the other to you Verner Blackman if you Pleas So good bye all of you this from your friend and Brother H C Sutton to Mary L Sutton

November the 2, 1862

Dear Brother and Sister I seat myself down to write to you to let you know how we get along my folks are well as common except myself my helth is not so good as common the cold fall winds has not agreed with me very well I caugh more and ease more than I did when I was out to you hous Julias helth is vary bad I do not think that she will ever be any beter whe is the poorest person I ever saw she is falin all the time this is what I think and I dont think she will live two months Liman I am mutch obliged to you I dont expect to live to ever repay you. That God will but i hope to get well but I hope to get well for we live in hops anddye in dispare Mother is at our hous to day Mother has a hard time I tell you she dos and my hart aks for her se goes aroundoing all the good she can and gets no thanks for it, poor old Woman she will not stay with us allways I cannot write anymore so good by from your friend and Brother until Death

James J Sutton

November 2, 1862

Dear Sister as James has left room for me I am trying to fill it up I am enjoyn that great blessing health while I see so many striconed with disease James is not as well as he was when he was there Julia is very sick I was there last night she has failed a great deal since I see her before she is very poor she must get help before long if she ever does Father and Mother is here today Mother has not been here before in a good while she is pretty closely confined there I think it to much for she needs rest

Henry Sutton funeral sermon will be preached in two week from to day poor Henry he was shot through his head I hop he has gone to rest Catharine healh is quite poor and Learrin looks as if he had lost his last friend I cant think of any more as James has told you all so I will close with my best wishes pleas right

Phebe

pleas come down soon as convenient and bring Selenia for Julia wants her and Mother will go back with you I think Julia canot stand it long if she fails as fast as she has for a week or two back....


Civil War Letters Of Henry C. Sutton
Compiled by B. Conrad Bush


Camp Brightwood
Fort Massachusetts
Sunday May the fourth 1862

Mother i rec your letter knight before Last and i should have answered it yesterday but it will Reach you almost as soon now as it would if i had of writen yesterday i am well and tuff as a boild owl an when i tell you how much i Weigh you will say so two Wall i weigh just one Hundred and Forty pounds and that is Considerable more than i wer waighed before in my life i have not got much news to write this time but i will try and make it as interesting for you as i Can wee went up yesterday About two miles into Mariland and Surounded a house and then the Col went in and took two Bariels of Whiskey and Caried it off and what he Did it for was because that some of the Boys went up thare and got Drunk and Caried on so that they could not Do eny thing with them but it was not eny of our Comp it was some that Did while Mr Blackman was out here and he Can tell you all about it for he was here at the time but i must stop and leave Room to write Aunt Marian the boys are all well here now and fat as hogs when you write Agan let me know whare Julia is and if she got that letter that Horatio brought out to her from me but i must Close with Love to all Enquireng friends this from H C Sutton to Mrs Cathrine M Sutton tele Frank Parce to wright to me

Camp Double Day
Fort Massachusetts
Sunday May the 18th 1862

Dear Mother i recd your Letter Last knight and was glad to hear from you but i had just Mailed A Letter to you that Morning but i got A letter from Aunt Marian and seeing i was writeng to her i thought i would write some to you for it will not bust eny more to write to both of you than it would to one of you you say you Dont want me to stop writeng on the Acount of not having stamps i write a bout three times A week to you butt i guess that they are opened and then you Dont get them that Likeness i am going to have taken tomorrow Mornig and send it in this Letter to send to Mary me and Deforest are going to have it taken togeather with our guns and then before long and send to you Mary when Fransetia Come over give my best Respecks to her tell Neta and Ida that i shall Come home When i get my next pay and that i Will be mext Juli and that is if i Can get a furlo and i guess i Can tell father not to let out kit much this sumer for i want to take some rides when i Come home on furlough must Close with Love to all this from your sun H C Sutton to Cathrine M Sutton

Fredwicks Burg Sunday
the 25th 1862 (May)

