"W" to "Wh" Surname Family Sketches




From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

D. Byron Waite, Canadice, was born near his present residence in Canadice, February 29, 1828. His father, Capt. Benjamin G. Waite,  was born in Petersburg, N. Y., April 27, 1793. He was with the Eightyy Sixth New York Volunteers in the War of 1812, under General Brown on the northern frontier in this State. He married  Mary Odell, sister of the late  Mrs. Lydia Baxter, the poet, and her grandfather, Abbott, fell in the Revolutionary War. Captain B. Waite died in Canadice, January 27, 1861. Peleg, grandfather of our subject, was born in West Greenwich, R. I., in 1761, and his wife was Mary Greene, whose father was a cousin of  Gen. Nathaniel Grene of Revolutionary fame. Peleg was a descendant in the fifth generation of  Thomas of Portsmouth, R. I., who came from England in 1634 to Boston, and went to Portsmouth in 1639. D. Byron was educated at Alfred Seminary, Clinton Liberal Institute, and at the National Law School at Ballston, and was admitted to the bar at Canton, N. Y., in 1850. He went to Council Bluffs, Ia., the same year, and was readmitted in that State. In 1852 he was elected district attorney of Mills county. He practiced but a short time, when he retired permanently. He was then engaged in the service of the American Fur Company, and in crossing emigrants for the Council Bluffs Ferry Company, and for two years traveled in the wilds of Kansas, Nebraska and Dakota, buying and collecting furs. In 1853 he returned to his native town, and was elected justice of the peace, an office he has held longer than any other incumbent in the town, but was never an aspirant for any office whatever. In 1855 he married  Harriet M., daughter of  Maurice Brown, an attorney at Springwater. He removed to Hastings, Minn., but owing to the ill health of his parents he returned a year later, and has resided here ever since. He has had four children: Byron Audubon, Genevra, Buretta, and Gates Percival. The two sons are at Kettle Falls, Wash. His wife died in 1869, and he married second  Amanda M. Colvin, widow of the  Rev. W. W. Colvin, a Methodist clergyman. Early in life  Mr. Waite was a teacher in the common schools. He has devoted considerable time to collecting and writing local history, and has collected and classified the botanical subjects of his native town. He is a member of the "Ornithologists' Union," and is now engaged in writing the botanical and bird history of Canadice. In politics he is a Republican, but often votes for a competent honest Democrat rather than for a Republican of poorer qualifications. His father, Captain Waite, had four sons and two daughters, of whom  D. Byron and Edwin G.  are living of the sons. The latter was born in 1824 in Granville, Washington county, before the family came to this town. He went to California as a gold hunter in 1849, and has been a member of both branches of the State Legislature there, county treasurer of Nevada county, and during four administrations was naval officer of San Francisco, and after that chief clerk in the Mint. He is now secretary of state of California.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Dr. Robert W. Walmsley, Canandaigua, was born in Dubuque, Ia., and when but three years of age his parents moved south. Dr. Walmsley is a graduate of the University of Louisiana, from which he received his degree of M. D. His classical education was received at the University of Virginia and Randolph Macon College. He practiced five years in New York city, and then located in 1885 in Canandaigua, where he has ever since controlled a large practice. Dr. Walmsley married in 1881 Philadelphia, daughter of Dr. C. C. Beard of New Orleans. She was the granddaughter of Captain Thomas Stuart Monteith, who was one of the earliest settlers of this section, coming to Canandaigua in 1832. Dr. Walmsley has one child, Gratia Stuart. He is a member of the Ontario County Medical Society of the Society of Physicians of the village, and is a surgeon of the village police commissioners, the first incumbent of the office, newly created.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William W. Walter, Hopewell, was born in Kent county, England, June 20, 1837, the day Queen Victoria ascended the throne. He is the youngest of nine children of James and Frances (Friday) Walter, natives of England. In 1853 Mr. Walter came to America and resided with his children (who had previously emigrated) until his death in February, 1867. At the age of nine years, William began to support himself by working on a farm. At the age of fifteen years he came to America, where he continued farm work and also attended school in Madison county. He afterwards taught school two years. In 1861 he enlisted in the First N. Y. Engineer Regiment, and served three years. In November, 1864, he received his discharge, and returned to Syracuse, where he engaged in the butcher business one year, also taught school in the towns of Onondaga and La Fayette a number of terms. He then purchased a farm near Syracuse, where he resided until 1874, when he bought sixty acres known as the Parkus farm in Hopewell. He makes a specialty of dairying, and in politics is a Republican. In 1865 Mr. Walter married Mary R. Griggs, a native of Stockbridge, and the youngest of six children of J. C. and Polly (Carbin) Griggs, natives of Tolland county, Conn. Mr. Walters and wife have these children: Herbert E., Edwin O. (died in infancy), and Arthur J.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

Eldreth A. Walton, Geneva, was born in Westfield, Mass., in 1860. He received an academic education, and was in the ice business one year. He has been in the service of the American and the United States Express Companies eight years, in various positions from messenger to agent in full charge in Geneva four years. In 1886 he became an active member of a company which organized the Ontario Mutual Accident Company, also was one of the organizers of the People's Building, Loan and Savings Association, which has been a success from the beginning. In 1891 he with others organized the Torrey Park Land Company, which has accomplished much in the development and prosperity of the northern part of the village. He is also one of the promoters of the Geneva Surface Street Railway Company, which will soon be in successful operation. He is president of the Geneva Driving Club, and is one of the police commissioners. In 1884 he married Elfreda B. Covert of Geneva  Mr. Walter is one of the directors of the Geneva Medical and Surgical College, founded by the late John V. Ditmar.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

William H. Warfield, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua April 8, 1835. The family is of English extraction, and were early settlers of Maryland. The father, William, was born in Montgomery county, Maryland, where William was reared and educated in the common schools. In 1828 the family came to Ontario county and settled in Manchester, where his father died in 1847. In 1834 William bought 114 acres in Canandaigua, where he died in 1881. He was an enthusiastic Republican, and was one of the strong old-fashioned Methodists. He had many friends and few enemies. He married in 1831 Lucinda, daughter of Leonard Knapp of Hopewell, by whom he had two children: Susan C., who married John H. Jones of Hopewell, removed to Michigan where she died November 3, 1886; and William H.  Mr. Warfield is a Republican, and was justice of the peace of the town of Farmington, N. Y., from January, 1864, until 1881. In 1872 he was elected justice of sessions and re-elected in 1873, and has held some of the minor town offices. He has been secretary of the Ontario County Agricultural Society for nine years, and is a member, trustee and treasurer of the Methodist Church. He married June 8, 1859, Anna Eliza, daughter of Daniel and Lydia L. (Brown) Smith, of Farmington. They have two children: Dora A., wife of Justin E. Newman of Canandaigua; and Edith L., who lives at home.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

