"T" Surname Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Capt. Robert Taft, West Bloomfield, the largest landholder of West Bloomfield, was a native of Uxbridge, Mass., and bought of Phelps & Gorham seventeen lots, fourteen of which were one mile square, and three over one mile by half a mile. The deed signed in Boston bore date of February 20, 1790, the consideration being $654, and in that year Mr. Taft settled on his land and built his home, where his grandson, William P., now lives. During succeeding years Captain Taft acquired several other lots from Oliver Phelps and others, and some of "Frederick Taft, Gentlemen, of Uxbridge," by whom the lands were surveyed, though it was not often that he resided here. Robert Taft first built a log house, and in 1801 built the brick portion of the house now occupied by William P., the stone portion being added by his son Chapin, about 1836. The children of Capt. Robert Taft were as follows: Josiah, Jesse, Robert second, Bezaleel, Chapin, Maria, Lydia, Nabby, Hannah. Maria married Abner Peck before 1815, their daughters being Louisa, Caroline, and Mary Jane. Hannah married William Pitts of Honeoye.  Myron L. of this town is a grandson of Josiah, and Elvira L. of Elmira a granddaughter. Lewis H. Taft and Royal of Le Roy are sons of Robert second, and Mrs. Myron Shepard and Mrs. Chloe Thomas are daughters. Mrs. Charles R. Case of Allen's Hill (Chloe Joan) is a daughter of Bezaleel, and a son, Robert 3d, is in San Jose, Cal. William P. and Caleb of this town are sons of Chapin. Royal Wheelock is a grandson of Lydia, who married Royal Wheelock, and the venerable Nancy Peck of this village, now 97 years of age, is the daughter of Lydia and Royal Wheelock. Robert T. Leach of this village is a son of Nabby, who married Clement Leach.  Henry Shelton, of New York city, and Frederick Shelton, of Silver City, N. M., are grandsons of Jesse.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Hinckley Tay, Farmington, was born in the town of Concord, N. H., October 10, 1822, and came to this State with his parents when he was two years old. He was educated in the common schools, and came to Farmington in 1839, and has always followed farming. He has just been re-elected poor-master the twenty-third term. He has married twice: first, in 1850, Mary Lapham, and had one daughter, Mary, who married John Burns.  Mrs. Tay died in 1864, and he married second, March 10, 1872, Sarah E., daughter of Cornelius and Mercy Johnson of this town.  They had two children: Harriet E. and Walter H., both residing at home. Mr. Tay's father was born in New Hampshire, and married Sarah Kelly, and had six children: Howard, Rufus, Albert, Francis, Harriet, and Hinckley. His mother died in 1844.  Mrs. Tay's father, Cornelius Johnson, was born in this town in 1814, and was a farmer.  n 1845 he married Mercy Deits, and had five children: Sarah E., John W., George A., Ella E., and Carrie. Mrs. Tay's grandfather, Daniel Deits, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Tay's grandfather, Ebenezer Kelly, was also a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The ancestry of the family is English, German, and Irish.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Taylor, Geneva, was born in Norfolk, England, March 3, 1830. He came to the United States with his parents when five years old, locating in Geneva; was educated in the public schools and learned the bakery and confectionery business. He was in the employ of Hiram L. Suydam  for 18 years, and began business for himself in 1867, which has been continued with success. March 3, 1852, he married Mary P. Evered, of Honeoye Falls. She was born in Suffolk, England, and came to the United States in 1850. They have had four children: William E.; Franklin P., who died in infancy; Charles E. (died August 19, 1882); and Ida B. Charles E. married Laura J. Jones, of Clyde, and they have two daughters: Daisy I., and Edna M. Ida M. married Philip R. Kirk, formerly of Bridgeport, Conn., and they have one daughter, Edith M. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Old Castle Lodge No. 299 I. O. O. F., and has held all the offices of that organization.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry R. Taylor, Clifton Springs, was born in Benton, Yates county, January 23, 1830. His father was William, son of James, a native of County Down, Ireland, who came to America in 1755, at the age of 19 years. He resided in New Windsor, Orange county. In 1776 he enlisted in the army of the Revolution. He was in New York when it was taken by the British. After his enlistment expired he was often engaged as a militiaman for occasional service.  He was engaged in the battle of White Plains, and shared in much of the irregular but trying service along the Hudson River. His wife was Elizabeth Thompson of Plattskill, N. Y., whom he married in 1781. William Taylor was born in 1793, in Orange county, NY, moved with his father's family to Ontario county in 1818, lived for a short time in the town of Seneca, then moved to the town of Benton; married Margaret Coleman in 1821, when they settled in Southwest Benton on a farm where he lived until his death, in 1879.  He received a commission as lieutenant in the Forty second Regiment of Infantry from Governor Yates in 1824, and a captain's commission in the One Hundred Third Regiment from Governor Enos Throop in 1830.  Was elected to the office of supervisor for a number of terms and also filled the office of superintendent of the poor for several years. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor had born to them six sons and one daughter, all of whom are still living except one son who died in infancy. Henry R. Taylor, the fourth child, was married October 16, 1860, to Adelia C. Barnes, daughter of James G. Barnes of the town of Seneca. They lived in Benton, one and one-half miles west of Penn Yan, till November, 1871, when they moved to the town of Hopewell, Ontario county, having bought the farm once owned by the late Jesse Cost near the north line of the town. He now owns 143 acres and carries on general farming.  Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have had born to them seven children: William, Sarah Eliza (deceased), Harry S., Margaretta A., Ralph B. (deceased), John Worth, and Mary C. R.  Harry S. graduated at the Albany Normal College in the class of 1890, and Margaretta A. from the Auburn High School in the class of 1890; both are engaged in teaching. Mr. Taylor was originally a Seward Whig, hence when the Republican party was formed he naturally found his place in that organization and has not missed voting at every general election since he became a voter in 1851. He was elected to the office of justice of the peace in Benton in 1866, and re-elected in 1870; he also held the office of assessor for one term. He is a member of the Hopewell Grange No. 79.  He and his family are all members of the Presbyterian church of Shortsville, of which he has been one of the elders for the past fifteen years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John B. Taylor, Geneva, was born in the town of Seneca, now Geneva, October 5, 1823.  He was educated in the public schools and followed farming.  January 3, 1853, he married Lucinda W. Smith of Waitsfield, Vt., and they had two daughters, Ruth E., a school teacher who resides at home, and Jane E., who died aged four years.  Mr. Taylor's father, Horace B., was born April 28, 1799, on the lake road in the town.  He married Jane Barnes, born February 20, 1803, and they had eight children:  John B., Horace and Jane E. (twins), Elizabeth A., George W., Mary E., Charles W. and Mark S.; four survive.  Mrs. Taylor's father, Ithamar Smith, was born in Shelburne, Mass., June 6, 1787.  October 26, 1817, he married Ruth Barnard of his native place, and they had seven children:  Chauncey, Selah, who died in infancy, Selah second, Luther L., Lucinda W., Abigail H., and Francis B.  Mrs. Taylor's grandfather, Selah Smith, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  Mr. Taylor's grandfather, John, was one of the early pioneers of this country, coming here at the age of twelve years and passing through Rochester when there were only two log houses there.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Leroy Allen Taylor was born at Albany, N. Y., on March 14, 1898. He attended Albany Public School No. 6, graduating in 1914. He entered the stove manufacturing business in Albany and remained there until 1918 when he joined the U. S. Marine Corps, 108th Company. He was honorably discharged in 1919 and returned to Albany. He was later transferred to Aurora, Ill., as field manager for the concern by which he was employed. Mr. Taylor came to Geneva in February, 1921, as sales manager of the Summit Foundry Company. On June 1, 1928, he was named secretary of the Geneva Chamber of Commerce succeeding Vincent S. Welch, resigned. Mr. Taylor has been active in American Legion circles and is a past commander of Winnek Post, 396. He is a member of Geneva Lodge of Masons, the Hydrant Hose Company, former secretary of the Geneva Rotary Club and is now an officer of the Rod & Gun Club, the Geneva Auto Club, Geneva Merchants' Trading Association and the Geneva Community Concert Association. On December 23, 1921, he was married to Violet R. Watson of Albany. They have one child, Babette Ruth.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Loren A. Taylor, West Bloomfield, was born in Honeoye Falls in 1839. His father, Chester W., came to West Bloomfield in 1830, and married Emily Sawdy, of Marathon, Cortland county, and had four children: Loren A.; Clinton E., a farmer of this town and a soldier in the War of the Rebellion, who was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry; Alfred L., of Fairport; and one who died in infancy. Mary Jane Taylor, an adopted daughter, now lives with Loren A. Chester W. Taylor died in October, 1890. Loren A. was educated in the common schools and at East Bloomfield Academy, also at Lima Seminary, and has been engaged in farm produce business for many years. He has been justice of the peace for four years. He was a private in the One Hundred and Forty-eighth N. Y. Vols. in the late war and was discharged for disability. He married in 1864, Mary E. Parmelee, of East Bloomfield.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Taylor, Geneva, was born in Norfolk county, England. He married Mary Becket, and they came to America in 1836, settling in Geneva. He was a wagonmaker by trade and they had six children.  He died in July, 1888, and his wife in 1836. George, son of William, was six years of age when his parents came to Geneva. At the age of fifteen years he went to learn the baker's trade, and in 1867 established a bakery at Geneva, which he has carried on ever since. He married Mary Everett, and has one child, Ida B., wife of P. R. Kirk, who resides in Geneva.  The family are members of the M. E. church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thomas Teece, Gorham, a native of Shropshire, England, was born July 18, 1847, one of nine children of James and Jane Teece of that place. His father was a farmer, and died in January, 1851. His mother is still living near Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. At twelve years old, Thomas was apprenticed to the dry goods trade for four years, afterwards living on the farm. In the spring of 1870 he came to America, being twenty-two years old, and lived near Gorham and Hall's Corners for five years.  In 1875 he married Eleanor, daughter of James and Mary Watkins, of Steuben county. Mr. and Mrs. Watkins came to this country from Monmouthshire, England, in 1845, and lived in Steuben county. Mr. Watkins died in May, 1891, and his wife is July 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Teece have had seven children, all of whom are living: Mary J., James H., Mertie, Minnie, Nellie, Sarah B. and Maud E. In 1875 Mr. Teece went to Steuben county where he purchased a farm of fifty-twp acres, and farmed it eleven years there. In 1886 he came back to Ontario county and worked a farm on shares near Hall's Corners. In 1890 he purchased a farm of 115 acres near Gorham village, where he now lives. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of Stanley Grange No. 284. Mrs. Teece is a Baptist, but the family attend and support the Presbyterian church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

