"Sn" to "Sz"




From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The late John J. Snyder, Victor, was born in Hallsville, Montgomery county, September 24, 1850. He was educated in the common schools and Fort Plain Academy and in early life was a farmer. September 1, 1874, he married Libbie, daughter of George W. and Catherine (Wagner) Johnson, formerly of Cooperstown, Otsego county. They came to Victor March 15, 1877. Mr. Snyder was in the coal and lumber business with T. M. Norton  and died April 9, 1889, as the result of an accidental injury received in their lumberyard. Mrs. Snyder's father, George W. Johnson, was born in Cooperstown, Otsego county, and was a miller by occupation. In 1849 he married Catherine Wagner of Fort Plain, Montgomery county. They had two children: Minerva R. (now Mrs. Theodore M. Norton) and Libbie.  The ancestry of the family is English and German.  Mrs. Snyder is a member of the Universalist church. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William H. Snyder, Gorham, was born in Gorham, July 31, 1820, a son of John, who was a son of George, a native of Germany, who early settled in New Jersey and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He died in Gorham. John Snyder was born near New Brunswick, N. J., August 4, 1777, and married Catharine Cortleyou, a native of New Jersey, born September 28, 1784, and they had two sons and eight daughters. In 1807 Mr. Snyder came to Gorham and became an extensive land owner. His wife died in 1827, and he married second Mary Van Norsdall, by whom he had two sons and a daughter. July 5, 1857, he married third Rachael F. Parsons, and he died in 1863. William H. Snyder was educated in the district school and followed farming until 1886, since which time he has lived retired from active life in Gorham. He owns over four hundred acres of land, and for the last thirty-two years has been a Democrat. In 1845 he married Phoebe, daughter of William and Mary Hankinson, natives of New Jersey, who came to Gorham in 1830, and had two sons and three daughters. The children of William H. and wife are as follows: Willard J., Myron H., and Oliver F., all farmers of Gorham.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Jerome P. Southerland, Gorham, a native of Potter, Yates county, was born July 10, 1831. His father, James, a son of David, was born in Potter and married Theda Prouty, by whom he had eight children. He died in 1836. Jerome P. was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. In 1855 he married Sarah C. Clark of Seneca, a daughter of Samuel B. Clark, whose father, David, was a native of London, England, and in an early day came to Seneca. The wife of Samuel B. Clark was Margaret Robson, a native of Seneca. Subject and wife have had three children: Ora and Frank (deceased) and Frank C. Mr. Southerland came to Gorham in 1868 and purchased eighty acres of land, which he has increased to 130. He is a Democrat in politics. Frank C. Southerland was born in Gorham, February 10, 1872, and educated in Canandaigua Academy. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and of the Good Templars Lodge.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Dr. Samuel Southworth, Geneva, was a native of Vermont, but came as a young medical practitioner to New York, living a time at Angelica and Dansville and located permanently at Geneva about 1825. He was twice married, his first wife being Margaret Van Campen, by whom he had two children; and his second wife being Clarissa, widow of Joel Rice. The children of the second marriage were: Samuel Jr. and Martha Southworth. Samuel Jr., the subject of this sketch, was born October 11, 1828. He early became a clerk in a store but at the age of sixteen years, went to sea on a sperm whaling voyage and on his return, worked for six years in the Geneva post office.  In 1855 he became clerk in the Bank of Geneva, and thereafter advanced to the position of teller and later to cashier, holding the latter until 1868, when he resigned and engaged in private banking, and the management of an extensive insurance business of which he then became proprietor and both of which he has ever since conducted successfully. In 1851, Mr. Southworth married Ansley Louisa Evans, by whom he has had two children.  In politics, Mr. Southworth is a firm Democrat and has held the office of supervisor and president of the village. 