Dear father mother Sisters and Brothers i now sit Down to write to you and to Let you know whare i am and how i get along i am Well and sound as A brick i am now within one half mile of the City of fredricks burg and the City is in sight and wee Can see it vary plain from whare wee are and Thomas Sharp is going to the City to Day for Patrole gard and wee are going to stay here to the City to gard it and thare is vary neer one hundred and fifty thousand men here and they are ging to march for Richmond in a few Days and David Browns reg is just acrost the River from us and they are onely two miles from us and Gorge Smith Came over here Last night just as soon as wee got here and he sed that the Rebel Pickets was within five mile up here and he sed that one of their men was shot the other Day while on Picket Duty and he sed that they was going out and Picket to Day Last Thursday when wee was Coming through the City of Washington thare was some men thare and they grabed one of our nigers and tried to strangle him so that he Could not yell but he bit their hands so that they could ot strangle him and he yelled Like a good fellow and our boys went back and knocked three or four men Down with their guns and got him back he was A Small boy about as large as Frand Parce and he stayes with our Captain Mr Blackman can tell you all about him for he was thare when he was out to our Camp wee had A purty hard time of it marching out here but wee are good for it wee Camped out on the ground one night and wee Did not have eny tents and it rained all night like the Duce and wee got wet as thunder for thare was not one Dry thread in our Close and marched all Day yesterday with wet knapsack on and haversack and Canteen and gun and that is over one hundred Pounds in heft and wee marched nine miles in A half Day yesterday and got here all Right i Sent mine and Deforest picture the other Day to Mary and when i Can get another one taken i will send it to you mother you must be of good Cheer for i shall take good Care of my Self you must take good Care of the Children for me here is some Secesh moey that i have sent to the Children one to Ansel and one bill to Frank and one bill to John and one to Nety and you can get Ida Something till i Can get her one and if She Wants one vary bad Ansil must let her have his and i Will Send him another just as soon as you get this this from your Sun and well Wisher H C Sutton with Love to all be of good Cheer for all Will Come out Wright when you Write Write all the news and Write something about all of the folks

Direct the same as before to Washington and it will Come Safe

Fredwicks Burg, Va
Wenedsday morning May the 28, 1862

Dear father once more i take my pen in hand to write A few lines to let you know whare i am i am whare i stayed the night before i wrote to you before i wrote to you before wee have been moving every Day for A week and wee have Came back to the Same old place whare wee stayed the first night wee are going to the City to Day and gard the City of fredwicks burg but i presume before wee get thare our orders will be Countermanded and keep us marching back and fourth allways and it is prety tuff to march and Cary about one hundred pounds heft on our backs and a gun besides and wee have to Do that and i have had the Diaree more than A Week and it makes me prety Week to i tell you but i gues i Can stand it for i am geting beter now father i Sent Some Clothe to Cortland the Day before wee moved and there probibly thare by this time and Ben and Jud and Gorge Cross sent some two and when they go to get them send by them to get yours for they will keep you in Clothes a quite a while but i must Close pleas hand this other page to R Parce this from your sun and well wisher H C Sutton to Lorenzo and Cathrine Sutton

Fredericks Burg
June 5th 1862

Dear Father it is with Pleasure that i take my Pen in hand to Let you know that i am well and Enjoying my self first Rate wee have Lots of fun Down in this Part of the Cuntry wee have to go on gard Every other Day but wee Dont have to Do Eny thing the Rest of the time i Write to you as often as twise or three times A Week and i have not Rec but One from you in over two Weeks and i Dont know Whether it is because you Dont write or Whether they Dont Come safe i Dont know as you Rec all of mine or not how Does making Shingles go but this time Ransome sed that you and he was going into that buisness but i must Close and leave Room to write Soome to mother for it is some time Since that i have writen to her and i Dont know but that She thinks that i have forgoten her but i have not if i Remember Wright and i guess i Do give my Best Respect to R Parce and Go and give my Love to all ot the Children and the Friends out thare and rec A share for your self with Love to all this from your Sun and Well Wisher H C Sutton to Lorenzo Sutton Pleas write soon as you get this

now A few lines to Mother and Cathrine M Sutton it is Some time Since that i have writen to you and i Dont know but you think that i have forgoten you but i Can Ashure you that i have not for you are to Dear to me for me to forget you i am Well and felling first Rate for wee have Lots of fun Down here Wee Dont have to Do much wee have had A vary hard freshet here yesterday and it Caried off two Bridges that went Across the River and i should guess that wee had fun about that time of the Day if Ever you must be of good Cheer for i shall Look out for my self i Can ashure you tell the Children to be good and mind their Parents and not Do as I Used to Do have they Stoped Swaring yet if they have they should have their Presents when I Draw my next pay but i must Stop for Want of news to Write now Write Just as Soon as you get this for i have not herd from you in A good while onely once and that was agood while ago that it was writen now write as soon as you get this for i must Close give my Love to all of the folks out thare and Rec a share your Self this from your sun and Well Wisher H C Sutton to Cathrine M Sutton

Yours in hast no more at Present so good By for this time tell Mary that i shall write to here the next time

The top of the first page of this letter is a picture of the United States Capital in Washington, D.C. It takes up the upper third portion of the page.