J. S. Tellier, Naples, editor of the Naples Record.  This gentleman is a self-made man, having started out in life for himself at the age of fifteen years, and has made his own way in the world. He has been for the past six years editor and proprietor of the Record, well known throughout the country as a live and enterprising independent newspaper.



From Naples Record 5 June 1875

The descendants of a numerous family, now widely scattered over various parts of the West, should look back in the glimmering visions of the past, to when their ancestors were to exchange their comfortable homes and dear associations in Massachusetts, to become pioneers and experience the hardships and privations of this part of the "New Genesee Country." Oliver Tenney, the subject of this reminiscence, married Bathsheba Watkins of Patridgefield, Mass., and was engaged there in the mercantile business. He, with others, was awakened with the spirit of enterprise to go and help settle up those fertile regions of western New York, and while the fever of emigration ran through Berkshire, preparations were made accordingly for his large family to leave the dear old home of kindred and friends. The family was engaged for many weeks in preparation -- in the manufacture of clothing, and gathering the necessaries for the journey, and the beginning in the wilderness; herbs and medicines were carefully laid up, every little item of utility was carefully packed. During the time of getting ready, the minister and the neighbors would come in to sympathize or encourage the dear ones that were soon to depart. The day was set in Sept. 1802 for the start; friends and neighbors had been gathered all the forenoon, and lingered in mournful tears, and sobbing away the precious moments until 2 o'clock p.m., when the team of their home was hitched to the heavy, loaded wagon, and the mother of the Tenney family with her children, Rhoda Harding, Judith Hawes and James Kibbe, the driver, making eleven in all, were seated; the last shaking of hands was had, and the last farewell was said; the group stood back and that wagon of precious emigrants moved off in silence save the deep sighs that grief had manifested. Soon the home views of childhood faded away in the distance and the blue hills of Massachusetts disappeared forever from their sight. The father remained to settle up the unfinished business that he had engaged in, and the three hundred miles of poor roads and sparsely settled country were to be passed during and after the equinoctial storm. It is now over half a century since my mother, Judith Hawes, talked to me of her suffering and homesickness in that long and tedious journey of four weeks coming from "down country" to this. She was then 14 years of age. Could we now be permitted to see a diary kept at that time of all the incidents, of the fatigue and sickness and discouragements, and the full account of all the perils of fording streams, oversettings, and passing through the long stretch of wilderness, with here and there a little log house -- what a contrast would it show with the cities and villages that line four iron tracks of thoroughfare, over which thousands of precious lives in palace cars, and millions of commercial wealth, pass every few hours -- over the pioneers track of seventy-five years ago. For three weeks this stout team had traveled with its heavy load until they with the passengers had tired out at Onondaga and halted a week for rest. The driver came on to Middletown and procured a fresh team. Arriving at Montezuma marshes, the girls got out and walked a long way on logs, and the mother carried two children, the youngest, in her arms, and for nearly half a day the team wallowed through the mire. Said the driver when he had passed through, "I found one spot that had no bottom." After four weeks of weary travel, they arrived safe in Middletown, late in October 1802, where the wolves would gather around the house nights, and lap out of the swill pail, and chase the dog into the house; shots were fired at them but with no effect.