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

James M. Soverhill was another conspicuous Geneva citizen. He was born at Newark, N. Y., January 14, 1807, and died in Geneva, March 24, 1885. Soon after coming to Geneva and when about sixteen years of age he apprenticed himself to John Hogarth, a tailor, planning then to follow that trade for a livelihood. He and the Reverend William Hogarth worked side by side as apprentices in this shop. Young Soverhill, however, did not continue in the tailor business, but soon began an active business career which eventually accumulated for him a large fortune. He became one of the large real estate holders in Geneva, and built business blocks and several residences in different sections of the town. Mr. Soverhill was named for President James Madison, but he always shrank from using the second name for fear that it might make him appear conspicuous. Mr. Soverhill was married three times. He first married a Miss Crawford and after her death her sister became his second wife. They had two daughters, one of whom married Thomas McBlaine of Geneva and the other became the wife of John H. Bissell, Esq., of Detroit. Mr. Soverhill's third wife was Miss Mary F. Platt of Long Island.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Simon Spangle, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, June 29, 1833. His life occupation has been farming. October 14, 1856, he married Harriet, daughter of Christopher Fosher, an early settler of Seneca.  His wife was Mary Hammond, by whom he had three sons and three daughters. He was a captain in the State militia, and died in 1884, and his wife in 1889.  Mertie, an adopted daughter of Simon Spangle and wife of Charles Gardner of Hopewell, died in March 1885. In politics, Mr. Spangle has always been a Democrat, but has never aspired to public office. He and his wife are members of the M. E. church at Hopewell Centre.  Philip, a twin brother of Simon, now owns the homestead. He was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools. October 14, 1856, he married Mary E., daughter of Thomas and Lucinda (Porter) Ottley, who had fourteen children. Mr. Ottley was a native of England and when eighteen years of age, came to America, where he was a surveyor.  He was supervisor of Hopewell a number of years and also justice of the peace.  He was superintendent of county poor for twenty-five years, and was at one time a member of the assembly.  He died in 1856, and his wife in 1853.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Willet M. Spangle, Canandaigua, was born in Seneca, November 18, 1850, a son of Zachariah, a jeweler of Canandaigua.  Until fifteen years of age, he made his home with his parents in Seneca Castle, who kept a hotel there at the time of his birth, and on their removal here, he entered Canandaigua Academy. After leaving school he acted as clerk with E. Wenebeck, with whom he remained for twelve years.  In 1882 he formed a co-partnership with F. W. Kinde in the clothing and merchant tailoring business which existed until 1891, when Mr. Spangle sold his interest to Mr. Kinde and bought the furnishing goods store of C. H. Maggs, adding to it the ready-made clothing and merchant tailoring business.  Mr. Spangle is one of the leading merchants of the town, and carries a large stock of ready made clothing, men's furnishing goods, trunks, bags, etc. His store is located at 208 Main street and occupies two floors. He married in 1875, Anna A. Godfrey of Geneva. In 1889, Mr. Spangle was elected member of the village council, and in 1890 became president of the village. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge, No. 236, I. O. O. F., in which he as been Noble Grand a number of times.




From "Who's Who in Railroading in North America, Issue 7." Simmons-Boardman, 1913.

Spangle, William Granger, Division Freight Agent Pennsylvania Rd. Office Altoona, Pa. Born Aug. 28, 1867. near Canandaigua, N. Y. Educated in the public schools of Ontario County, New York; then to Oct. 1, 1885, served apprenticeship as telegraph operator at Orleans and later at Seneca Castle, N. Y., on the Canandaigua division Northern Central Ry; Oct. 13, 1885, to Feb. 26, 1892, successively agent, telegraph operator and freight and passenger agent same road at Phelps Junction, N. Y.; Feb. 26, 1892, to April 1, 1903, agent same road at Newark, N. Y.; April 1, 1903, to Jan. 1. 1909, freight agent at Philadelphia & Erie Rd at Milton, Pa.; Jan. 1. 1909, to date, division freight agent Pennsylvania Rd at Altoona, Pa. [page 510]
Thanks to Martha Magill for this contribution.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Zachariah Spangle, Canandaigua, was born in Hopewell, December 30 ,1820, a son of John and grandson of Zachariah.  The family is of German descent. Three brothers, John, Jacob and Zachariah Spangle, lived near Selin's Grove, Pa., and Zachariah moved into Seneca county about 1805, where he remained but one year, when he came to Hopewell, one of the earliest settlers there. He had four sons and two daughters, the sons being: George, Jacob, John and Simon. John, the father of the subject, was born in 1798, and from the time his parents moved into Hopewell, he always made that town his home. He married in 1818, Catherine, daughter of John Price, who was even an earlier settler than Mr. Spangle, and they had six children, four of whom survive: Zachariah, Philip, and Simon of Hopewell and Mary E. Fisher of Canandaigua. The early life of our subject was spent in the towns of Hopewell and Seneca, where he followed farming. In 1862 he engaged as a commercial traveler and followed this until 1884. In 1866 he moved into Canandaigua and when he left the road in 1884, he, with his son Edward, established the jewelry and repairing store they are now conducting. Mr. Spangle married in 1843, Lavina Hipolite, by whom he had three children: Wilson J., Marion Willett and Isabelle, wife of Daniel Roswell. Mrs. Spangle died in 1855, and he married second, Amanda Duygan and they had two children, Edward and Clara C., wife of Stanley Worth. Mrs. Spangle died in 1865, and he married his present wife, Myra Dibble. 