Fredericksburg Va
June the 1, 1862

Dear father i now have a few moments of lesure time and so i will Emprove the time for i shall write to you if you Dont write to me for it is most two Weeks Since i have hurd from you and have Writen half a Dozen to you and you have not answered them but if you Dont Write to me i shall to you every Chance that i Can get i Rec your Letter that had that peace of Calaco in it and i had just mailed A letter to you that morning and so i Did not answer it right off and i forgot it till now and now i Will answer it and i will try and be more punctial in the future i have bee acuseing you of not writeng but i Will not for i have got a letter from you since i have writen to you i am Well and hope you are all the same wee have good times here but i have been on gard four Days Wright strait along but i got off last night and that is the reason why i neglected to write to you before i Cant write much this time for i have not eny news to wrie so i Will Close by bideng you good bye pleas write to me as soon as you get this give my best Respecks to all Enquireng friends and kiss the Cildren forty times aday for me this from your sun H C Sutton to Lorenzo Sutton

The top of the first page of this letter is a picture of the United States Capital in Washington, D.C. It takes up the upper third portion of the page.

Fredericksburg, VA
Double Days Brigade
Monday Morning June the 16th 1862

Dear father and Mother Sisters and Brotehres i Rec your Letter some days Ago and i had Just mailed A Letter to you that morning and as i have not Writen Untill now and Night befoe Last from Mary and thare was some in it to Deforest and he wrote to you yesterday but it Did not go out and mine will get thare by the time that his Does i have not got eny news to Write but i Will Write all i know i am as Well as i Ever Was in my Life our Company found the other Day that belonged to the Secesh government six baresl of flour and tow of Barels of Molasses and one barel of pickels and wee have the flour baked inteo Shortcakes and have molases on it when it is Warm and have all the Pickels wee want and they took the Same Day A Lot of Rebel Solgers Clothing and six Barels of Whiskey and bout a hundred bushels of beans but the Whiskey Dont Do us Eny good for wee Cant get eny of it for they keep it Under A Lock and key but the Rest of the Stuff wee use all wee want of it Benjamon and A Nathan Rudock and John Parsel and Mort Johnson went to Washington with A Rebel Major that our Pickets Captured and they went Last Saturday and have not yet (come) back yet and i guess they Will have A good time two and i hope they Will for i should Like to have gone with them myself but i Shall have to Close for i am on gard to Day the Cheries and Strawbaries are ripe and i guess that wee get our share of them at eny Rate wee Calculate two and I guess wee Do and wee have Chicken for Breakfast About Every morning for thare is enought here in this City and they belong to Secesh and wee take them when we want them so you Can see that wee Live Purty Well i went out one night with another fellow and wee got seven hens and wee had all the Chicken Soop and Chickens wee wanted for the hole Company and wee Cared the the Captain and Leiutenant up some and they Ate it i tell you need not be eny Concern About us for wee Shall take Care of our selves i had A Letter from Polly Parce Last Saturday night and in it I found her Likeness and i Tell you it Looks natural as Life and it made me think of home but i must Close and Write Some to Ransom Parce for i have not answered his Letter yet give my Best Respecks to all of the People out thare and i would Like to know Why that Euncie Dont Write Mary give my best respecks to Lib Mury tell her that i Saw Oscar last night and he was Well and Doing well but i must Close with Love to All Enquireng friends this form your Brother H C Sutton
The top of the first page of this letter is a picture of the United States Capital in Washington, D.C. It takes up the upper third portion of the page.