Mr. Oliver Tenney purchased of Thomas R. Gould, settling lots No. 48 and 49, for $5 an acre, and erected a log house on the flat near the creek -- an apple tree now marks the spot near where George Kimber resides. Mr. Tenney was an eccentric, industrious man, well-informed, and a great wit and story teller; he was a good mechanic, and was useful in the community. Mr. Tenney was called a witness to testify to the mill gearing and workmanship of the millwright; the counsel, among other questions, asked him his age; his answer was 60 years; the counsel then asked him how long he had been a millwright, his answer was 60 years; "Why," said the counsel, "how can that be?" "Who made you a millwright?" He answered, the Almighty made me a millwright, and I am doing his will. Mr. Tenney would always beat any story teller. On one occasion his neighbor bragged that he had a hickory tree that had more walnuts than any one of Mr. Tenney's trees. "How many walnuts did your tree have on?" "Six hundred and fifty bushels," said his neighbor. "Humph," said Tenney, "mine had just eight hundred and fifty bushel." "I am beaten," said his neighbor.

Mr. Tenney raised a family of eight children; they were all industrious and did their work well. He died in Naples in 1829 at the age of 66 years. His children were as follows: William Tenney, the oldest son, came to Middletown in 1800, and settled near where E. A. Hamlin now lives; he married Rosannah Wilson; he died in 1807. Thomas Tenney purchased what was once the Sherman farm for $5 an acre; he married Mehetable McVail; he died in Hillsdale, Mich., at the age of 73 years. Ruth Tenney married Samuel Metcalf; she died in 1807 at the age of 23 years. Lydia Tenney married Chester Reed, in 1813; she died in Naples in 1862. Olive Tenney married Ichabod Green; she came in the wagon at the age of 12 years; she died in Martin, Mich., in 1874, at the age of 82 years. Sarah Tenney was born in 1793, married Timothy Crittenden in Naples and lives in Gunn Plains, Mich. Oliver Tenney was born in Massachusetts in 1796, married Ellen McMichen, and lives in Lockport, N. Y Alva Tenney settled near S. G. Marsh's in Naples; married Marcia Clark, and died July 10th, 1840. Roxana Tenney was born in Mass. and came to Middletown when a babe; married I. M. Lyon, in 1824, and died on the place her father once owned in April, 1873, aged 72 years. Amasa Tenney was born in Naples in 1803; married Mariah Maxfield; lived in Paw Paw, Van Buren Co., Mich. Marinda Tenney was born in Naples in 1806; married Sylvester Warren in 1830, and now lives with her son, Amasa T. Warren, on the old homestead.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;
 
George I. Teter was born in Jacksonville, Tompkins County, N. Y., on September 2, 1872, the son of John M. and Louise K. Teter. He was graduated from Ithaca High School and Cornell University with the class of 1898 with the degree of LL.B. Shortly afterwards Mr. Teter began the practice of law, his life profession. He entered public life in this city in 1908 when he was elected an alderman from the Second Ward, serving until 1910. In 1922 he was appointed city attorney by Mayor Jasper B. Stahl and acted in that capacity during 1922-23. In 1928 he was again named city attorney by Mayor Henry T. Maxwell and was renamed by Mayor Melvin S. Gaylord. He is a member of Ark Lodge, F. and A. M., and has been a trustee  of the Methodist Episcopal church. During the war he served as a member of the "Four Minute Men." In 1905 Mr. Teter married Bertha Scofield of Waterloo. She died in 1918 and in 1922 Mr. Teter married Florence A. Reynolds. One daughter, Luisa, a public school teacher at Ripley, N. Y., was born of the first marriage.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Alonzo Thatcher, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, Ontario county, July 1816, is a son of Israel Thatcher, of Massachusetts, who came to Hopewell in 1808, and here spent the remainder of his days. His wife was Delight Litchfield, by whom he had five sons and five daughters. He died in February, 1866, and his wife in 1856. Alonzo Thatcher was reared on a farm, and married in 1840 Hannah E. Purdy, a native of Yates county, born in 1822. Her parents were Francis and Annie (Griffith) Purdy, who had one son and four daughters. Mr. Purdy was an early settler of Canandaigua. Mr. Thatcher and wife have had three sons and two daughters, two of whom are living: Lester, and Annie J., wife of Asa F. Miles, a son of Amasa, who was a son of Thomas Miles, born in Massachusetts, who settled in Hopewell in 1802, and died September 12, 1842. Amasa Miles was born in Hopewell in 1812.  His wife was Fidelia Root, by whom he had twelve children. He died in July, 1888, and his wife died in May of that year.  Mr. Miles and wife have one child, Mary J. He is a member of Canandaigua Grange No. 138; of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294 F. & A. M., and Excelsior Chapter No. 166 R. A. M. He has been Master of Ceremony in the Blue Lodge, and Master of Third Vail in the Chapter. Alonzo Thatcher is a Republican, and a member of Canandaigua Grange No. 158. In 1845 he moved to Hillsdale county, Mich., and there lived nineteen years, then returning to Hopewell, where he has since resided.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lester Thatcher, Hopewell, was born in Canandaigua, October 14, 1842, a son of Alonzo Thatcher, who removed to Hillsdale county, Mich., where Lester was educated. In 1864 he returned to Hopewell, and in 1865 married Lorada Freshour, born in Hopewell in 1840, a daughter of William, son of John Freshour. Her father was born in Hopewell in 1813, and married Mahetable Penn, a distant relative of William Penn. Mr. Freshour and wife had three daughters: Mary (deceased) wife of Augustus T. Smith; Hester A., wife of Edward Wright, of Canandaigua; and Lorada. Mr. Freshour was one of the leading farmers of Hopewell, and was assessor several years. He died in 1891 and his wife in 1856. Lester Thatcher and wife have had three children: Hettie E., wife of Charles H. Rockfeller, a farmer of Gorham, Angie L. (deceased); and Sylvia E., at home.  Mr. Thatcher is a Republican in politics, and has been highway commissioner three years. He is a member of Hopewell Grange No. 454.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