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. John A. Spengler, a leading Geneva eye specialist, was born in Geneva, March 10, 1868. Graduating from Geneva High School he entered Hobart College and was graduated in 1893. Subsequently he studied at Cornell University, taking the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 1895. He then attended medical lectures at the University of Buffalo, graduating as a Doctor of Medicine in 1899. He began practicing as a specialist in ophthalmology in 1899 and has one of the best equipped laboratories for this kind of work anywhere in Western New York.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edwin Stacey, Manchester, was born in East Palmyra, December 28, 1822. In 1856 he bought the farm at Halliday's Corners, from Judson Hoes, and has since conducted it most successfully. Mr. Stacey has been twice married. His first wife was Caroline Luce, and some time after her death he married Martha Jane Hillman. He has one child, being issue of his second wife. Mr. Stacey has served repeatedly as inspector of elections, school trustee, etc., and is much beloved and respected by all. His ancestors originally were from the New England States. They participated in the Revolutionary war, and also that of 1812.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Milton J. Stafford, Victor, was born in Victor, August 10, 1830. He was educated in the common schools and until the year 1874 followed farming as an occupation since that date. He has been an extensive dealer in wool and also a cattle broker. May 16, 1861, he married Catherine A., oldest daughter of David and Sophia Clark, of his native town, and they have had three children, two sons and a daughter: George, who died in infancy; Jennie, who resides with her aunt, Mrs. Simonds; and Willie J., who is engaged with Frank Pimm, under the firm name of Pimm & Stafford. Mrs. Stafford died April 10, 1889. Mr. Stafford's father, Samuel, was born December 31, 1783. He married Nancy Ferguson, of his native town, and they have had ten children, four sons and six daughters: Betsey, Amos, Sally, Rachel, Emily, Polly, Samuel, Nancy, George W. and Milton J. The family came to this county in 1826, and the three younger children were born in Victor. Mr. Stafford is a member of Milnor Lodge No. 139, F. & A. M., and has been its master twice. He is also a member of Excelsior Chapter No. 169, R. A. M. In politics he is a Republican, and has been highway commissioner on seven different occasions. The family is of English and Scotch descent.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Thomas Standish, South Bristol, is the second son of Jonathan B., who was born in Vermont in 1810, and came with his parents when two years of age to South Bristol. In 1829 he married Polly Hoage, and they had eight children, five sons and three daughters. He lived in South Bristol till 1865, then removed to Michigan, and in 1889 moved to West River, Yates county, where he died in 1890, his wife having died two months previous. Five children survived them. George Thomas was born in South Bristol, June 24, 1833, and was educated at the common schools, with the exception of two terms at the Lima Academy. Mr. Standish followed boating on Canandaigua Lake for twenty-four years, and for twenty years was contractor for ties for the N. Y. C. R. R. Co. He is now engaged in overseeing his farm in South Bristol. In 1868 he married C. Adelaide Carpenter, daughter of Robert O. Carpenter of Naples, and they have three children: Dora A., Edna A., and George Q., all attending school, the former at the Normal School at Brockport, and Edna A., at the Union School at Canandaigua.  Mr. Standish has been supervisor of South Bristol three terms, and has filled several minor offices in the town.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles W. Stark, Gorham, was born in Canandaigua, August 25, 1837, a son of Jedediah, a son of John, a native of Connecticut. Jedediah was born in Salisbury, Conn., September 15, 1808. In early life he moved with his mother to Canandaigua, where he kept a hotel and lumber yard. September 4, 1838, he married Annie Fowler, born April 21, 1897, at Gorham, on the farm now occupied by Charles W. Stark. Her father, Reuben W. Fowler, was born August 2, 1778, in Connecticut and died September 17, 1856. Reuben married Cecil Sawyer, February 24, 1806. She was born May 25, 1782.  They had three sons and one daughter. His wife died at the age of seventy-five years. Jedediah Stark had seven sons and three daughters. He died September 1, 1889, and his wife in September, 1881. Charles W. Stark was educated in the common schools and graded schools of Penn Yan. August 30, 1862, he enlisted in Co. F. , One Hundred Forty-eighth N. Y. Vols., and served until March 16,1865, when he was wounded and taken to the hospital at Fort Darling, remaining until his recovery, when he was honorably discharged. From April 15 to May 16, he was in skirmishes and battles before Petersburg. Mr. Stark has been twice married, first in 1865 to Frances Sawyer, a native of Middlesex, who died in 1869. He married second, Mary Welfare, December 31, 1874. She was born in England in 1850, a daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Welfare, who came to Philadelphia in 1854, and afterwards to Hopewell where they now reside. They have four children.   The children of Mr. and Mrs. Stark are: Edward B., Charles L., Celia M., Nellie E., Lansford B., Mabel L., Thomas W., Oscar S.  Mr. Stark is a Republican and a member of Scott Post G. A. R. No. 319, at Rushville. He has been in the mercantile business at Rushville and Rochester and has also kept hotel at Canandaigua. He is now a farmer in Gorham.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