Zadock Warfield, Hopewell, was born in 1808, February 15, in Montgomery county, Md., and came to this State in 1828.  He married Chloe, second daughter of Leonard Knapp, December 20, 1832. He was the fourth child of Zadock and Rachel Warfield. His grandfather, Birce Warfield, was born in Anna Arundel Co., Md., and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  He gave his sword to his grandson at the age of six years, being in his, Zadock's, possession up to April, 1893, when he transferred it to H. J. Warfield, of Mason, Mich. This was the wish of his grandfather that it be handed down from one generation to another, as long as there was a Warfield left, or to coming posterity.  Zadock Warfield, jr., moved from his native State to the town of Manchester with his parents at the age of twenty years, living with his father until he married, and soon after moved to the town of Hopewell, where he has since lived at the old homestead, fifty-seven years. In the spring of 1893 he moved to Shortsville; is now living with his daughters, his wife having crossed the river August 17, 1889, in her seventy-seventh year. They lived to celebrate their golden wedding, December 20, 1882. Eight children blessed this union, all of whom are now living: Leonard K., Mary E., Clementine, Louesa J., Zadock W., Henry J., Eugene E., and Isabell C.  Nineteen grandchildren were born to them, all but one (a twin babe) lived to bless this union, and three great-grandchildren are now living.  Mr. Warfield is a Republican, he was also a devout Methodist, as also his wife, and endured the hardships of pioneer life. He lived to see the dense forest exchanged far out to fertile fields.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

Henry D. Warner, Phelps, was born on the Hiram Warner homestead in Phelps, he being one of four children of Hiram and Mary (Knapp) Warner, both of whom were born in the town of Hopewell. The grandfather, Rufus, came from Conway, Mass., and settled in Hopewell in early life. Henry D. married in January, 1875, Frances B. Spear, of Clifton Springs, a daughter of James and Mary (Baggerly) Spear, whose ancestors were Maryland people. They have three children: Belle, Earle Spear, and Theodore Henry. The farms of Mr. Warner comprise 205 acres, used for grain and general crops, with fifteen acres of orchard.



From Phelps Citizen 27 March 1890

Deacon Jesse Warner came to Phelps from Massachusetts in 1795. He took up land on Warner Hill to the east of Orleans. He was ever a leader in all which was the welfare of the people. He was a promoter and supporter of the Baptist church He died August 14th, 1834, aged 85 years, and his wife, Sarah, died in 1826, aged 79 years. They had a large family. Among them were were Lewis, Elijah, Rufus, Oliver, Jesse and John. Lucinda became the wife of Elisha Peck and they were the parents of the last Hon. Lewis Peck. These all became prominent workers in the affairs of the church and community, and are information of them is far too meager. The Hon. Ulysses was a son of John Warner and resides at the ancient homestead. He could give the readers of THE CITIZEN many points of interest relating to the town of Phelps.



From Phelps Citizen 27 March 1890

Jonathan Warner, born in Phelps in 1808, resides at Mineral Ridge, O. He is still in very good health and has an interest in the old time affairs of Phelps. His father, Asher Warner, was one of the soldiers in the last war with England, and was killed at the battle of Sodus, in June 1813. The youthful days of young Jonathan were full of hardships. His mother died when he was only a year or two old, and he was but five when his father was killed. His brother Daniel was 13 years old when his father was killed, went to Sodus Point, from where the family lived in Sodus, having removed from Phelps and brought the body home for burial. The death of the soldier father is vividly remembered by Mr. Warner. The family was poor. The children were placed out, a girl with _____ Crittenden of Geneva, and another girl with John Taylor, below Oaks Corners. Mr. Warner was brought up by uncles, mostly by his uncle, Charles Field of Sodus. A few years ago, Mr. Warner had erected in the Brick Church cemetery at Sodus a monument of his father, with the following inscription: "In memory of Asher Warner, who fell at the battle of Sodus June 12th, (should be June 19th,) 1813, while fighting in defense of his country." Mr. Warner in 1883 wrote a very interesting letter upon these incidents to the Hon. Lewis H. Clark, who incorporated them in his military history of Wayne county.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

Milton Warner, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, November 21, 1824.  His father was Oliver, son of Elijah, a native of Conway, Mass., who had seven sons and one daughter.  About 1800 he came to Phelps, where he spent the remainder of his life.  Oliver Warner was born in Massachusetts, December 28, 1782.  When a young man he came to Hopewell and located on 300 acres of land, where he lived and died.  His wife was Lucinda Rice, a native of Conway, Mass., born October 7, 1783. To them were born seven sons and two daughters.  Mr. Warner was drafted in the War of 1812.  His death was caused by a stroke of lightning while on a visit to his native place.  Milton Warner was four years old when his father died and he resided with his mother until twenty-four, when he married, after which his mother resided with him until her death in 1869.  Mr. Warner was educated in common schools and Canandaigua Academy.  His wife is Margaret Knapp, a native of Hopewell, and daughter of Halstead Knapp, whose father, David Knapp, came from Harveston, Rockland county, and settled in Hopewell. Mr. Warner is a Democrat, and has been assessor one term, and inspector of elections.  He is a member of Hopewell Grange No. 79.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rufus Warner, Phelps, was born in Hopewell, February 26, 1833, son of Hiram and Mary Jane (Knapp) Warner, both natives of Hopewell. The grandfather, Rufus Warner, was born in Conway, Mass., and came to Hopewell when a young man, he being one of the early settlers. Hiram, the father, always lived and died in Ontario county. Rufus Warner married in February, 1860, Charlotte W. Rice, of Michigan, daughter of Horace and Julia (Wheat) Rice. They have four children: Henry Rice, Elmer Everett, Frank Wheat, and Morris E. Mr. Warner has lived in Phelps since he was three years of age. His farm of 114 acres produces mostly wheat, barley, oats, potatoes and corn. He has also a fine apple orchard.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;
 
William G. Warr was born in Saginaw, Mich., on December 31, 1889, the son of Samuel and Louisa Warr. He was educated at public schools in Cleburne, Texas, and the Little Rock, Ark., High School. He graduated from the Chicago Y. M. C. A College with the class of 1914. In 1907 he entered Y. M. C. A. work at Little Rock, Ark., and has continued in this field in various cities up to the present time. On September 26, 1922, Mr. Warr became general secretary of the Geneva Y. M. C. A., a position he now holds. On October 21, 1914, Mr. Warr was married to Versa Edna Gregory. They have three children, Samuel, Gregory Gordon and Versa Lou Warr.