Camp 8 miles East of
Fredericksburg June the 18th 1862

Dear Absent Sister your Letter was Rec night before Last andy wee had Just moved from the City and I Did not have time to Write that night nor yesterday and so i had to put it off Untill this morning but it Will not make much onely one Days Differance since i Wrote to you last monday tow thare is not much news to write only that i am Well and tuff as A Bare and that is good news to you i suposefor it is to me to hear that you all are Well and it is the same to you i supose to hear that i am Well but i am sorry that wee had to Leave the City for it was A good place and wee Did not have to drill eny thare and now wee have to Drill but wee Can tuff her thrugh i am sorry that Hiram is Dead how Deal must feel but he Died in A good Cose fighting for his Country and was killed in action and it shoes that he was A brave and good Boy and you say that one of Mr Heths Boys is Dead two but wee Dont know how soon all of us may Die and it is no more Apt that wee shall Die than you at home for wee shall all have to Die when our times Come Whether here or at home and if it is my fate i to Die in the armey or in Battle so i am Willing to Die Whare our god seath fit to have me Die but i must Close for i have got to go out on Drill in A few minets and i Shall have to stop (now) Mother because i Dierct my letters and head them to Mary Dont think that they are not to you for they are as much to you as eny of the Rest for they are to all of you i and Thomas Sharp has got A whole tent alone and i am glad of that but i must Stop wee killed two Oxen last night and wee have got one more to kill tomorrow for our Redg to Eat So wee have some more fresh meat agan and Tom and me got half of A Liver and you know that is what suts me for i Like and that was first Rate but i must Close this from your Brother H C Sutton to Mary and father and mother and Ansil frank and John neta and Ida with Love and great Respect to all Enquireng friends and Conections so good Bye till next time no more at Present

Camp Oppasite Fredericks
Burg Sunday Morning
June the 29th 1862

Absent father and Mother i Rec your Vary Welcome Letter Day Before yesterday and was glad to hear that you was all Well i am Well and as this leaves me so may it find you in health and Prospering finely for i am now i am going to tell you some Bad news Henry Finch is Dead and Baried he Died night before Last and was Baried yesterday he Died With the fever but he has gone to Rest but he was the Best Boy in the Company now About them Clothes that i Sent i Sent them in A small Box and i Sent them alone and thare was two Pare of Pants and A Wooling Blanke and two Shirtss and A Cap and A Roundebout Coat and i Sent them the same time that Ben Did his i have not got eny thing to Write that will interest you that i Can think of i Cant Write eny more than this letter for somebody has stolen all of my stamps but two and one of them i have Put on a letter this morning and the other i am going to Put on this one they stole one Dozen stamps and now i Shall have to stop Writeng so you must not think it strange if i Do not Write eny more but if i am sick Ben or somebody will Write to you and let you know it but i shall have to Close and Leave Room to Write to Ransome give my Respecks to all Enquireng friends and Relitives out thare and tell them that i should like to see them vary much but i guess that i shall have to Wait Awhile but i shall have to Close by Wishing you all good luck this from your sun and Well Wisher H C Sutton to Lorenzo and C M Sutton with Love to all Pleas give this other to Aunt marian R Sutton if you pleas

Camp opposite fredericksburg
Thursday July the 10th 1862

Absent Sister your letter that was Writen the fourth Rec yesterday and was vary glad to hear from you and glad to hear that you was all Well for health is A blessing to all of us i am Well and Enjoying tip top health as i Ever Did when i was to home you ded that father and Ransome was hoing Potatoes for their fourth and they Done Well for that was A thing that is nesasary to be Done in order to have them to Eat now i Will tell you What my fourth Was i Went over to General Double Days head quarters and herd A speech and it was the best Speech that i ever herd in my life and in the afternoon i Went With Deforest and Chet and Gorge Cross and got Some Blackbaries and wee got about two quarts Apiece and i Will bet that there was more than 100 bushels picked in that lot hat Day and is Every Day and last Sabut Thomas Sharp and me Went and got Some String Beans and wee got Enought for two meses and i Reckon they tasted old fashon i Dont Supose that you have got Ripe Blackbaries up thare yet but wee have Down here and the folks have Done their heigheng and harvesting Down here When Does the folks think they shall begin their heigheng up thare and Do you think of Cuting eny heigh on eny body this year or not i Cant Write much more this time give my Best Respects to R Parce and all the Rest of the folks and thare for i must Close by bideng you good Bye if you Will Pleas Send me A few Postage Stamps i Will try and Do as much for yu no more this from your Brother and Well Wisher H C Sutton to Mary Sutton So pleas Write Soon to me