C. C. Thayer, Clifton Springs, was born in Dana, Mass., January 11, 1840. He prepared for Amherst College at Monson Academy, Mass., in 1861, just at the breaking out of the Civil War, but instead of entering college he enlisted in the Tenth Massachusetts Militia (three months' service), after which he returned to West Warren, Mass., where he conducted a mission work, out of which he returned to West Warren, Mass., where he conducted a mission work, out of which there afterwards grew a self-supporting church. By the advice of some of the directors and professors of Amherst College, he entered the Chicago Theological Seminary, Chicago, Ill. After one year, and under a special order of  General Grant, he entered the army of the Southwest for hospital service, and remained three and one-half years, when he re-entered the Chicago Theological Seminary and graduated in the regular course in 1867. The same year he married  Miss Mary F. Spencer, of Ripon College, Wis., and the following spring went under appointment of the "American Board" to the "Central Turkey Mission," Asia, and was stationed at old Antioch.  In 1871 he was voted by his mission from Antioch to Aintab for the purpose of starting the Aintab College, and in connection with his associate, Rev. Henry Marden, gathered and trained the first class for the college.  After six months of sickness, he returned to America in June, 1873, and after three and one-half years of ill-health he entered Rush Medical College and graduated in 1878. While pursuing his medical course he was called to take the practice of a former professor in the college, whose health had failed, where he remained for three years, when he was invited to the practice of medicine in the Clifton Springs Sanitarium, where he remained six years, when he resigned and opened a successful practice in Minneapolis, Minn., where he lived four and one-half years, till recalled to the Clifton Springs Sanitarium as the chief physician.  Dr. Thayer  has a daughter in Ripon College, Wis., and a son in Lima Academy, NY, both born in Turkey.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Samuel B. Thomas, Gorham, was born in Jerusalem, Yates county, December 30, 1847. His father, David A., was a son of Judge David Thomas, of Scipio, who married a Miss Allen and had ten children. He was one of the leading men of the county, and was associate judge of Yates county several years. David A. was born in Scipio in 1816. He was a great reader.  His wife was Hannah S. Wyman, and to them were born five sons and four daughters. For many years they resided at Potter Centre.  His death occurred July, 1886. Mrs. Thomas now resides at Rushville. Samuel B. was educated in the common schools, and December 16, 1873, married Cornelia Young, a native of Jerusalem, born September 5, 1848. For twenty-five years he has lived in Gorham, and for nineteen years has resided on the Young homestead. In politics he is a Democrat.  The father of Mrs. Thomas was Abraham Young, son of Jacob Young, who married in Albany county Elizabeth Henry, by whom he had a son and two daughters. Mr. Young came to Gorham about 1812, but later moved to Yates county, and died in 1836. His wife died in 1848. Abraham Young was born in 1799. He married first, April 18, 1821, Almira Robinson, and had four sons and five daughters. November 10, 1837, Mrs. Young died, and September 20, 1839, he married Samantha Porter Reed, by whom he had two sons and two daughters. He died December 28, 1885, and his wife died July 8, 1892.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George T. Thompson, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua January 8, 1854, a son of Thomas, a carpenter of this town.  He was educated in the common schools and the academy under Professors Clarke and Halsey, and his first business venture was in 1870, when he engaged with S. S. Bergher, and in 1876 he went in partnership with him in the manufacture of sash, blinds and doors.  This partnership lasted until the spring of 1885, when he bought out the interest of Mr. Bergher, and has since conducted the business alone. In 1890 he added the handling and dealing in lumber, buying out the yard of E. O. Wader.  In 1890-91 he was one of the village trustees.  He married in 1879 Louise M., daughter of Edward Parrish, of Canandaigua, and their union has been blessed by two sons, Arthur E. and Carl G.  Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are members of St. John's Episcopal church, of which he is a vestryman.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Thompson, Sr., Gorham, was born in Murrayshire, Scotland, April 16, 1818, a son of John and Janette (Milne) Thompson, also natives of Murrayshire, who had eight sons and three daughters. John was a farmer and died in Scotland in 1860, and his wife December 22, 1883, aged ninety years. William Thompson was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. He married Mary, a daughter of John and Mary (Southerland) Frazer, natives of Scotland, who had ten children. The children of Mr. Thompson are: Jessie, wife of Joel Bishop, and has four children; John, married Sophia Hartman and resides in Auburn; William, married Isabelle Robson; Mary, a teacher at Clifton Springs; Jean T., married M. H. Nelson and has two children; and George who works his father's farm. In 1858 Mr. Thompson came to Canada and spent one year. He next spent one year in Wisconsin, and then came east and followed the milling business nine years in East Palmyra, Macedon, and Manchester Centre. In 1868 he purchased the farm he now owns in Gorham. In 1881 he built a fine house and has made many improvements. He is a Republican. Mr. Thompson has three brothers in America and one in Scotland.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Thomson, Jr., Gorham, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, January 14, 1851, son of William and Mary Thomson, mentioned elsewhere in this work. Subject was nine years old when he came to America with his parents.  He received a common school education, and was taught the milling business, which he followed eight years, and then learned the carpenter's trade, at which he has since worked. In 1882 he married Isabelle, daughter of James Robson, and they had two children, James W. and Robert F., who live at home. Mr. Thomson is a Republican, and was assessor three years. He and family are members of the Presbyterian church at Gorham.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Edwin S. Thorne, head of the Geneva Preserving Company, was born in Schoharie County, Dec. 24, 1865. He was educated in the District Schools and at Rensselaerville Academy. He commenced his business career as a farmer, continuing until 1890 when he came to Geneva and entered the employ of the Geneva Preserving Col, with which he has since been connected. In addition to his business, Mr. Thorne has served on several public commissions including the Board of Public Works, Fire Commission and the Police Commission.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The Throop Family, Manchester - Early in the year 1802, Benjamin Throop exchanged his farm in Lebanon, Windham county, Conn., for a tract containing 512 acres in the northeast portion of what is now Manchester. This tract was a portion of the original Phelps & Gorham purchase and had been previously sold by the men so prominently identified with the early history of Ontario county to parties in Connecticut, with whom the exchange was made by Mr. Throop. During the autumn of the same year, Mr. Throop, having completed the necessary arrangements and bidden goodbye to his New England home, set out for his destination in what was then an almost unbroken wilderness. The method of transportation was the most common at that time, and consisted of an ox team with a single house as a "leader", attached to a heavy wagon, and with two or three such teams, Mr. Throop, at the age of forty-eight, with his wife, three sons and four daughters and with such household goods as could be most conveniently transported, set out upon his long, wearisome journey. Many incidents of the journey were of much interest that cannot here be mentioned. Reaching their destination, about the middle of November and finding it then too late to build even a comfortable log cabin, the first winter in the "Genesee country", was spent by the family in a portion of the house of Thomas Rogers, also a settler from New England, who had preceded Mr. Throop by three or four years, and had therefore become quite comfortably located. This hospitality, so common at that early day, was thoroughly appreciated by Mr. Throop, and a warm friendship existed between the families during the lifetime of the older members. In the succeeding spring a log house was erected on the spot now occupied by the residence of J. Allen Throop, and in 1816 the structure now constituting the "upright" of said residence was built. When Mr. Throop first came to this place, it was about the center of a six mile woods, the first house in the direction of Palmyra being that of Thomas Rogers, already mentioned, while the nearest neighbor in the opposite direction was also three miles distant. In that early day, Geneva, sixteen miles distant, contained the government land office and one, at least, of the few banking institutions in the State. As a consequence much travel to and from Geneva took place and as a further consequence even the original log houses became the stopping place of settlers from the more northern towns, while en route to Geneva, and also for numerous travelers, who, having reached this point at or near nightfall, hesitated to again plunge into the depths of the forest, and sought entertainment for both man and beast at the Throop residence. As. Mr. Throop could not turn a deaf ear to these applications, and as the calls became more and more frequent, a "public house" was opened and maintained for thirty years, at first in the log structure and later in the more modern building erected in 1816. The Throop House became also a favorite stopping place for the red man when on his migratory expeditions between the Oneida and Tonawanda reservations. On one occasion a party of eighteen or twenty, including squaws and papooses, rested for the night on the bar room floor. Within the recollection of the writer, these traveling bands of Indians were common, and as the squaw invariably carried the papoose, seated on a piece of tough bark attached to a belt passing over the shoulder and in front of the forehead, while the husband and father carried only his bow and arrows, a vivid and lasting impression was made thereby. For many years these friendly relations between Mr. Throop and his dusky brethren were maintained. Many events in connection with these early times of a romantic and stirring nature came to the knowledge of the writer, and among these the loss of children in the forest and the subsequent search by the entire neighborhood with guns, horns and dogs, was always a source of much interest as related by a revered and honored grandfather. The story of the depredations committed by bears, wolves, foxes, etc., with the methods adopted for their capture, originated from the same source. Benjamin Throop was of Scotch descent, a participant in the stirring events of the Revolutionary War and a relative in a direct line of Governor Enos T. Throop. He was of a kindly genial disposition and died in 1842 in his eighty-eighth year.  His wife, a woman remarkable alike for her great fortitude, decision of character and intimate knowledge of current political history, followed him in 1851, at the age of almost one hundred years. Her memory was remarkable and till past her eightieth year, she could repeat verbatim entire chapters from the Bible. The late Azel Throop inherited what had become the Throop homestead, was a pensioner of the War of 1812 and died in March, 1878, aged eighty-six years.  His wife, Fanny Van Dusen, survived him four years and died at the age of eighty-four years. Among the enterprising and intelligent citizens of New York, Michigan, Ohio and Illinois, are many of the descendants of Benjamin and Rachel Throop, while on the the spot where the grandfather first set foot nearly one hundred years ago, lives J. Allen Throop, eldest son of Azel Throop. The present owner of the "old homestead" is the father of four sons and a daughter, is a progressive farmer, proud of his calling, a staunch Republican, proud of his party and its history, and an intensely loyal American citizen, proud of the country of his birth. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Albert H. Tibbals, Canadice, was born in this town January 28, 1843. Arnold Tibbals, who was born in 1713 in Connecticut, was of English descent, and a son of Captain Tibbals, one of the founders of the Connecticut colony. Arnold was the father of David 1st, father of David 2d, father of Peter, father of Albert H. David 2d came to Canadice in 1818 and settled where his son Noah now lives. His son Peter was born April 22, 1821, in Canadice, and was apprenticed to Chauncey Parsons, a blacksmith in Geneseo, and in that town gained part of his education. He married while there Jane Bennett, a native of England, who came with her father George and his six brothers to this country when ten years old. Peter lived in various places and came to Canadice and settled where Albert H. now lives in 1858, and here he was engaged in farming and blacksmithing until his death, July 17, 1878. Of his four children, one died young, and the others are: Albert H.; Addie L., born in 1857, wife of Rev. A. W. Fenton, a Methodist minister; and Netta, born in 1860, wife of Stephen J. Cole, a farmer of Richmond. He held several of the town offices. Albert H. was educated at the district schools and Dansville Seminary, and worked on his father's farm, teaching school winters for three years. He then enlisted in Company K, One Hundred Forty-seventh New York Infantry, under Colonel F. C. Miller, in July, 1863. He was in several engagements, including all the battles of the Wilderness Campaign to the battle and charge of Petersburg, June 18, 1864. Of more than six hundred men of this regiment who went into the Wilderness on the 4th of May, less than one hundred were left and fit for duty after this battle of Petersburg.  Mr. Tibbals was slightly wounded twice in these battles, but not disabled nor excused from duty till the latter part of June, when he went into hospital on account of sickness. Later he returned to his regiment and participated in the battles of Hatcher's Run, Gravelly Run, Five Forks, and at General Lee's surrender at Appomattox C. H. He was adjutant's clerk at headquarters much of the time when not in active movement, and was discharged in July, 1865. Returning home he taught school fourteen winters and engaged in farming. In 1866 he married Lucy E., daughter of Henry Slingerland of this town.  They have two sons: Grant A., born November 4, 1867, for some time a teacher, and now clerk of the Surrogate's Court of this county; and Walter H., born July 11, 1881. Mr. Tibbals is now serving his fifth term as justice of the peace; he was a notary public several years, a member of the Board of Supervisors in 1884-5, and justice of sessions in 1890-1-2.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