From Phelps Citizen 29 January 1903

Almer Warren resided just west of the village, Flint creek dividing his farm. His wife, Caroline, died in 1867, aged 57 years. He soon removed to Tecumseh, Mich., where he died in 1869, aged 73 years. They had one son, Amander, who married in 1861 Mary Eacker, and had one son, Bert L. Mrs. Warren, securing a divorce, married second in 1885 Abram T. Kanouse. Amander perhaps married again and we think has since died, although in this we may be mistaken.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Samuel Warth, Geneva, was born in the city of New York, on July 9, 1832. He was the son of Conrad and Margaret Warth, who came to Geneva in 1851, bringing two of their children: John S. and Samuel. The latter is the only survivor of the family now in Geneva, and although he began life with but little encouraging prospects, he is now a leading grocer of Geneva and a successful business man. His wife was Margaret E. Everson, by whom he has had three children, only one of whom, however, is now living. In politics Mr. Warth is a Democrat, but not active.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles W. Washburn, Gorham, was born in Gorham on the farm now owned by the Joshua Washburn estate. He is a son of Joshua, a son of Isaac, a native of Herkimer county and one of the pioneers of Gorham, settling near Rushville in an early day, where he lived and died. Joshua was born in Gorham in 1802. His first wife was Christine Wagner, and they had three children. His second wife was Phoebe Ketchim of Pittstown, Rensselaer county, born in 1815. She was one of twelve children of Joseph and Ollie (Venesse) Ketchim. By the second marriage Mr. Washburn had five sons and two daughters. He was poor-master and assessor many years, and owned 124 acres at his death, April 11, 1879. Charles W. was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. Farming has been his life occupation. He is a Democrat, and a member of Reed's Corners Grange and Rushville Masonic Lodge, also a member of Reed's Corners Agricultural Society and Rushville Agricultural Society.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John W. Washburn, Gorham, was born on the farm he now owns January 15, 1829.  His father was Richard, a son of Isaac and Sarah Washburn, of Eastern, who had eight children. About 1809 the latter settled in Gorham on the farm now owned by Mr. Thomas, where he died. His family, except one son that died in the West, live in Gorham and Canandaigua. Richard Washburn was born in Eastern as was also his wife, Elizabeth Francisco.  Richard Washburn and wife have four sons and four daughters, of whom two are living: John W., and Mrs. Emeline Ketcham. About 1811 Mr. Washburn settled on eighty acres of the Phelps and Gorham purchase. He was a Whig in politics and was highway commissioner a number of years. He died in Gorham, June 22, 1868, and his wife in 1855. John W. was educated in the common schools and in Rushville Academy.  February 16, 1871, he married Mary C., daughter of George Y. Daines, a native of Torrey, who now resides at Dresden at the age of eighty-three years. Her grandfather was Jesse Daines, an early settler of Torrey. Mr. Washburn has always been a farmer and has dealt extensively in sheep. He is a Democrat in politics, has been commissioner of highways six years in succession, and is now assessor. He is a member of Rushville Lodge No. 377 F. & A. M., and he and family attend and support the M. E. Church at Rushville, N. Y.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Grove R. Watson, Geneva, was born in the town of Seneca, Ontario county, November 26, 1868, was educated in the common schools of Geneva, and is associated with William Wilson in the nursery business, under the firm name of William Wilson & Co., of Geneva.  Mr. Watson's father, John, was born in the town of Benton, Yates county, was a farmer by occupation, and married Mary Whedon of the town of Seneca.  They had two children:  Grove R. and Margaret E., who died at the age of seven years.  Mr. Watson's father died in 1874 and his mother in 1882.  Mr. Watson is a member of the Knights of Pythias, also of the Algonquin Club.  Some of his ancestors were in the Revolutionary War.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Nelson Webb, West Bloomfield, was born in West Bloomfield, April 15, 1838. His father, John, was born in Lunenburg, Vt., in 1796, and came at the age of fifteen years with his father, Charles, to West Bloomfield. John Webb married Nancy Gillett, a native of Lynn, Mass., who emigrated when a young girl with her parents to Detroit. Her mother was a sister of Reynold Peck. When Detroit was captured by the British and Indians in the War of 1812, she, with others, was made prisoner and held captive about six months. Later she was sent to Lima to school, and while there made the acquaintance of her future husband. They had six children, who grew to maturity: Mary, John, Jane, Emily, Gray and Homer, all living. George worked for his father and attended the schools until of age. In 1863 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-eighth New York Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, participating in all of the nineteen engagements of that regiment. In 1860 he married Mary Fitch of LeRoy, and they had one son, William, born September 2, 1861, who lives near by, and is a poultry dealer. In the spring of 1868 Mr. Webb and his brother, Homer, purchased a half interest in the drain tile factory at Factory Hollow. He soon after acquired Homer's interest, and a little later the remaining half of W. Tack Siver, and he has conducted the business alone, except for a year or two. Mr. Webb averages about 250,000 to 300,000 annually. His sales are mostly in Ontario, Livingston and Monroe counties. Mr. Webb has a farm of eighty acres in Lima, Livingston county.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edward B. Webster, Geneva, was born in Geneva, September 2, 1844, and was the son of the late Horace Webster, professor of mathematics in Hobart College, and afterwards president of the College of the City of New York.  He died in Geneva in 1870, leaving two children:  Margaret W., wife of William Slosson, and Edward B., the subject of this sketch.  In April 1861, Edward enlisted in the second company of the Seventh Regiment of N. Y. thirty day men, and afterward re-enlisted for three years in Company E, of the One Hundred and Sixty-fifth N. Y. Vols.  Mr. Webster entered the service as a private, and by promotion was commissioned second lieutenant, first lieutenant and eventually captain of his company, and holding the latter was mustered out during the fall of 1865.  Returning to Geneva, Captain Webster engaged in farming for several years, and later became connected with the village gas works.  In 1881 he was appointed postmaster at Geneva, and served one term. In 1885 he was elected secretary of the Phillips & Clark Stove Company, a position he still holds.  In 1867 Mr. Webster was married to Helen Farr, by whom he has had seven children, six of whom are still living. 