E. A. Stearns, Gorham, was born in Gorham, July 27, 1859, a son of Addison, he a son of Jonathan, a native of Upton, Mass., whose wife was Sarah Tufts, by whom he had twelve children. In 1803 Mr. Jonathan Stearns settled on a farm in Gorham, near Reed's Corners, and there died in 1863. Mrs. J. Stearns died in 1860. Addison was born in Gorham in 1818.  His wife was Eliza J. Fisher, born November 11, 1826, and was one of seven children of Samuel and Jane (Wilson) Fisher, natives of Pennsylvania and early settlers of Gorham. Mr. Addison Stearns and wife had two children: Charles F., who died aged two and one-half years, and E. A.  Mr. Addison Stearns died in 1887. Subject was educated in the common schools and in Canandaigua Academy.  He married Manette Pearce, a native of Middlesex, Yates county, by whom he had three children: M. Josie (deceased), Irving P., and Laura. Mr. E. A. Stearns is a Republican and a farmer, as was his father and grandfather.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. Francis Lansing Stebbins, one of Geneva's leading physicians, was the the son of Dr. James H. Stebbins, of this city. Dr. F. L. Stebbins was born in 1866. He was educated in the public schools and graduated from Hobart College in 1888. His medical degree was conferred in 1891 by New York University, following which he was for two years at the Rochester City Hospital and after which in 1894, he came to Geneva, and set up practice, which he still continues.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Elisha Steele, East Bloomfield, was born where he now resides, August 22, 1812, a son of Elisha, who came from Connecticut just after his marriage (about 1794) and settled on 300 acres, where he lived until his death in December, 1812.  His wife was Anna Brown, who lived to be almost ninety-seven years of age. They had eight children:  Harriet, born in Bloomfield, July 11, 179-; Elmira, born September 13, 1797; Edward, born September 11, 1799; Samuel H., born July 4, 1802; Garrett, born November 6, 1804; Marina, died in infancy; Anna, born July 10, 1809; Elisha, born August 22, 1812. He was reared on a farm, and received a common school education, supplemented by an academic course.  When he was sixteen years old, his brothers moved to Michigan, and he assumed charge of the homestead, of which he now owns 150 acres, which he has improved with fine buildings. He has served as supervisor, elected by the Republican three years, and was active in getting the R. W. R. R. built through his town. February 19, 1839, he married Olive Norton, born in East Bloomfield, a daughter of Reuben and Clarissa (Steele) Norton, originally of Connecticut, who had twelve children. Subject and wife had four children: Clarissa, who died aged 14 years; Edgar H., born October 14, 1840, enlisted in October, 1861, in the Eighty-Fifth N. Y. Vols., and was wounded at the Battle of Fair Oaks. He was taken prisoner and sent to Libby Prison, dying in June 1862; Horatio S., and Julia A., wife of Wesley Sperry, of Minnesota. Mrs. Steele was a member of the Congregational Church, and died November 27, 1892.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry M. Steele, East Bloomfield, a native of East Bloomfield, was born February 7, 1835. His father, Nathaniel, was a son of Joel Steele, a native of Connecticut, who came to East Bloomfield about 1789, and bought a large tract of land. He built a saw mill and carried on an extensive lumber trade here and in Northern Michigan. He also controlled a bank in Montreal.  Nathaniel was born in East Bloomfield in 1800 and married Clara Gunn, born March 30, 1808, a daughter of Linus Gunn, a native of Berkshire, Mass., born in 1780, who came to East Bloomfield and there married Esther Bronson, born January 7, 1783, by whom he had three sons and one daughter. He died June 2, 1848, and his wife, March 28, 1876, at the age of ninety-three years. Nathaniel Steele had 3 sons: Henry M., Linus G. and Charles E., of whom the subject is the only one living.  Mr. Steele was a contractor at the building of the Erie canal, and later became a farmer. He died in 1865, and his wife in 1888. Henry M. was reared on the farm he now owns and educated in East Bloomfield Academy, Rochester University and graduated from Gregory's Business College of Detroit in 1855. He was a foreman in the steam saw mill at St. Clair, Mich., for three years, and then returned to New York and since followed general farming, owning 125 acres. December 22, 1874, he married Frances E. Howard, a native of Rochester, a daughter of John and Emily (Hubbell) Howard, of Hull, England and Canajoharie, respectively, who had three daughters and a son. The latter died in Arizona. Mr. Howard was a boot and shoe dealer and came from England while a young man. He died in 1871 and his wife resided in Canandaigua. The children of subject and wife are: Cora H., Clara G., Emily H., and Agnes H. Mr. Steele is a Republican and he and wife are members of the Congregational Church of East Bloomfield. Linus G., brother of subject, married Sarah Crittenden of Canandaigua and had four children. He was a Knight Templar, a Mason, and a member  and one of the organizers of Batavia Lodge. He died in October, 1888.  Charles E. Steele, married Agnes, daughter of Henry W. Hamlin.  For nine years he was postal clerk from Rochester to Niagara Falls, and from Rochester to Syracuse; he founded the banking house of Hamlin & Steele of East Bloomfield, and there he remained until his death, March 27, 1885.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Hiram Steele, East Bloomfield, September 13, 1806, a son of Daniel, who was a son of Luke, who was born in Connecticut in June 1739 and died in 1789, being of the fourth generation of that name in this country. He married Esther Cassen and had three children: Harvey, Daniel and Loraine. Daniel was born in 1775 in Connecticut and about 1797, came to Ontario county.  