David Tibbals, Canadice, was born in Hartford county, Conn., October 8, 1785. When eight years old his father moved to Galway, Saratoga county, N. Y. There David lived until manhood. He learned the carpenter and joiner's trade, married, and moved to Cayuga county, N. Y., there followed his profession for ten years. In 1816 he bought a farm in Canadice and in 1818 moved on to it and there lived until his death, which occurred September 27, 1868. Mr. Tibbals was the husband of three wives, and the father of seven children. His first wife was the mother of one (Phebe), and died September 17, 1809, in Saratoga county. His second wife was the mother of six children (Sarah, Wakeman, Charlotte, Peter, Noah and Luther). On April 9, 1832, this wife and mother died a most pitiable death, caused by falling on to a new made fire in an old fashioned log house fire-place. Mr. Tibbals rose early on Sunday morning, built the fire as usual, and went to the barn to do some chores, expecting to return before any of the family were up. When he came in he found Mrs. Tibbals sitting on the floor with her flannel clothing all burned off one side of her, with the fragments of clothing and adhering coals scattered over the floor. She lingered four days and expired. Mrs. Tibbals was an unfortunate woman from her youth, being troubled with epilepsy, which caused her premature death. Mr. Tibbals's third consort died April 3, 1864. Of the children of Mr. Tibbals, four are dead:  Phebe, Sarah, Peter and Wakeman. Charlotte, it is unknown. Noah and Luther live in Canadice. Noah is on the homestead where he was born.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Isaac M. Tichenor, Canandaigua, was born at Newark, N. J., February 23, 1789. a son of Moses Tichenor, of New Jersey. Isaac M. was one of two children. His sister, Mary, married a Mr. Sexton, who moved to Jamaica in the West Indies, and was never heard of afterward. The early life of our subject was spent in the town of his birth. He was of French descent and was educated by a French tutor. After a few years spent on a farm he went into the shoe business in Newark, N. J., which he followed until about 1837, when, on account of ill health, he was ordered by his physician to find a quiet home in the country. He was an ardent student of nature, and after inspecting the country all about, permanently located on the west shore of Canandaigua Lake, where he bought the farm now occupied by F. O. Chamberlain. He was there about twelve years, and then bought the farm where the rest of his life was spent. Tichenor's Point on the lake was named for him. He died August 17, 1863, and the church of which he was a member lost one of its firmest supporters. He was a strong Republican. He was also a soldier of the War of 1812, and at his death, was one of the last survivors of this war. He married, when but seventeen years of age, Jemima Baldwin, of Newark, and they had eight children, three still living: Henrietta D., wife of S. C. White, of Augusta, Ga.; Harriet P., wife of Rev. A. M. Stowe of Canandaigua; and Almira Tichenor, who conducts the old homestead farm, a beautiful place of 175 acres, which has become a very popular summer resort. Immediately in front of the old homestead is a camp of the Natural Science Club.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Francis J. Tiffany, Hopewell, was born in Canandaigua, April 30, 1823, a son of Edmund Tiffany, a native of Massachusetts, who when six years of age came with his parents, Zachariah and Susan Tiffany, to Canandaigua. Here the grandparents lived and died. Edmund Tiffany married Polly Jones, and they had one son and three daughters. He died in 1868, and his wife died in 1865. Francis J. was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy. He married Martha Faurot, a native of Hopewell, and they had one daughter, Mary E., who became Mrs. Henry A. Darling. She died in 1883, leaving two children: Grace and Henry T. Grace died in 1883. Since 1880 Mr. Tiffany has resided on a part of what is known as the Bush estate. He is a Republican, and has been inspector fifteen years. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian Church of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Christopher Tilden, Manchester, was born in Charlestown, N. H., April 26, 1827.  His father moved to Palmyra early in this century and carried on the stove and tin business for a number of years.  In 1844 he moved on the homestead farm of 125 acres in Manchester, which he purchased and of which the subject of this brief sketch inherited a part upon the death of his father. Christopher Tilden lived upon that farm and toiled for many years.  There he was married to Marcelline Holmes of Manchester, a descendant of one of Ontario's pioneer families.  Finding more land desirable and available, Mr. Tilden purchased another farm of 100 acres near Palmyra, upon which he still lives.  Mr. Tilden has filled many local and town offices and was a director of the plank road for many years.  He enjoys the respect and esteem of all.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