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Horace Webster was for many years professor of mathematics in the Geneva College. Afterwards was president of the Free Academy of College of New York of New York City, but finally returned to Geneva and was the senior professor in Hobart College at the time of his death. He resided on the southwest corner of Main and Hamilton Streets.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Harris Welch, Canandaigua, was born in Erie, Pa., December 15, 1862, a son of Edwin H. and Elizabeth H. (Fidler) Welch. Edwin H. was born in Johnstown, Pa., and was educated for a civil engineer in the Polytechnic Institute at Troy, N. Y., and has always followed this profession, with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company much of the time. He is now living at Lock Haven, Pa. He has three children: Lizzie Helena, Paul Herbert, an artist, and William H. The boyhood of the latter was spent in Lock Haven, where his parents moved before he was two years old. He was educated in the common schools and at the State Normal School at Lock Haven, and spent six years in study and practice with his father. In the summer of 1879 he was chairman of an engineer corps, which was his first start, and was employed on railroad location and construction work from 1880 to 1885. In February, 1885, he went to Elmira, and in June, 1885, came to Canandaigua, where he has since made his home, holding the position of supervisor of the Canandaigua Division of the Northern Central Railway since September 1, 1891. He married, October 10, 1888, Grace G., daughter of the Hon. John Raines, and they are the parents of three daughters: Catherine Elizabeth, Edith Helena, and Grace Pauline.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Henri E. Wells, son of Samuel and Emma Wells, was born in Newark, Ohio, Sept. 14, 1843. He was educated in the public schools and when eighteen years old enlisted at Moline, Ill., in the Nineteenth Illinois Infantry for service in the Civil War. He served with ability in the quartermaster's department and participated in the battles of Stone River and Nashville, Tenn. A wound necessitated the amputation of one arm and he was honorably discharged in 1863. Returning to Moline, Ill., he engaged in business. He was elected town collector and for several years was postmaster at Moline. In 1877 he removed to Tampa, Fla., and for nine years conducted an orange grove returning north in 1886. He established his residence in Geneva and retired permanently from business. He died Nov. 1, 1927.



From Phelps Citizen 27 March 1890

Mr. Cornelius Westfall was born in 1753. He died in 1826. He was found in the woods ready to expire, and it is thought a limb of a tree fell upon him. His wife died about this same time. The had but one son, Jacob, born January 28th, 1779, who married Delanah Westbrook in 1796. To them were born were born five children, Catherine, born 1799, Cornelius, born 1800, Samuel, born 1802, Benjamin, born 1804, and Albert, born 1806.  Jacob Westfall was killed at the battle of Queenstown, October 16th, 1812. The family have ever resided on the paternal estate. There was a James Westfall in Phelps previous to 1795, who may have been a brother to Cornelius.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edwin Weyburn, M. D., Geneva, son of Samuel Weyburn, was born in this county in 1818. He studied medicine with Dr. Jedediah Smith of Geneva and graduated from the Geneva Medical College about 1850, practicing here until his death in 1879. Henry D., son of Edwin, was born in Geneva in 1845, studied medicine with his father and attended the Geneva Medical College during 1869-70, and in 1876 graduated from the Cincinnati Medical College, and has practiced here ever since. He is a Republican, and has been coroner three years, taking an active interest in politics. Dr. H. D. Weyburn was in Chicago during 1871-72 and was an eye witness to the great fire. He has practiced in Geneva twenty-one years.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Corydon Wheat. Among the pioneers of Ontario County was Benjamin Wheat, Sr., who was born at Conway, Massachusetts, April 1, 1744. His ancestors were of English descent and were among the earlier settlers. Benjamin Wheat, Sr., served in the Revolutionary War and settled on land purchased by him from the Phelps & Gorham Tract. Benjamin Wheat, Jr., the father of Corydon Wheat, was born April 1, 1781, and on January 30, 1805, married Luany Sprague of Sharon, Connecticut. Corydon was born June 4, 1824, at the old homestead near the village of Orleans, and which is said to have been the first brick house built in that section of the country. Corydon Wheat was educated at Lima Seminary and came to Geneva in the year 1845, and from that time until his death in 1890 occupied a prominent position in the community. He was a director in the Geneva and Southwestern Railroad and prominent in the movement which led to the building of this road. His capital, to a large extent, established and for many years maintained, the Geneva Gas Lighting System, and he was also largely interested in the Water Works before it was taken over by the City. For more than thirty years Mr. Wheat was a member of the Board of Education, and he was for many years, and up to the time of his death, a member of the Cemetery Commission. His judgment and good taste were manifest in the laying out of Glenwood Cemetery.

He was a member of Trinity Church and of the Masonic Fraternity. In 1857 he became Master of Ark Lodge and is said to have been one of its best presiding officers. Mr. Wheat was one of the founders of the Geneva Optical Company and before this concern was merged into the Standard Optical Company was its president. He helped to establish the First National Bank and was for many years one of its Board of Directors. He was the father of Henry A. Wheat, who is still one of Geneva's best known citizens. On the first of September 1852, Mr. Wheat was married to Emilie A., daughter of Loren Walton Lacy. They had four children, only one of whom, Henry Axtell Wheat, is now living. Corydon Wheat died December 24, 1890.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Henry Axtell Wheat, son of Corydon and Emilie Lacy Wheat, was born in Geneva May 28, 1859. He was educated in the local public schools and at Hobart College, from which institution he was graduated in the class of 1884. Following his graduation he read law in the offices of Charles N. Hemiup, but soon became interested in and took an active part in the organization of a number of Geneva's leading manufacturing industries. Mr. Wheat is president of the Summit Foundry Co., president of the Geneva Preserving Company and vice-president and one of the founders of the Geneva Savings Bank, director of the Geneva Trust Company and several other corporations; vice-president of the Geneva Free Library, a trustee of Hobart and William Smith Colleges; also a member of numerous organizations, including the patriotic societies, the Society of Colonial Wars and the Sons of the American Revolution, and he is also a member of the Huguenots Society of America.

Mr. Wheat was especially interested in the establishment in Geneva of the Young Men's Christian Association more than forty years ago and was its president for twenty-five years. He is a member of the present board of directors. He is also a member of the State executive board of the Y. M. C. A. This board, with offices in New York City, has the care and general direction of all the associations of this state.