He married in 1799, Lucy Buell, by whom he had 4 children: Charlotte, born October 25, 1800; Marana, born October 13, 1804; Hiram, born September 13, 1806; and Theron, born March 1810. In 1805 he settled on 102 acres which he improved.  He died March 14, 1813. His widow, Lucy, married ____ Baker, and had one child, Daniel Baker. She died in January 1850, aged seventy-two years. After the death of his father, Hiram lived with his uncle, Harvey Steele, until twelve years old and then with Joel K. Salmon, until twenty-one, having earned his own living since his father's death. He worked by the month until March 1832, when he bought with his brother, 135 acres in Bloomfield. Three years later, he sold this, and bought 150 acres in Lima, and seven years later sold his interest to his brother, and farmed on shares for a few years. In 1847 he bought fifty acres and later 140 acres, then sold fifty, and located on 140 acres immediately south of the depot. He now owns twenty acres immediately south of the village. From 1863 to 1866 he was a mail agent on the Central Railroad and has served as constable and collector. He has also been warden of St. Peter's Episcopal Church for sixteen years, still holding the office. He is a Republican.  His first wife was Nancy McH. Turner, daughter of Henry and Mary (Mc Harg) Turner of Albany, by whom he had four children:  Mary E., deceased wife of Colonel C. E. L. Holmes, a manufacturer at Waterbury, Conn.; Charles A. Steele of Geneva; Edward D. of Waterbury, Conn.; and Charlotte A., wife of James S. Elton, a manufacturer of brass at Waterbury, Conn. Subject's wife died May 17, 1878 in her sixty-eighth year. He married second, Harriet, widow of Morris Newton and daughter of Daniel and Abigail (Shepard) Hayden, of Waterbury, Conn. Mr. Hayden was one of the first manufacturers of brass in Massachusetts, and he patented and covered by machine the first button made in that way in the world. Mr. and Mrs. Steele are members of the Episcopal church. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Albert H. Stevenson, Farmington, is the youngest son of William and Charity A. Stevenson.  His father, William Stevenson, was born in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, October 14, 1833, and came with his parents to the United States when he was ten years old, where they first located in Monroe county. He came to the town of Farmington in 1852. January 1, 1855, he married Charity A. Webb of this town, and had two sons: Edward W., who married Anna I. Tuttle, a member of one of the oldest families in the town. They had one son, William A. Albert H., was born August 6, 1859, was educated in the public schools and Canandaigua Academy. March 5, 1884, he married Lottie E. Davis of Farmington. On March 4, 1884, he was elected town clerk and has held the office ever since. William Stevenson was a solider of the late war. January 5, 1864, he enlisted in Company M., Sixteenth Heavy Artillery, N. Y. S Volunteers, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. Mrs. Wm. Stevenson's father, William Webb, was born April 8, 1807 and was educated in the public schools. June 17, 1830, he married Susanna A. Cotton of this town, and they had three children, Charity A., George A. and Isaac H.; both sons are dead. Her grandfather, William M. Webb, was born in Rhode Island and married Elizabeth Sheffield, August 20, 1800,  and came to Albany county at an early day, and in 1819 they came to Farmington. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John Cochrane Stillman, Canadice, was born in Springwater, March 26, 1856. Edwin Sumner Stillman was born in the same town, September 26, 1857. Their father, Edwin Amos Stillman was born in Middletown, Conn., in 1813 and died in Canadice in 1892. He was descended from George Stillman, who came from Steeple, Aspen, England, to Massachusetts in 1680.  Edwin A. was educated at Brown University and Newton Theological Institute, originally intending to enter the ministry. He early became interested in Abolitionism, and worked in the the cause with J. T. Whittier and other noted men, and in the fall of 1833 was a delegate (at Philadelphia) to the general convention of Abolitionists. Seeing the attitude of the churches running adverse to the cause, he could not conscientiously enter the ministry. He became a civil engineer and surveyor, and in the construction of the New York and Erie canal, he held important positions. In 1845 he was engaged in locating the railroad from Canandaigua to Niagara Falls and in its construction as resident engineer. He settled in Springwater in 1854, and was engaged in lumbering and later came to Canadice, where he took an active part in politics as a Republican. He was postmaster under President Lincoln, justice of the peace for many years, was Republican candidate for Assembly in 1861, when he was defeated by Judge Mason, the opposition candidate. He was later a candidate for the same office under the Greenback party, also for state engineer and surveyor. He established the lumber and cooperate business now conducted by his sons, John and Edwin, the firm being E. A. Stillman & Sons, for about thirteen years, until his death.   In 1842 he married Jennie Cochrane, daughter of Rev. James Cochran, a Presbyterian clergyman of Rochester. Seven children survive him: Mabel, who is at home with her brothers, John and Edwin; Ellicott R. and James are in Milwaukee; Alice B., is the wife of C. N. Legg of Coldwater, Mich., and Florence is the wife of F. F. Betts of Wellsboro, Ind.  Mr. Stillman latterly became a Prohibitionist and died June 14, 1892.  John C., married in 1890, Inez Hayward of Richmond and they have two children, Madge and Blanch. Edwin S., married in 1891, Laura Slingerland of his town, and has one child, Onolee. The brothers have 265 acres of land, of which 235 are in timber. They operate a stream saw mill and planing mill, cooperage and feed mill. They manufacture barrels, principally for apples. They also do custom work in the various departments. This is the only establishment of the kind in town.