William Tippets was a prominent merchant in Geneva; he was one of the incorporators of the Geneva Academy, was once postmaster, owned considerable real estate, was proprietor of the land where T. C. Maxwell & Bros. nursery on Castle street was later located and built the Eagle Tavern on the southwest corner of Castle and Exchange streets where the Kirkwood Hotel now is, which latter building was erected after the destruction by fire of the building that preceded it.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Oliver S. Titus, Shortsville, was born at Phelps, May 13, 1843. He received a liberal education, and when nineteen years of age he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred Forty-eighth N. Y. Vols., under Captain Dexter E. Clapp. This was on August 22, 1862. He was principally employed upon detached service at department headquarters at Fortress Monroe, and was mustered out June 5, 1865. After the war Mr. Titus married Francis M. Upham, of Sherburne, Chenango county. He resided in Phelps and also in Kirksville, Mo., for a few years. Upon Christmas day, 1874, Mr. Titus occupied a position with the Empire Drill Company of Shortsville, with which company he has since been identified, and now holds the office of secretary and treasurer. Mr. Titus is identified with local social, church and benevolent institutions here, such as Royal Templars of Temperance, etc., etc.  He has a family of three children, one son and two daughters.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Frederick B. Tobey, East Bloomfield, was born in East Bloomfield, April 24, 18--, son of Lorenzo Brooks, whose father, Micah Brooks, was a native of Connecticut. The mother of Frederick B. Tobey was Emeline, daughter of Benjamin Tobey.  She died when subject was quite young, and he was adopted by Frederick N. Tobey, a brother of his mother, who had no children. Frederick N. Tobey was born in Massachusetts in 1806, and came to East Bloomfield when ten years of age. He married Mariana Steele, sister of Hiram Steele. Mr. Tobey was a farmer and lived and died on the farm settled by his father.  He served as justice of the peace and constable. Frederick B. Tobey was reared on the farm he now owns, educated in East Bloomfield Academy and the Collegiate Institute of Rochester. June 23, 1873, he married Sarah Hopkins, a native of Illinois, and a daughter of Henry Hopkins, of Salem, NY, whose wife was Evelyn Hamlin, a native of Elyria, O. Mr. Hopkins and wife had two sons and four daughters. He died in 1890 and his wife in 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Tobey have had three children: Frederick H., Arthur R. and Charles H. Mr. Tobey owns 300 acres in East Bloomfield, and has always been a Democrat. He has been assessor for three years, and is a member of Milnor Lodge No. 139 F. & A. M., and also of the Farmers' Alliance at East Bloomfield. He and family are members of the Episcopal church, of which his adopted father was one of the founders.  Mr. Tobey has been a vestryman ever since the church was organized.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Vinson E. Tomkins, Geneva, the owner and proprietor of the well known Tompkins House in Geneva, was the son of Ira G. Tompkins, a native of Dutchess county, and a landlord of good reputation in Ontario county and vicinity, he having kept public house in Naples, and also at Spencer's Corners before coming to Geneva. In 1825 Ira G. Tompkins came to Geneva and was foreman in H. L. Lumb's shoe shop, but in 1844 he became proprietor of the old Geneva House, which he kept for nearly four years. The latter is prominently located near the depots, and has always been made the headquarters for the New York Central and Lehigh Valley officials, and among the many railway magnates who have enjoyed the hospitality of this house we may recall the name of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. Ira G. Tompkins opened this house in 1848 and maintained it until about the time of his death December 29, 1888, being succeeded in the proprietorship by his son, Vinson E. Tompkins, who is now its owner; and we may say without exaggeration that the son is the worthy successor of his father, for the excellence of cuisine at the Tompkins House is well known throughout Central New York.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry H. Torrey, Naples, son of Larned Torrey, was born in Middlesex, Yates county, January 7, 1820. He was educated at the common schools of that town, and moved to Marion, Wayne county, in 1868, remaining about six years. In 1877 he moved to Naples and married Delia Metcalf, who died January 4, 1890, and in July of that year he married Mary J. Brayton, daughter of Israel Blood, of Rushville. Mr. Torrey has been an active business man and has taken much interest in politics. He was highway commissioner one year, constable one year in Middlesex, etc.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Levi W. Totman, Bristol, was born in Bristol, April 7, 1842.  His father was Ward Totman, a son of Thomas Totman, who was born August 22, 1763. Ward Totman was born in Warren county, August 12, 1804. When a young man he and his mother removed to Jefferson county, where he married Irene Joiner, of Sullivan, Madison county, a daughter of Benjamin Joiner. She bore him four sons and three daughters. They came to Bristol in 1840, and settled on the farm now owned by the subject.  Mrs. Totman died in July, 1863, and Mr. Totman married Hannah M. Moore, of Watertown. She died in 1887. He and wife were members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Totman died March 23, 1892. Subject of sketch was educated in East Bloomfield Academy. In 1862 he enlisted in Company K, First N. Y. Mounted Rifles, and served until June, 1865. He was in the following battles: Williamsburg, Suffolk, Deserted House, Weldon Road, and other engagements. He owns 200 acres of land. He has been twice married, first to Zylpha M. Moore, of East Watertown, Jefferson county, by whom he had the following children: Inez M. (deceased), Morris H. (deceased), Ella M., Florence L., Grace A., and Joel W. Mrs. Totman died February 6, 1883, and November 7 of the same year Mr. Totman married Miss Julia Woodworth, of East Watertown, Jefferson county, by whom he has had two children: Ruth, and Oscar who died in infancy. Mr. Totman is a Republican and has been highway commissioner one term. He is a member of the Good Templars, and also a member of the G. A. R. Mr. Totman and wife and their two elder daughters are members of the M. E. Church.