Camp Opposit of fredericksburg VA
friday Evening July 11th 1862

Absent friend and sister and Mother i Recd yur letter this Afternoon and one from Aunt Marian and i was glad to hear from you i Was glad to get that Pen that you sent me for i have not got eny onely one that Polly Parce sent me and that is not half so good as this one is she sent it to me yesterday i am Writeng with the one you sent me and it is the Best steal Pen that i Ever saw in my life i Wish that you Would Send me one Every time you Write for i Cant get eny Pens here atall that is worth eny thing Walle nough of that i am Well and have not Seen A Sick moment Since the time wee marched Defor has hot Well and Ruged Agan now we have not got our pay yet and Dont know when wee shall get it and i guess hat wee shall have such Another time getting it as wee Did the other time i guess that you Could not read that letter that i wrote with a Pensil for it was so Dim that i Could not hardely Read it my self Wee had Batalion knapsack Drill this Afternoon but Wee did not have to Drill eny here for our Col is A first Rate man and he lets us stop and Rest once in About ten minutes and the Boys all like him tip top well the Best of eny man that wee ever saw i Cant write much this time for i have not got eny news to Write your mistaken about our mens Retreeting and leaving our dean on the ground it is so about their Retreeting for they Did retreet but it was to get the Rebels into A trap and they Did and Drove them back and licked them out but they are at it now i supose for they was the last i herd from thare you must not feel so bad About me mother for i will look out for my self give my Best Respecks to gand mother and tell her that i should like to see her vary much and Aunt Julia so to Uncle James to Mary tell Frank and Verner Blackman that if they Dont Write before long to me that i Will not Write to them When they Do to me for it has been A good while since that i Wrote to them and i begin to think that it is time that i got A letter from them if they are ever going to write to me but i shall have to Close Pretty soon for i have got to Wrtie to Aunt Marian this morning and if you Will Pleas Cary this other letter over to Aunt Marian i will be Vary much obliged to you give my best respecks to R Parce and tell him that i should like to see him vary much and i hope it Will not bee long before long but i Dont know as i ever shall see him but i must Close for i have not more than time to Write to Aunt Marian So you must excuse this short letter this time and i Will try and Do better the future part of my life about writeng for i must leave you now so good Bye untill next time this from your Sun and Brother H C Sutton to Mary L and Cathring M Sutton no more at present so good Bye all of you kiss the Children for me for i Cant

Camp opposite of fredricksburg VA
Wenedsday afternoon July 16th 1862

Dear mother i Recd your letter yesterday and was on gard so that i Could not Write untill today i was glad to hear that you are all Well out thare you sed that Con and Emma Babcock was Sick i am sorry to heare that fore health is A great blessing to all of us i am Well and tuff as A Bare for i have not Seen A Sick Day Since i have been in the State of VA i am expecting the mail along every minute but Presume that thare Will not be enything for me Blackbaries and Hucklebaries are Ripe here and thare is lots of them two i talked some of going and getting some this afternoon but it will be so late by the time that i get through Writeng that i Cant go today but i guess i Shall go tomorrow though wee have string beans for Diner yesterday and i had green Apple saues today for Dinner you Sed you Wanted me to be A good Boy well mother i will try you must not expect A vary long letter this time for i am upon gard all night last night and i am Purty tired and sleepy today so i will Close by bideng you a good bye this from your Sun and Well Wisher H C Sutton to Mrs Cathrine M Sutton Pleas write Soon to me no more at Present so good bye all of you no more at Present

Headquarters 76 Regt VA
Camp opposite of fredricksburg
July the 19th 1862

Dear father as i had an opertunity to send you A letter free of postage i thought i Would Write a few lines to let you know that i ame Well and hope you are the Same i have not got eny news to Write and if i had i should not have time to Write it i went and picked two quarts of black baries yesterday and Thomas Sharp Went With me and he got as meny as i Did and they was the nicest that i ever Saw in my life and wee got some Cucumbers and aquashes and Wee are going to Cook them to Day i Shall not have time to Write much time So you must Excuse me if i Dont Write A vary long letter this time the Drum has beat for Drill and i must Stop pleas give my best Wishes to all Enquireng friends this from Henry C Sutton