Mr. Wheat has been a member of the session of the North Presbyterian church for many years. He is also a member of the Kappa Delta Society and the Society of the Genesee. He is a Mason and a member of the Rotary Club. For several years Mr. Wheat was a member of the Common Council and for four years he served on the Board of Public Works. Mr. Wheat married Miss Nellie Maxwell, daughter of Thompson C. Maxwell. The Wheat residence is at 584 South Main street.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Van Buren Wheat, Phelps, was born in Phelps on the family homestead December 21, 1834, son of Sidney (born in Phelps December 27, 1809) and Rebecca (Waggoner) Wheat of Mifflinsburg, Pa. Benjamin, the grandfather, was born in Conway, Mass., March 25, 1781, and came to New York when a boy. V. B. Wheat married, May 11, 1865, Ann Janette Stoughtenburg, of Hopewell, daughter of Isaac and Ann Stoutenburg. They had four children: Rollin L., Anna R., Elsie W., and Sidney I.  Mr. Wheat and his son, R. L., own a farm of 150 acres, about forty of which are devoted to fruit culture. They have a vineyard of twenty-three acres in full bearing and very productive. They are also engaged in breeding and raising horses for the market. Mr. Wheat is one of the representative citizens of the town.  



From History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub 1911, Vol II, pg. 457 - 458

Benjamin Wheeler, progenitor of the branch of the family now under consideration, was a native of Massachusetts, his birth occurring February 7, 1764. In early manhood, in 1800, accompanied by his wife and children, he removed to New York state, settling on the farm now owned by his grandson, Simeon R. Wheeler, in East Bloomfield, Ontario county, and he also erected the first grist mill in South Bloomfield. He was active and public-spirited, served in the Revolutionary war, and in all ways performed his part faithfully and conscientiously. He married, July 28, 1782, Celia Buffington, born in Massachusetts, August 26, 1762, who bore him six sons and four daughters. Benjamin Wheeler died February 6, 1836.