From Shortsville Enterprise 6 November 1913

J. Morgan Stoddard, one of Shortsville's leading business men, was born in the township of Palmyra on June 20, 1860. His early education was received in district schools. He was married to Miss Nellie E. Gillett at Marion on Dec. 16, 1887. He located in the village of Shortsville on December 16, 1888, and bought out the furniture and undertaking business of E. N. Williamson, which he has since conducted continuously and most successfully. Mr. Stoddard has always been a public spirited citizen and takes an active part in village affairs. He was President of the village for two terms, once in the early 90's and again about 1900. He served as Clerk of Ontario County for two terms from June, 1907, to Dec. 31, 1912. He was one of the few men who succeeded in the incorporation of the village.

At the age of 12 years he hired out to work on a farm and received the sum of $36 for eight months' work. At the end of that time he took the money and walked to Palmyra, a distance of nine miles, and invested $32 in a double-barrelled shotgun. The remaining $4 he spent for ammunition. He conducted a meat  market at Marion for one year, and informs us that during that time he never sold a pound of porterhouse steak for more than a shilling. He also conducted a farm implement and fertilizer business at Ontario for a year and worked for three years as a carpenter. Mr. Stoddard tells of his first year of married life with much pride. He states that his wages amounted to but $4.45 per week and out of that he succeeded in meeting all his household expenses. Rent was only $1 per week. However, he thinks if he had been paid only $4.44, he and his good wife would have had to seek refuge in  the poorhouse. He further states that the cash received from his business in Shortsville from the time of opening, Dec. 16, 1888, to April 1 of the following year, was but $48, which netted him a profit of $16. That came mostly from putting cane seats in chairs.

He is truly a self-made man and it is pleasing to note the rapid strides he has made toward success since coming here. His business has grown to large proportions and is not confined to this section alone. Many orders are given him from various villages and cities in other parts of the State and frequently he ships articles to other States. He has conducted nearly 1200 funerals since his advent here. In other words, he has buried more persons than are living in Shortsville at the the present day. Besides he has been called upon to do many expert jobs for out-of-town parties.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The late Harrison Strong, Victor, was born at Wangom Mills, south of Fishers, nearly three-quarters of a mile. He was educated in the public schools and was a farmer. He married three times, first on January 23, 1840 to Sarah Cansman, she died January 23, 1841; second, on January 20, 1842, he married Martha Buckman, and they had six children: William H., Sarah J., Sherman S., Edward R., Mary A. and Frances A. He married third, on July 2, 1867, Victoria Havill of Rochester, and they had four children: Harrison S., Lyman D., Minerva S., who married Samuel Lewis of the town of Mendon, and they have one son, S. Lloyd; and Frederick M. The three sons reside with their mother. Mr. Strong died March 14, 1882.  Mr. Strong's father, Ralph, was born in Massachusetts and came to Monroe county at an early day, about the year 1800.  He married 3 times: 1st, Sophia Day and 2nd, Lucy Shaw, formerly of Massachusetts. They had four children: Sophia, Harrison, Polly and Milton; the 3rd  wife was a Mrs. Hubbard.  Mrs. Strong's father, Dr. Thomas Havill, was an Englishman of the Norman wing, was born near London, England, in the year of 1805. He was well educated and spent seven years in France.  He was a firm poet and writer, was a skillful physician and surgeon. He married three times, and settled in the city of Rochester, about the year of 1830. He married first, Sophia Taylor and they had two children: Thomas C. and Sophia R.; second Jemima Hill and they had six children: Victoria A., Alice J., Jemima P., Susan, Caroline and Frederick P.; and third,  Louisa Padget, and had ten children. He died in 1874. 



From Geneva Daily Times 10 October 1936

Hall, N Y. - A wave of migration, around the year 1801, from England to this part of New York State, is evidenced by the number of families whose beginnings here date from that time. Of course, every letter "back home", from a satisfied settler, tended to draw others to the same locality so much so in the case of the hamlet which afterward became "Hall's Corners" and "Hall", that it was first known as "the English settlement."