Camp Opposite of fredericksburg
thursday July 24th 1862

Dear Sister i rec your letter Day before yesterday and now i seat my self to Reply i am well and is this leaves me so may it find you in health and good Spearits i have not got eny news to Write this time So you must Excuse me if i Do not write A vary long letter this time for i have got to write to Vurner Blackman and i Shall not have time to write much this time mother i wish you would Send me About A Point of that mouth Water for the Disentary and send it Express and it Will Come safe and it will not Cost much eather and Ben said he will Pay half of the Postage you Wanted to know if i had Rec them Postage Stamps yes i got them all Right give my best Respecks to all of the People out thare and Pleas hand this other letter to Vurner Blackman for i Shall have to Close but i will try and write more next time i Wrote A letter to you and Sent it by BIll Dick but give my Love to the Children and tell them that i should like to see them Vary much but i will Close and write to Vurner this from your friend and Brother H C Sutton to Mary Sutton

Camp Neer fredericksburg
Aug 6th 1862

Dear Sister i Recd your Letter Night before Last and was glad to hear that you was all well I am Well and Harty and Enjoying my Self first Rate Wee have moved our Camp about A mile upon A hill and A nice Place wee are Drilling Every Day now and it has been the Warmest Weather for About A week that I ever Saw in my life Cant Wee have good time here it Looks as tho wee was going to have some Rain before long and I think it will be A good thing for it has been Some time since wee have had eny to Amount to eny thing i tent with Ben now Ben is Well Deforest is in Elexandria Hospatol but the last wee herd from him he was geting better but they Say he is going to have his Discharge and i am glad of that for he is hot tuff enought to stand this Solger life but i am afraid he will not get it but i hope he Will for he is a good Boy two of our boys have Returned from the hospital yesterday William Fuller and Eugene Fuller you Wanted to know who the Boys was that was Sick in the Hospitol i Dont know as i Can tell you all of them but i Will tell you all i Can of them A B Miner Hiram Warner Henry Justice David Salesbary Albert Harvey Peter Maclane and Theran Blackman Morell Fuller Burdet Fuller and Arnold Sargent Ralph Swan John Phelps Deforest George Thorenton Thomas Marten and Levi Lowel those are all i Can think of now wee Dont get eny news now and so i shall have to stop Writeng for Want of news to Write give my best Wishes to R Parce and Emma Babcock and to Uncle Lans folks and all of the Enquireng friends out thare i Dont think of eny thing so i Will Close by sayeng good Day to all of you and Love to all of you this from your friend and Brother H C Sutton Wee have not got our Pay yet and i supose you have got Prety neer out of money as Well as my Self Pleas send me two Dollars if you Can and i Will make it all Wright with you When i Draw my net Pay and that will be next Month i Expect and i Will send you all the money then i Can to By hay with i must Close now for i Cant write eny more now this from your fiend and well Wisher and sun H C Sutton to Lorenzo Sutton no more onely Pleas Write soon to me no more at Present So good Bye till next time Henrry C Sutton

Camp of the 76th Regt N.Y. Vol.
At Burstow Station, Va.
Nov. 2nd, 1863


Mr. Sutton

Dear Sir,

Enclosed please find, a letter, to me, from Mr. James A Kennedy, of Washington , in relation to a Testament which belonged to your Son,

I was present when your Son was Killed. He was a brave brave Soldier, and his death was a Severe loss to his Company and the cause, for which he was contending.

I remain,
Very Respectfully Yours,
William Cahill
2nd Lieut
Comdg Co. B

The following two letters were written on the same paper. The third letter is not signed but it was from a Sister of either Catharine or Lorenzo Sutton.