From Ontario County Journal 31 December 1886; News from Reed's Corners;


Geo. W. Tozer,
was born in the town of Hopewell, in this county in 1826. When but a small lad his father moved to Reed's Corners, and lived here, or in this vicinity for many years. From him the son learned the wagon maker's trade, in the days when wagons were not made by machinery. Some of their work, furnished by them 35 or 40 years ago, is still in use. The subject of this sketch, from the time he learned his trade, has followed that business ever since in this place. Machinery has taken the place of hand labor to such an extent that comparatively few wagons are now built from the rough material, and in small places that class of labor has been succeeded by work almost wholly confined to repairs. In this line there are few who can do a better class of work than is done at Reed's Corners.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George W. Tozier, Gorham, was born in Hopewell July 13, 1826, a son of John Tozier, an early settler of Hopewell, whose first wife was Charlotte Hubbell, by whom he had five daughters and a son, George W. His second wife was Joanna Osburn by whom he had two children. Mr. Tozier was twice afterwards married. He came to Gorham and lived a number of years, then went to Clifton and afterwards to Canandaigua where he died, aged seventy-three years. He was a wagonmaker by trade, and a Democrat and was an active politician. He was well read in law and at one time did quite an extensive business as a pettifogger. George W. worked with his father until the latter sold his property in Gorham and has for the last forty years manufactured carriages and wagons at Reed's Corners, in which he has been very successful. He is a Democrat and a member of I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 236 at Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


James H. Tozier,
Naples, was born in the city of New York, April 16, 1863, and came to Canandaigua in 1865, lived there until 1877, and then removed to Naples, Ontario county, where he has resided since. He was educated at the public schools in Canandaigua. When he first came to Naples he worked on a farm, and commenced the retail furniture and undertaking business in 1884. Mr. Tozier was married April 26, 1887, to Mary Byington, of Naples. He was elected supervisor of the town of Naples in 1891 and re-elected in 1892.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

George S. Trant, was born at Charlotte, N. C., on November 12, 1878, the son of John H. and Ada Culpepper Trant. He was educated in Norfolk and Portsmouth Academy. For the past six years Mr. Trant has been vice president and general manager of the Patent Cereals Company. He was a past president of the Geneva Rotary Club, president of the Geneva Country Club, a member of the Chamber of Commerce of United States, a trustee of Geneva General Hospital and of the Geneva Savings Bank and a member of the Seneca Yacht Club. He was a member of the North Presbyterian Church. He was a member of the Military Intelligence Bureau during the World War. He married Reba Cole Trant of St. Louis, Mo., in New York City on December 26, 1919. Mr. Trant resided at 169 Maxwell avenue. His death occurred Dec. 18, 1931.



The following is from “Family Sketches” in the History of Ontario County, George S. Conover, 1893, pages 191 and 192.  Donated by Richard Travis; thank you Richard. (Note:  Added the words in parentheses for clarity.)

“Travis, Rufus W., Bristol, was born August 7, 1835, in Bristol.  His father was John B., son of Robert L., a native of Orange County, (NY).  (Robert L. was) born in 1762, who when a young man, went to Pike County, PA., where he married and had four sons and three daughters.  Here (in Pike Co., PA) he spent his life (up to 1837), and for eighteen years (1837 to 1855) lived with his son, John B. Travis (in Bristol), and finally went to Port Jervis (NY), where he died in 1859.  John B. Travis was born in Pike County, Pa., September 1, 1812.  In 1830 he came to Bristol, and married in 1833 Maria Young of Canandaigua, born January 28, 1814, a daughter of Israel Young, a native of Cattaraugus County (NY), and an early settler of Canandaigua, and they had three sons and three daughters.  Mrs. Travis died June 30, 1844, and September 15, 1844, Mr. Travis married Louisa Tower of Bristol, by whom he had a son and a daughter.  He died September 6, 1857, and his (second) wife died in 1872.  Rufus W. was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools of Bristol. Except for eighteen years of his life spent as harness-maker, he has been a farmer.  Mr. Travis married, July 29, 1855, Sallie M. Gardner, born in Bristol, August 23, 1836.  She was a daughter of Richard Gardner of Bristol.  September 9, 1862, Mr. Travis enlisted in Company H, Fourth N.Y. Heavy Artillery, and served until August 3, 1865.  He was on garrison duty until March, 1864, when he went into the field.  He participated in the following battles:  Wilderness, Ny River, Strawberry Lane, Reams Station, Petersburg, Deep Bottom.  August 25, 1864, at Reams Station, Mr. (Rufus) Travis was taken prisoner, and for three and a half months was confined Libbie and Belle Isle prisons.  When released he went into the commissary department at Annapolis, and June 1, 1865, was transferred to Baltimore, and was clerk in the headquarters office at the Jarvis General Hospital (General Hospital #10), where he was discharged at the close of the war.  Mr. Travis returned to Bristol, and except for four years in Nebraska, his life has been spent in that town.  He now owns 131 acres, and follows general farming and hop growing, having fifteen acres of hops.  Mr. Travis is a Republican, and in 1880 and ‘81 was collector of Bristol, and in 1890-93 was elected justice of the peace.  He and wife are members of the Royal Templars of Temperance of Bristol Center. Mr. Travis is a member of the G.A.R. Lillie Post, 303.  They have seven children, of whom two died in infancy, Addie, and Cozy, and those living are:  William B., educated in Canandaigua Academy, was a teacher many years, but at present is a commercial traveler. He married Jennie Crandall of Bristol, by whom he had two children:  Grace E., and Fred A. The second child was George R., educated in Canandaigua.  He married Anna Garrison, and had three children:  Louis E., Mary A., Etta C.  George R. was a teacher, but at present is engaged with the Geneva Optical Co.  John R. was educated in Canandaigua. He is at present one of the firm of Travis & Moore, of Belding, Mich.  Mary L. was educated in Geneva Union and Classical School, Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, and graduated at Geneseo Normal and Training School in 1891, and has since been a primary teacher in Belding, Mich.  Charles R., the youngest child, is at home.”