In this year of 1801, in common with the Burrell's, Stokoes, Blakes and others, came Robert and Phyllis Straughan, from Northumberland, with six of their seven children. The eldest son, John, had made his venture into the new world the year before, in 1800, landing at New Orleans. He rode north on a mustang working his way, which must have been adventure hardly second to his later service in the war of 1812. Robert Straughan sprang from a well-known family of Scotch Presbyterian extraction. Thru a history in which appear various spellings and more than one pronunciation of the name, his particular line had settled on the present spelling, pronounced as if "Strawn". The mother, Phyllis Shert Staughan, was descended on the side of her mother, a Davidson, from one of the oldest Scotch border families in the united kingdom. Blessed with a naturally strong personality, she brought with her as well the advantage of a deep active Christian faith, nurtured in a truly pious home. It was in her father's house that the ardent John Wesley first preached at Warkworth, and under the power of his appeal, Phyllis, at the age of fifteen, received a new spiritual life which bore much fruit throughout her remaining years. The little group of Methodists that had taken root near "the English settlement" was to be a congenial setting for Mrs. Straughan. On the long, uncomfortable trip across the Atlantic , too, she needed all the comfort of her faith, especially little Robert, her youngest, suffered all the way with whooping cough. They were eleven weeks on the sea, during three of them becalmed in sight of New York.

Landing at New York, the Straughan family followed a route almost entirely by water to the gateway of the Phelps and Gorham country. The passage up the Hudson was followed by a day's journey overland to Schenectady, where they embarked on the Mohawk river; thence, traveling on various streams and lakes, with some portages, their bateaux reached Geneva, after twenty-one days added to the ocean voyage. The trip had not been a light-hearted one, for the little boy, Robert, had succumbed to his illness and was buried at Schenectady. Geneva was found to be a busy town, boasting a hotel, three stores, a bakery and other enterprises. There was no church, but preaching services in a school-house, the Rev. Jedediah Chapman held near what is now Pulteney Park, foreshadowing the First Presbyterian church.

Eight miles south-west of Geneva, Robert Staughan made his purchase of a potential farm, buying from John and Margaret Hill, of Lancaster Co., Penna., who had acquired the land from Mr. Brockway of Catskill, N. Y. in 1796. By the deed to Mr. Straughan, dated August 29, 1801, he received title to 100 acres of land, comprising all of Lot 61, or Township No. 9, with the exception of fifty acres on the south side which had been previously sold to David Clark. The price was $300. Today the Geneva-Penn Yan state road skirts the farm, one mile beyond Hall, while David Clark's land on the southern boundary is now the home of his great-grandfather, John Crozier. By the year 1838, property surrounding the Straughan farm was owned as follows: south, Samuel Clark; west, Calvin Austin; north, Thomas Vartie; and east, across the road, James Batie and George Crozier, his father, in 1800.

In the fall of 1838, Robert Straughan died, and the farm passed to his children, William, the son at home; Jane, wife of William Brown; and the mother's namesake, Phyllis, who had married Andrew Robson. But Phyllis, the widow, in an interesting document, is found petitioning, according to due process of law, for her dowry rights, and was awarded a life-use of one-third of the farm, with the house thereon, her children putting their signatures to the agreement. The house at that time stood where the present barns are located. Here Mrs. Straughan lived in sociable contentment for a number of years, although her final ones were spent with her daughter, Mrs. Moaw, near Geneva. She lacked only a few months of reaching the age of one hundred and sat in her accustomed rocking chair to the very day before her death. In an obituary notice appearing in the Geneva Gazette of 1856, high tribute is paid by the editor to this remarkable pioneer mother. A picture of her is in existence.

Just fifty years after the exodus from England, in 1851, William Straughan, son of Robert, was seized with the western urge again, and joined the popular movement in that direction selling out his share in the farm. Mr. and Mrs. William Brown, long established on their own place north of the log meeting-house, also sold their claims to the Andrew Robsons, who became the owners of the Straughan hundred acres. An intriguing little story about this second Phyllis, (Mrs. Robson), is that when she came over from England, as a little girl in 1801, on the same ship was her destined husband, Andrew Robson, but, so far as they remembered later, they never met until both were grown when they promptly fell in love. Andrew Robson's naturalization certificate is dated Feb. 21, 1816, at Canandaigua. Mr. Robson's death, in 1852, preceded that of his wife, by thirteen years. Of their fourteen children, their daughter, Mary, had married Henry A. Metcalf, of West River, and to them, Mrs. Robson, while a widow, deeded the farm.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

George S. Stubbs, who operated the lumber business which still bears his name, was born in Hall, June 13, 1867, the only son of Watson E. and Martha (Louw) Stubbs. For a number of years he was engaged in the lumber business with his father after whose death he conducted it for himself. Mr. Stubbs was mayor of Geneva 1919-1922 and served for part of two terms. Mr. Stubbs died May 17, 1928.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