Thanks to Cheri Branca for this donation.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John B. Wheeler, East Bloomfield, was born in East Bloomfield, August 10, 1833. His father, John Harvey, was a son of Benjamin, and was born in Massachusetts, March 16, 1795, coming to East Bloomfield when five years of age. His wife was Betsey A. Lee, a native of East Bloomfield, born in March, 1795, and they had five sons and seven daughters, of whom two sons and three daughters survive. Betsey A. was a daughter of Amos Lee, a native of Massachusetts, and one of the first settlers of East Bloomfield. Mr. Wheeler became an extensive real estate owner, though at his death he owned but 200 acres.  Mr. Wheeler was an active republican, but not an office seeker.  He was a strong temperance man, and assisted largely in building the Baptist and Universalist churches at Baptist Hill. He died in June, 1871. John B. was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. He and his brother Nathan rented the homestead until 1861, when he purchased the farm of 200 acres, where he has since resided. He has made improvements at a cost $10,000, having built a fine residence in 1878.  Mr. Wheeler is an active Republican, but has always declined office. He attends and supports the Universalist Church. March 8, 1855, he married Achsah M., daughter of Royal A. Andrews, of Bristol, and they have three children: George A., Jesse A., and Edith A. Edith A. died at the age of five years. George A. was educated at East Bloomfield Academy and Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, and is a farmer of East Bloomfield. He married M. Belle, daughter of Benjamin F. Hicks, and has four children: Edith, Ralph H., Margaret, and Leah. Jesse A. was educated in Canandaigua Academy and Genesee Wesleyan Seminary. He began teaching at seventeen years, and has been following it in connection with farming since. In 1886 he married Katie, daughter of William L. Rowe, of Columbia county, and they have two children: Charles R., and Bessie.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Oscar F. Wheeler, West Bloomfield, was born in Bristol, February 4, 1831, a son of Addison H. and Lucy P. (Remington) Wheeler. The grandfather, George A., a pioneer of Geneseo, ran a ferry on the Genesee River, and also conducted a hotel. He died in East Bloomfield in 1837, at the age of sixty years. His wife was Phoebe Wheeler, by whom he had several children. Addison H. was born in Geneseo, Livingston county, in 1806, and came to East Bloomfield with his parents, where he lived on the homestead all his life, excepting ten years spent in Canandaigua. He bought the farm of fifty-two acres where subject now resides, also 225 acres in Livingston county. He was a Republican and died in 1872. His wife died about 1886. She was born in Canandaigua, a daughter of Thaddeus Remington and Betsey Nelson, and she had nine children: Oscar F., Martha, who died aged twelve, Thaddeus R., Rob H., Edward R., Ulysses M., Ellen E., Lillian and another. Mr. Wheeler left a large property at his death. Oscar F. was raised on a farm and had a district and seminary education. At the age of twenty-one years he began life for himself where he now resides, in company with his father, which they continued three years, then his brother took an interest, and at twenty-seven he sold to his father. He married and moved to Bergen, Genesee county, where he bought sixty-five acres of land and lived eleven years. He then sold out and lived in Byron seven years. In 1878 he bought 152 acres, where he now lives, and on which he has made many improvements. He married, February 24, 1859, Lucy S. Rowley, born in Rush, Monroe county, a daughter of R. and Lucy (Hayward) Rowley of East Bloomfield, and Mr. Wheeler and wife have had eight children: Heber E., Stoughton R., Lucy D., wife of Charles Hobson; Oscar F., Rob H., Alice A., wife of Arthur Buell; Ellen E., and Jerome M.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robert H. Wheeler, East Bloomfield, was born June 3, 1837, a son of Addison H., a son of Major George A. Wheeler, who was a son of Joshua and Rebecca (Snow) Wheeler, natives of Connecticut. Major George A. was a native of Connecticut, born April 21, 1777. About 1800 he came to East Bloomfield, and there married Phoebe, daughter of Benjamin Wheeler, and had twelve children, nine survive. Mr. Wheeler was in the War of 1812, and once kept a tavern in Lakeville, Livingston county, but in 1826 settled on a farm of 180 acres in East Bloomfield. He died in 1835, and his wife in 1849. Addison H. was born in Livingston county in 1806, and married Lucy P. Remington of Canandaigua, born in 1810, a daughter of Thaddeus and Betsey (Root) Remington, early settlers there. Mr. Wheeler and wife had six sons and three daughters, all living except one daughter, who died young. Mr. Wheeler was a farmer, and at one time owned 500 acres of land. He was a Republican, and died in East Bloomfield February 29, 1872, and his wife April 5, 1884. Robert H. Wheeler received a common school education, and has made farming his life occupation. In 1865 he bought the farm he now owns of 242 acres, on which he has erected buildings and made other improvements at a cost of $5,000. He is a Republican, and through his efforts a post-office was established, in 1892, known as "Wheeler's Station."  Mr. Wheeler has been highway commissioner three years, and was elected sheriff of Ontario county in 1886. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294, F. & A. M.  January 28, 1858, he married Elizabeth A. Miller of East Bloomfield, one of two daughters of Spencer C. and Ann C. (Cater) Miller, he a native of Canandaigua, born May, 1815, and she was born in Ulster county, May 15, 1815, and came to East Bloomfield with her parents, Peter and Mary Jansen Cater, to live when five years old. Mary Jansen Cater was a descendant of Roeloff and Anneka Webber Jansen, of which quite a history is given in Harper's New Monthly Magazine, No. 420, May, 1885.  Spencer C. was a son of Jesse and Eunice Morley Miller, natives of Connecticut, who came to Canandaigua.  Eunice Morley Miller was a daughter of Timothy and Eunice Bissel Morley of Connecticut. To subject and wife were born three children: Marcia R., Lizzie J. and Horace G.  Marcia R. is the wife of Willis E. Lee of East Bloomfield. In 1885 Mr. Lee put up a cider mill at Wheeler Station, and has since done an extensive business as a produce dealer. Lizzie Jansen Wheeler is the wife of Charles B. Green of Red Creek, Wayne county. They had one son, Avery W., who died April 10, 1893, aged 10 months.  Horace G. is also a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294, F. & A. M., also of Canandaigua Lodge No. 245, K.of P.  His occupation is that of a locomotive engineer. In the fall of 1892 he married Maude S. Benham, a native of East Bloomfield, and daughter of Chester Benham, of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Simeon R. Wheeler, East Bloomfield, was born in East Bloomfield, December 28, 1817. His father was Benjamin D., a son of Benjamin, a native of Massachusetts, born February 7, 1764, who married Celia Buffington July 28, 1782. She was born in Massachusetts August 26, 1762. Benjamin had six sons and four daughters. In 1800 Mr. Wheeler and wife came to East Bloomfield, and settled on the farm now owned by Simeon R. He was an extensive land owner, and built the first grist-mill in South Bloomfield. He was also in the Revolutionary War. He died February 6, 1836. Benjamin D. was born in Massachusetts April 10, 1889. He came to East Bloomfield and married Deborah Reed, born February 19, 1809. Mr. Wheeler and wife had two sons and three daughters. He died September 30, 1818, and his wife married second, John Pool, and they had three daughters and a son. Mr. Pool died January 7, 1860, and Mrs. Pool died in 1878. Simeon R. was educated in the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary. April 2, 1839, he married Betsey Bently, born in Richmond in 1819, a daughter of Isaac Bently and Hannah Dubois of Saratoga county, N. Y., who came to Richmond in 1816. He died January 10, 1863, and his wife April 12, 1855. Subject and wife have had one daughter, Gertrude, who married Theron P. Buell in 1858. She died May 30, 1859. Mr. Buell was born August 10, 1834, and died May 28, 1889.  Wife of subject died May 9, 1878, and November 5, 1879, he married second Clara (Daily) Hinman, widow of Elijah S. Hinman, by whom she had four daughters. She was a daughter of William Daily of Chemung county, and his wife was Clara C. Cunningham, daughter of George Cunningham of Scotland, an early settler of Chemung county, N. Y.  Mr. Wheeler has always been one of the leading farmers of the town, and owns 253 acres of land. Mr. Wheeler was a Whig, and is now a Republican.  He voted for William Harrison, and has twice voted for his grandson.  He has always been active in politics, and has been commissioner of highways six years, assessor seventeen years, justice of the peace three years, and superintendent of the county poor for twenty-one years.  Mr. Wheeler was a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge of East Bloomfield, and of the Monumental Lodge of Good Templars of Bristol. He has for fifty years been an active worker in the Universalist church of Baptist Hill, and many years trustee. Mr. Wheeler was appointed postmaster at South Bloomfield when office was organized in 1882, and has since held that office.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Sylvester H. Wheeler, Bristol, was born in Livonia, January 18, 1829, and is a son of Sylvester Wheeler, a son of Aaron Wheeler, a native of Massachusetts. Sylvester Wheeler was born in Dighton, Mass., in 1778. In 1795 he came to Richmond, and after several years went to Livonia and there owned a farm.  n 1832 he came to Bristol and purchased the farm subject now owns. Mr. Wheeler was twice married, first to Thankful Spencer, by whom he had nine children. Mrs. Wheeler died in 1828, and Mr. Wheeler married Mrs. Betsey Hicks Marsh, by whom he had five children. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was wounded at Black Rock. He died October 28, 1833, and his wife September 15, 1889. Subject of sketch was educated in Canandaigua Academy. At the age of sixteen years, he taught school, and at the age of twenty-one years, he engaged in the mercantile business at Bristol, and was there several years when he went to South Bloomfield and purchased the grist-mill now owned by Mr. Cooper.  After three years he went to Texas, where he remained three years and assisted in establishing the Butterfield overland mail route. In 1861 he returned to Bristol and has since been engaged in farming. He was also in the mercantile business from 1870-1889. Mr. Wheeler has been twice married, first October 15, 1848, to Mary P. Cudworth of Bristol, daughter of Ezekiel Cudworth. They had seven children: Isabella, Roswell, Florence, Wallace, Horatio (deceased), Nathaniel and Arthur. Mrs. Wheeler died December 19, 1870, and December 30, 1871, Mr. Wheeler married Sarina Cleveland of Naples, daughter of Wheeler G. and Julia (Parks) Cleveland.  Mr. Wheeler's second wife bore him four children: Sylvester H., Mabel E., Roland E., and R. Leslie, all of whom are living.  Mr. Wheeler is a Republican and has been superintendent of schools two years, and was supervisor four years. He and family attend the Universalist church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thaddeus R. Wheeler, Canandaigua, was born in East Bloomfield, was born March 30, 1835. His grandfather, George A., a son of Joshua Wheeler, was a native of Connecticut, who came to this State about 1800 and finally moved to Bloomfield. He married a daughter of Benjamin Wheeler, a native of Massachusetts, and they had nine children, of whom Addison H. was born February 13, 1806. He married, November 1829, Lucy P., daughter of Thaddeus Remington, a farmer of Canandaigua, and bought a farm of 130 acres on the town line of Canandaigua, after six years moving on to the old homestead farm, where he died in 1869. Mr. Wheeler was a Republican, and a young man of public spirit, always ready to support every good object.  He had nine children, all but one now living on farms in this county. A daughter died when eleven years old. Thaddeus spent his youth on the farm, and was educated in Bloomfield Academy. He assisted his father on the farm until about twenty-four years old when, in partnership with his brother Oscar, he bought a farm in Bloomfield, which they owned three years. He worked for his father on different farms until he was thirty-one, and then bought the Bloomfield farm back. In 1881 he bought the Sanders farm of 100 acres in Canandaigua, moving into the old Joshua R. Giddings house, which was the first frame house built west of the village. Since coming here Mr. Wheeler has erected a beautiful residence, new barns, etc., making now a very valuable property. He married, April 6, 1864, Augusta E., daughter of Nathaniel B. Stanton of Steuben county, and they have two sons: Walter S., who conducts a farm in Canandaigua; and Wells J., who lives on the homestead. The latter was born July 17, 1868, educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy, and married in 1887 Grace S. Collins, and they have two children: Roy W. and Sarah E.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Royal Wheelock, West Bloomfield, was born July 16, 1766, and was among the first settlers of the town of West Bloomfield. He came from Uxbridge, Mass., with his wife, daughter Betsey, son Harry, and in company with Captain Robert Taft, settled in West Bloomfield in 1793. He was a descendant in the sixth generation of Ralph Wheelock, who was born in Shropshire, Eng., in 1600 and came to this country in 1638 with his wife, a daughter and a son, and settled in Medfield, Mass.He was one of the first selectman of that town, and held many offices of trust. Royal Wheelock married Lydia Taft, daughter of Captain Robert Taft, and died in West Bloomfield November 24, 1856. His wife, born May 22, 1774, died January 13, 1847. Their children were: Betsey, born January 23, 1790, married Otis Thompson and died in West Bloomfield; Harry, born October 20, 1792, married Judith Gillett and died in Leicester, N. Y.; Nancy, born January 16, 1796, married Hon. Reynold Peck in June, 1817, and is now living in West Bloomfield, aged ninety-seven years; Silas, born May 14, 1799, married Almira Durrant and died in Salem, Mich., March 17, 1869; Royal, born April 15, 1801, married Ann Pinckney and died in Salem, Mich., December 22, 1876; Robert T., born March 3, 1803, married Mary J. Murray, and died in Superior, Mich., September 27, 1848; Ira T., born September 25, 1805, died unmarried in Leicester, N. Y., June 16, 1829; Ann, born September 27, 1811, married Elijah Niles, and is now living at Alfred, N. Y.; John R., born December 5, 1808, married first, Rhoda, and second, Deborah Plimpton, and died in West Bloomfield in 1889; Jerry L., born December 13, 1817, married Mary Allen April 27, 1847, and died at Ovid, Mich., November 7, 1890. Mrs. Nancy Peck was among the first white children born in Bloomfield, and is now the oldest inhabitant. She recalls many reminiscences of the pioneer days.  For many years after her marriage a large portion of the clothing of her family was spun and woven by her hands. 