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Fred E. Treat, of 72 Bristol street, Canandaigua, was born in South Bristol, June 27, 1857, a son of Richard S., who has made his home in Bristol for forty years. He is a native of Vermont, and has always followed the carpenter trade. He has three children: Richard S. Jr., a carpenter of Canandaigua; Flora A., of South Bristol; and Fred E. Until 1878 the latter made his home in South Bristol. He was educated in the common schools and Naples Academy, and on leaving school took up the trade of his father. In 1878 he came to Canandaigua, where he was employed by Contractor King six years, and followed various other employments until October, 1889, when he took his first contract, and since then has built some of the best residences and public buildings in this section. During 1892 he built a saloon and residences in Canandaigua, the Dwyer block, one of the finest in the town, the Quigley block, and four residences, besides repair work. He is a Mason and also a Republican.  He married in 1884 Cora M., daughter of Calvin Crane, a farmer of Hopewell.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Cyrus Trickey, Canandaigua, was born on the homestead in Academy, May 6, 1860, the only son of Jeremiah Trickey. He was educated in the common schools and at Canandaigua Academy under Prof. N. T. Clarke, and assisted on his father's farm until he was twenty-five. In 1884 he was appointed postmaster for the Academy office, and the next year built a store here which he has since conducted. He carries a general line of merchandise of all kinds, and controls the trade of Southern Canandaigua, and of Bristol and South Bristol. He has always taken an active interest in the Republican party, but has never been an aspirant for office. He married, November 28, 1883, Anna L., daughter of Harrison Phillips, of Canandaigua, and they have three children: Hazel L., born February 2, 1886; Katie A., born November 28, 1888; and Alma, born July 6, 1892.  In addition to his store Mr. Trickey conducts a farm of 123 acres in Canandaigua, and also owns a residence and lot of seven acres near Academy school-house.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Jeremiah Trickey,
Canandaigua, was born in Monroe, Orange county, June 14, 1836.  His father, Stephen, was a native of the same county, where he was born February 23, 1808.  He was a son of David, a native of Orange county, who had eight children of whom Stephen was the oldest.  He was for twelve years superintendent of the Townsend Iron Works in Orange county, and in May, 1837, came to Ontario county to superintend a farm of 749 acres owned by Townsend in Bristol, a position he filled until April 2, 1847, when he bought a farm on the Academy tract of Elam W. Crane.  He was a Republican and a supporter of the church, and at the time of the establishing and building of the Union church, he was treasurer of the society.  By his death (June 13, 1887), this section lost one of its most prominent men; liberal and charitable to a fault and honored and respected by all who knew him.  He married when about twenty-eight years of age, Hannah Davenport of Orange county, and had four children; the two sons only survive:  John D., a farmer of Chapinville; and Jeremiah, our subject.  The boyhood of the latter was spent on the farm in Bristol, where he was educated in the common schools and assisted on the farm until 1884, when he bought the farm of his father, and has since been the owner.  For fifteen years previous he had conducted the farm on shares for his father.  Mr. Trickey has always taken an active interest in public affairs.  He has always been in active business, and in addition to farm duties has been an extensive buyer of stock in the west and at home. He married March 27, 1859, Keziah A., daughter of Cyrus Coville of South Bristol, and they had three children:  Cyrus, a merchant of Academy; Alice, wife of John Sutton; and Sarah, wife of Irva Phillips, who works the homestead farm for Mr. Trickey.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robert D. Trimble, Gorham, was born in Wayne county, November 11, 1840, a son of John and Jane Trimble, natives of Scotland, who had seven sons and two daughters. About 1820 they settled on a farm in Wayne county. The mother died in 1854 and the father in 1867. Robert D. was educated in Auburn High School, and resided in Wayne county until twenty years of age, when he went to Webster and there in 1863 married Frances, daughter of Benjamin H. Randolph, of Monroe county, and they had two daughters, Robertie F., and Edith L. In 1863 Mr. Trimble enlisted in the First N. Y. Veteran Cavalry, serving two years, and was for eighteen months color bearer. He was at Winchester, Strassburg, Fisher's Hill, New Market, Piedmont, and other skirmishes. At the close of the war he engaged in farming in Webster until 1887 when he purchased 160 acres in Gorham. He is a breeder of Jersey cattle. He deals extensively in apples and in red and black raspberries. He has the only evaporator in the town, and last season evaporated between 5,000 and 10,000 bushels of apples, and from two to three tons of raspberries. Mr. Trimble is a Republican and has been commissioner of highways several terms. He and family are members of the Baptist Church at Middlesex. He was deacon of the Webster Baptist Church for some years. He is a member of the G. A. R. No. 672 at Webster, and of the A. O. U. W. at Rushville.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

William Henry Truesdale, who was for many years Superintendent of the Geneva Public Schools, was of English descent. He was born near Rochester, October 30, 1844. After being graduated from the University of Rochester, he studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 1869. He never practiced law but devoted himself to the profession of teaching. After teaching the rural schools, he became principal of the Nunda Academy in 1870 to 1875. He was next principal at Olean and then at Jamestown. From there he went to the Mohawk high school and a year later was elected Superintendent, which position he held until his death in August 1913.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Frederick Turck, Geneva, was born in the town of Seneca (now Geneva) August 7, 1828.  He was educated in the public schools and has always followed farming.  Mr. Turck is not married.  His father, Andrew, was born in the town of Guilderland, Albany county, in 1798, and came here with his parents in 1807.  In early life he was a glass-blower and afterwards a farmer.  He married Catherine Turner of Geneva, formerly of his native place, and they had eleven children: Abram, Elizabeth, who died aged seven years; Andrew J., James, Henry, Catherine, Sophia, Frederick, George, who died recently; Amelia and Margaret.  He died November 25, 1888, and his mother in 1857.  His father's brother, Samuel Turck, resides with Frederick Turck, aged eighty-seven years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Turck, M. D., Clifton Springs, was born in Ontario county, October 5, 1858. He received an academic education, and eventually graduated from the Buffalo Medical College in 1886. He commenced practicing his profession at Orleans, this county, and after one year moved to Clifton Springs, where he enjoys a lucrative practice. Dr. Turck married Emma Williamson.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The late Thomas C. Turner, was born on the homestead April 22, 1817, was educated in the public schools, and was a farmer. December 31, 1845, he married Nancy M. Ellis, of Victor, and they had five children: Henry E., Isabel C., Jennie S., Emmett B. who died at the age of 16 years, and William H. was born May 2, 1862, was educated in the public schools and is one of Victor's enterprising farmers. He married Lizzie E. North, of Canandaigua, and they have one son, L. Ellis, born November 14, 1885. His wife died March 28, 1886. Thomas C. died February 27, 1874. Horace, father of Thomas C., was a soldier in the War of 1812. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The late Anson Tuttle, Farmington, father of Richard A., was born in the town of Seneca, August 9, 1822. He was educated in the district schools, and after his father sold his farm became a wood-worker in the railway shops at Canandaigua. October 7, 1856, he married Amanda M., daughter of Wilmarth and Saloma Smith, of Farmington. They had six children: Caroline A. married Carl C. Herendeen, of Macedon; Annie I. married Edward W. Stephenson, of Farmington; Mary A.; Joseph W., who married Elizabeth C. Padgham, and have two children, Mary E. and J. Eugene; Richard, who resides on the homestead with his mother; and Nettie E., who died December 17, 1882. Mrs. Tuttle's father, Wilmarth Smith, was born in this town on the farm now owned by Cole Brothers, known as the "stock farm," which was part of the original purchase, and the part now owned by Amanda M. Tuttle was also part of the same purchase, on April 13, 1792; she was the second white child born in the town. In 1812 he married Saloma Eddy, of Northampton, Mass., and had eleven children. Her grandfather, Jonathan Smith, was born in North Addison, Vt., about the year of 1770, and married Lydia Wilmarth, of his native place. They had these children: Wilmarth, Asa, Orrin and Amanda. Mrs. Tuttle's brothers and sisters were: Dollie, Daniel P., Chloe P., Abel W., Annie H., Lydia E., Nancy H., Amanda M., Mary M., Darius C. and Orrin B.  Mrs. Tuttle's father, Wilmarth, was in the War of 1812.



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