Fairfield
July 5th 1863

Dear Sister and Brother I take my pen in hand to write A few lines to you to let you know we have not forgotten you although it has been A long time since we have had A letter from you I wrote to you last fall but I did not recieve any answer I thought I would try once more time my health poor yet and Rebeccas health is not very good this summer but she is so she is round the rest are all well we lost a little boy this spring he died about 7 weeks ago he was most two months old he was always sick I want to see you very much how I would kike to come there once more and see you all and see all the folk I use to know there but I dont never exspect to I would like to have you all come and see us it has been very dry here this summer so things have most all dried up for the lack of rain Alexanders folks are all as ususal as for Bacons children I have not seen them for some time Olive and Joseph I have not seen since early last spring Sarah went from Josephes four or five weeks ago she went where Olive lives we have never seen or heard from Chester yet I must now close with love to you all I remain your well wishing Sister

Rosilla Johnson

Fairfield July 7th 1863

Dear Sister and Brother I take my pen in hand to write A few lines to you in answe to yours we recieved last week we are all well hoping these few lines wil find you all enjoying the same great blessing Joseph has bee cradleing wheat he has just begun to day Mother is about the same she is so she goes to Alexanders most ever day she says she feals better when she can walk out it is about as far from here to Alex as it is to the Parces from where you live Alexander folks is all well Alex wife cant write I want to see you all very much more than I did before I was there Franky talks about Frank and the rest of the children he has been in the field with his Father most all day I must now close as it is late it time I was abed and this has to go to the Ofice in the morning wiht much love to you all I remain your well wishing Sister

Mary D. Bailey

Write soon as you can

June the 30 1864

Dear Sister and Brother neffewes and nesses I take my pen in hand to let you no that we wer all well at present time and ancer to yours witch i reced sum time ago and i hope these few lines will find you the same bacons flds all well except Chester he has had his arm tore of in the factree Olave is maired Sarah is to work out Joseph Bacon lives about twelve miles from us Desilelo he lives to his uncel Joseph Bailey they wer well the last I herd from them Elexander he did enlist for three years or duren the war She got a letter from him yesterday he was well then his holds is well Orlandos wife is maired again She is well Ortons folks are well and thay live about 11 miles from us

Polanas husband was here about a weak ago he is well it very dry here fore want of raine we have to good Cows a yoke of oxen five hoges and five Childern I would like to See you all very much once more kiss the Childern for me is Mary living to home or not Ellen is to work out for a doller and ahaff aweak Lorenzo you had better come to to live most close so good by

Write as soon as you git this

(author unknown assume a woman who is the sister of Catharine or Lorenzo Sutton)

What happened to men of Company B during the time that Henry Sutton wrote his letters. The following was taken from the History Of Seventy-Sixth New York Volunteers by A. P. Smith, published by Truair, Smith & Miles, Printers, Syracuse, NY for the publishers Cortland, N.Y. 1867; republished by Ron R. Van Sickle Military Books, 22 Montgomery Village Avenue, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879, 1988.

Company B had 92 men enrolled in it. By the end of their first major battle, which was Second Manassas (2nd Bull Run) the following men were either dead or forced to be discharged for disability and therefore the 76th N.Y. Regiment lost their service.
Captain Oscar C. Fox wounded at Gainesville, August 28, 1862

Lieutenant W. Stuart Walcott suffered typhoid fever summer of 1862 discharged October 30, 1862

Ralph C. Swan, 4th Srgt. discharged for disability 1862

Henry L. Taylor, 5th Srgt. killed Aug 28, 1862

George H. Weeks, 4th Cpl. died summer of 1862

Harvey Yates, Wagoner died in service 1862

Chester H. Allen, pvt. killed Aug 28, 1862

Arnold Allen, pvt Feb. 1862 killed aboard Mount City when it exploded

Elbridge R. Burnham died from typhoid pneumonia spring of 1862

Joseph R. Birdlebough discharged for disability 1862

Lucien Chandler died at Camp Doubleday, D.C. of typhoid pneumonia Spring 1862

John Crozier wounded at Gainesville August 28, 1862, discharged for disability

Reuben Crumb discharged for disability spring of 1862

David J. Ellsworth diacharged fro disability April 12th, 1862 and died of such disability