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Edward White kept the Farmers' Inn on the east side of Main Street some distance south of Washington Street. He was succeeded by David Wilson, who erected what was known as the Towler Building, where he kept a hotel for many years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Captain George White, Phelps, was born in Scotland, May 16, 1803. He early adopted a seafaring life, and at fourteen years began as cabin boy. At the age of twenty-one, he became captain, and for forty years followed the sea. At the age of thirty-one he married Euphemia Gibson, sister of John Gibson, one of the noted men of Phelps, who did much for the improvement of the village (the present Gibson block, now owned by the White family, having been built by him). Captain White and wife came to this country thirty-five years ago and settled in Phelps, on the farm where they ever afterwards made their home, and where they celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage in 1884. Captain White died at his home April 29, 1893, as the age of eighty-nine years, leaving a wife and five children, three sons and two daughters. One son died in Phelps in 1866. John Gibson died a bachelor in August, 1864, having been in his life time largely engaged in malting and distilling.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Oliver H. White, East Bloomfield, a native of Dutchess county, was born August 22, 1830. His father, Walter, was a son of Anthony, a native of Germany, who came to Dutchess county in 1792. He married Mary Hall of his own county, by whom he had five sons and two daughters. In 1836 Mr. White came to Monroe county where he died. He and wife belonged to the Society of Friends. His death occurred in 1872, and his wife in 1877. Oliver H. was educated in Brockport Academy. October 9, 1855, he married E. M. Ewer, a native of Monroe county, and daughter of Edwin Ewer, whose father, Isaac, was one of the first settlers of Mendon, Monroe county. Oliver H. is a general farmer. In 1867 he came to East Bloomfield and purchased 115 acres, which he has greatly improved. He makes a specialty of breeding Langshan fowls, Jersey cattle and Cheshire swine. He was a Republican from the organization of that party until the organization of the People's party, when he joined the latter. Mr. White is a member of Miller's Corners Lodge, No. 279, A. O. U. W., and of East Bloomfield Grange, No. 94. For sixteen years he has been director for the Ontario County Fire Insurance Company. He and his family are birthright Quakers. The children of Mr. White are: Edwin E., William H., Charles R., and Kate E. (deceased.) Edwin E. graduated from the University of Michigan with the degree of M. A., and received a diploma to practice in the Supreme Court of Michigan. He married Mary A. Morey of Lima, and they reside in St. Johns, Mich., where Mr. White has a very extensive real estate and loan business. William H. graduated from the Medical and Pharmaceutical department of Michigan University, and married Jessie D. Pampell. They have one daughter, Marion, and reside in Grand Rapids. Charles R. married Laura E., daughter of William Green of East Bloomfield, and they have two children: Oliver W. and Edwin E. Charles R. was educated in East Bloomfield Academy and in Michigan University. He has been president of the County Alliance for two years. He is a member of Mount Pleasant Lodge, No. 217, I. O. O. F. For two years he has been engaged in the sale of agricultural implements. All of the sons are members of the Sigma Phi.



From Phelps Citizen 27 March 1890

Wells and Bela Whitmore came from Conway and settled to the southwest of Oaks Corners. They were enterprising farmers. Wells married Nancy, a daughter of Seth Deane, and had two sons and a daughter, Moses, Barnard and Charlotte who married William D. Norton. Barnard married Dolly Edmondston. After engaging in farming business, and keeping a hotel, he removed to Marietta, Ga., where he died in 1876, aged 78 years, leaving children. Wells and his widow, Nancy, died in 1858, aged 81 years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Ami Whitney, Seneca, was born in Seneca, June 22, 1814, on the old homestead. He was educated in the common schools, by a private tutor in the family, and at Lima Seminary, and has always followed farming. Mr. Whitney has served as assessor of the town four years, is railroad commissioner for the town of Seneca, and was one of the twelve appointed to divide the old town of Seneca. He was one of the officers to hold the first town meeting in the new town of Seneca. He has married twice, first, September 19, 1843, to Ann Shearman, of the town of Catlin, Chemung county, and had six children: Charlotte E., J. Shearman, Anna (who died at the age of six years), Thomas D., Charles W. and Frank A. Mrs. Whitney died March 23, 1864. For his second wife he married, December 27, 1864, Rebecca C. Rippey, of this town, and they have one son, Eddy R., who was educated in the public schools, Canandaigua Academy, graduated from Clinton Grammar School, also from Hamilton College with the degree of A. B. and afterward with the degree of M. S. He taught one year at Mexico Academy, and is now a professor of science in Binghamton High School. Mr. Ami Whitney's father, Ami, was born in Conway, Hampshire county, Mass., January 18, 1781. He married Anna Amsden, of Hampshire county, born in Connecticut. They had fifteen children: Theodore was killed by a gate falling on him; Jasper was a cripple, caused by a fever; Isaac A. died in 1876; William G. resides in Michigan; a daughter who died in infancy; Charles died at the age of fifteen; Ezra died at the age of four; Ami; Jonathan, who died July 12, 1892; a pair of twin girls who died in infancy; Esther A., who died in 1821; Elizabeth A., Esther G. and Anna H. His grandfather Jonathan, was born August 4, 1737, was a good soldier in the French and Indian wars, was in the siege of Fort Ticonderoga, and came to Geneva in 1789. He stayed four months, then returned for his family and started back in February, 1790, arriving here in March of the same year. They were seventeen days on the way. He died at the Old Castle in 1792. The first known of this family, one John Whitney, aged 35 years, embarked in 1635 from England on ship Elizabeth Ann, and died in 1673. Mrs. Whitney's father, William Rippey, was born November 10, 1793, and married Mary Hayes, October 20, 1821. They had nine children.  There were two ministers in the family, William E. and John Newton.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Cheney P. Whitney, Phelps, was born in Seneca June 10, 1836. His father was Cheeney Whitney, born April 27, 1795 (died at the age of 90). His mother was Olive Colwell of Seneca, and her parents were Daniel and Thankful (Paine) Colwell.  Nathan Whitney, the grandfather, came to this State from Conway, Mass., in 1792. Cheney P. married, November 26, 1861, Mary C., daughter of John F. and Margaret (Lever) Chapman of East Hampton, Mass., and New Jersey. The grandfather was Daniel Chapman, the family dating back to the Chapmans of Saybrook, Conn. They have four children: Margaret Olive (Mrs. Wm. F. Chapman of Boston); Almon C., Minnie M., and John Cheeney. Mr. Whitney came to Phelps in 1873. His farm of 136 acres is used for fruit.  He having about twenty-five acres of vineyard, twenty-five of apple orchard, and five acres of berries; it being one of the noted fruit farms of this section.



From Geneva Gazette 5 March 1886

Seneca Castle - The correspondent of the Canandaigua Messenger gives a very interesting biography of the lateCheney Whitney; and as he was a man well known to almost every inhabitant of this vicinity, we have taken the liberty to publish it in the Gazette .  He says:

The grandfather of Cheney Whitney came from Massachusetts and purchased a large tract of land west of Geneva, near the Indian burying ground.  He had five sons and four daughters, viz:  Joel, Ami, Parkhurst, Jonas, Nathan; Mrs. Selah Hart, Mrs. Howes, Mrs. Gleason and Sybil, all of whom are dead except Mrs. Gleason, who is still with us, aged 86 years.  Joel died on his farm east of Seneca Castle, leaving a large family of sons and daughters, most of whom are still living.  Ami, for many years a helpless cripple, died on his farm west of Flint Creek.  Parkhurst once owned a hotel at Niagara Falls.  Jonas died at or near Clifton Springs and left numerous descendants, many of whom are still living in that region.  Mrs. Hart died some years since in this vicinity, leaving several children, most of whom are living.  She too has numerous descendants. The father of Cheney Whitney was a brother of the Joel Whitney, whose family we have just described.  He was born in Milford, Mass. in 1758; he had nine children, five of whom were born in Conway, Mass.  In 1792 they emigrated to this town and located on the spot where his grandson, Sydney, now lives.  The names of the nine children were Luther, Theodore, Otis, Polly, Nathan, Jonathan, Cheney, Olive and Julia.  Of these nine all are dead except Nathan, who lives in Illinois, and who recently celebrated his eighty-sixth birthday.  Luther died in 1878, aged 95 years; Jonathan in 1875, aged 81 years; Otis in 1885, aged 90 years, and Cheney who died last week, aged 91 years.  Theodore was killed in early life by the fall of a tree, and was the first person buried in the Seneca Castle Cemetery.

Cheney Whitney was born in 1795 in this town; was married to Olive Colwell in 1817.  To them were born nine children.  Their names are Daniel Hopkins, Anna A., Halhalliah, Sydney, Clarisse, Sophronia, Byron, Elvira Emogene, and Cheney Parkhurst.  Of these six are living all the sons and Sophronia, who married William M. Gregory and lives in Southern California.  The five sons all live in this vicinity, and mostly on portions of the original homestead. Cheney Whitney with his wife united with the Presbyterian Church here in 1831.  Since that time his life has been devoted to the cause of Christ.  His whole career was intensely religious.  For the last few years he was so deaf as to be almost shut out from human intercourse.  He was for some absolutely blind, yet he was emphatically the happiest man in this community.  Before losing his eye-sight he was a great reader, keeping well read up with all the discoveries, improvements and inventions of the times.  Did time and space permit, I could dilate much more upon the peculiarities of Mr. Whitney.  His pastor thus summed up his peculiarities in his funeral discourse:  "He was a Christian, humble, simple, faithful, guileless, child-like."



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Frederic D. Whitwell, son of William and Caroline A. (Davenport) Whitwell, was born in Geneva Sept. 2, 1876. He graduated from both the Geneva High School and Hobart College. He was admitted to the Bar Nov. 17, 1903, and has practiced law here almost continuously since. For a number of years he served with distinction as a member of the Geneva Board of Education.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

John Whitwell came from Cheshire, England, in 1829, and was engaged for many years buying and shipping grain. At that time the canals had been opened and there was a through water-way to the sea, which gave much stimulus to business in those days. Mr. Whitwell was also active in political affairs. In early times he was an ardent Whig, and when the Republican party was organized in 1854, he promptly espoused its cause and devoted much time and effort for the success of the party. In 1864 he was elected Sheriff of Ontario County and served three years. His son, William Whitwell, (died Jan. 14, 1914) was for a long time president of the J. W. Smith Dry Goods Co. He was the grandfather of Francis W. and Frederic D. Whitwell. He died Feb. 11, 1883.



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