Henry Finch died at Fredericksburg July 1862

Warren H. Follett died at Fairfax, Va., 1862

Eugene E. Fuller discharged for disability 1862

Nicholas Haynes discharged 1862

Edgar W. Jones died of disease after Bull Run

Peter McLean Discharged for disability 1862

Horatio G. Marble Discharged for disability 1862

Reuben H. Moon Discharged at Albany for non parental consent

DeForrest Peterson Discharged for disability 1862

John B. Parselow Discharged for disability 1862

James A. Phillips Discharged for disability

Eli E. Peck Wounded at Gainesville, Aug 28, 1862 discharged for wound

Lewis P. Pember discharged for disability

Hugh Ross killed at Gainesville August 28, 1862

Henry C. Sutton killed at Gainesville August 28, 1862

Luther Skinner died at Alexandria in 1862

David Salisbury died at Mount Pleasnat Hospital in 1862

Miles Sperry wounded at Gainesville August 28, 1862

Benson W. Wells lost an arm at Bull Run August 29, 1862 and discharged for wound

Isaac White discharged for disability February 27th, 1862

By the time that the Battle of Second Manassas was concluded, which was less than one year from the time Henry Sutton enlisted, Company B had lost by disease, wounds and death 33 men which represent over 30 percent of its original strength.


The following men were mentioned in the letters of Henry C. Sutton and are listed in chronological order: Judson is Judson E. Parce who was wounded at Bull Run and discharged for the wound in 1862

Benjaman is Benjamin F. Eaton who was wounded at Gettysburg and discharged at the expiration of term of service

Spencer Babcock

Captain Oscar C. Fox commander of Company B wounded severly at Gainesville, Va., Battle of Second Bull Run August 28, 1862

Chancey Crandel is Chauncey D. Crandall First Lieutenant Company B was wounded at South Mountain and killed by a cannon ball at Fredricksburg, December 12, 1862

Deforest Peterson is DeForrest Peterson who was discharged for disability in 1862

G Parse is Judosn E. Parce see above

Ratio is Horatio G. Marble who was discharged for diability in 1863

Charles Fallet

Nelsen DIckerson

Tom Sharp is Thomas H. Sharp who was taken prisoner and on release joined the regular army

David Brown

Jare Rogers

Steve, Stephen Benette is Stephen Bennett, Jr. a musician

John Parslo is John B. Parselow who was discharged for disability in 1862

James Spauding is James M. Spaulding who was wounded

Louis Blackman is Samuel L. Blackman, Third Sergeant who was discharged for disability in 1863

Horatio is Horatio G. Marble who was discharged for diability in 1863

Amos Miner is Amos B. Miner, third Corporal was discharged for disability; drafted back into same Co. he was taken prisoner and died at Florence, S.C., October, 1864

Elbridge R. Burnham died of typhod penumonia in spring of 1862

Chester Frank

George Smith

George W. Cross Musician discharge at expiration of term of service

Nathan Rudock is Nathan S. Ruddock who was wounded at Antietam and discharged at expiration of term of service

John Parsel is John B. Parselow was discharged for diability in 1862

Mort Johnson is Anson M.N. Johnson ?

Hiram is either Hiram G. Warner seventh Corporal who was promoted to first Sergeant; wounded at the Wilderness May 5, 1864 and taken prisoner; discharged at expirtion of term of service or Hiram D. Scranton who died at Aquia Creek December 8th, 1862

Heath

Henry Finch died at Freedericksburg July, 1862.

Chet is Chester H. Allen who was killed at Gainesville August 28th, 1862

William Fuller is William K. Fuller wounded at South Mountain; promoted to Sergeant January 14th, 1863; re-enlisted, came home on furlough, and died January 4th, 1865

Eugene E. Fuller discharged for disability 1862

Hiram Warner see Hiram G. Warner above

Henry Justice discharged at expiration of term of service

David Salesbary is David Salisbury who died at Mount Pleasant Hospital in 1862

Albert Harvey no description

Peter MacLane is Peter Mclean who was discharged for disability in 1862

Theran Blackman is Theron Blackman was discharged at expiration of term of service

Morell Fuller discharged at end of term of service

Burdet Fuller is Burdett Fuller discharged for disability April 20th, 1864

Arnold Sargent is Arnold S. Sergent discharged for disability October 18th, 1863

Ralph C. Swan fourth Sergeant; discharged for disability 1862

John H. Phelps discharged

George Thorenton is George E. Thorington was wounded on picket at Freedericksburg, December 15th, 1862, and at Gettysburg July 1st, 1863

Thomas Marten is Thomas Martin killed at Gettysburg July 2, 1864; promoted to Sergeant Major of the regiment.

Levi F. Lowell re-enlisted and remained to the end of the war

William Cahill he was wounded five times, taken prisoner three times and promoted to First Lieutenant and mustered out March 11, 1865



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