D. A. Sutherland, Gorham, is a native of Potter, born August 23, 1831. He is a son of Alexander, a son of David, who was a native of Orange county and one of the earliest settlers of Yates county.  He was a Baptist minister and was once a member of assembly. Alexander was born in Potter in 1789, and married Maria Van Duzer, a native of Orange county. They had two sons and six daughters. Mr. Sutherland was justice of the peace for fifteen years. He died in 1836 and his wife in 1884, at the age of ninety-four years. David A. Sutherland was educated in Genesee Wesleyan Seminary and in 1853, married Charlotte Cole, a native of Gorham, and daughter of Warren and Mary A. (Ferguson) Cole, of Otsego and Orange counties, respectively. To them were born four children.  He died October 28, 1878 and his wife in 1839. David A. and Charlotte have two daughters, Celia C., who died in 1864, and Charlotte C., wife of James M. Lane of Gorham. Mr. Sutherland spent nine years in farming and then for twelve years kept a hotel at Reeds Corners, N. Y. In 1864 he began as an auctioneer and has since had a very successful business. Since 1869 he has resided in Gorham, engaged in buying wool and produce. He is a Democrat, and has been highway commissioner and notary public. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry C. Sutherland, Canandaigua, was born on the homestead, about two miles west of Canandaigua, December 18, 1844, a son of William Sutherland. The ancestry on the paternal side is Scotch, and the American branch of the family was founded by three brothers who came to this country some time in the eighteenth century. David, grandfather of Henry C., lived in Columbia county, and had nine children, of whom William was the youngest son. He was born in Chatham, December 5, 1800, and in the War of 1812 drove a team for the government from Albany to New York. He married in Columbia county in 1828 Sarah Thompson, of Stamford, Dutchess county, and in 1831 came to Ontario county, moving his goods by canal, himself riding horseback and leading one horse on the towpath. He bought a farm of 300 acres, and for many years engaged in speculation in wool and live stock. In the winter of 1840-41 he went to Chicago, where he was engaged in packing meat, and returned on horseback from Indiana, where he had bought two horses. Of his five children, four survive: Thompson, Eliza, widow of the late John Smith; Lewis, and Henry C. Maria married Ross Crippen, of Penfield, and died February 15, 1865. Henry C. has always lived in this town. He had a common school education and assisted his father on the farm, where he remained until of age, when he bought a farm on the western town line which he conducted till 1885. He then bought his present farm, the Oliver Phelps estate, and that year erected a beautiful residence on the place. Mr. Sutherland is interested in many private institutions, is a director of the Canandaigua Tinware Co., of which he is also vice-president; a stockholder in the Lisk Manufacturing Company, and the Canandaigua National Bank. He married in 1864 Maggie Castle, by whom he had one child, Cora, wife of Wayland Hopkins, of Canandaigua. Mrs. Sutherland died in 1873, and he married second, Lillian, daughter of Addison Wheeler, of East Bloomfield, and they have one son and a daughter, Will H., a student at Canandaigua Academy, and L. Vedah.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lewis T. Sutherland, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, September 25, 1848, a son of William, a native of Chatham, Columbia county, born December 5, 1800. He came to Ontario county about 1833, and settled on a farm adjoining the home of our subject, where he always made his home, and died there January 29, 1889. He married, before coming to Ontario county, Sarah Thompson, a native of Dutchess county, by whom he had five children, three sons and two daughters. One sister, Mrs. Maria Criffen, died in Penfield about 1865. The children living are: Thompson, Eliza A., wife of John, of Canandaigua, and Lewis T. This town has always been the home of our subject. He was given an education in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy, and assisted on his father's farm until twenty-three years of age, when he began farming for himself. In 1883 he bought his present farm, and in 1884 built his beautiful residence. He has always taken an active part in church work, and has been trustee of the Presbyterian church about four years, and is a director of the Canandaigua Tinware company. Mr. Sutherland married Ellen E., daughter of Addison H. Wheeler of East Bloomfield, in 1873, and they have one child, Acey W., of Perkins's hardware store in Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lot D. Sutherland, D.D.S., Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, January 2, 1866, a son of Lewis J. of this town. His life, with the exception of his college years, has been spent in Canandaigua. He was educated at the Canandaigua Academy and then entered the Philadelphia Dental College, from which he graduated in 1887; the same year he opened his present office in the Dailey block, which he has since conducted. Mr. Sutherland is a member of the Congregational church. He is a grandson of John Dailey who died in 1886.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Spencer J. Sutherland, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua on the farm now owned by H. O. Parks, April 7, 1857, a son of Thompson and Polly L. (Sutherland) Sutherland. Subject was educated in Canandaigua Academy under Prof. Clarke and assisted on his father's farm until 1880, when he bought a farm of 150 acres, part of the Sutherland homestead farm, which is used as a stock and grain farm. Mr. Sutherland is also in partnership with his father in wool dealing.  He married in 1879, Mary, daughter of Spencer Bancroft, a farmer in Hopewell. They have two children, Helen F. and Floyd Thompson. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thompson Sutherland, Canandaigua, was born in Columbia county, November 16, 1831. The origin of this family dates back to five brothers who came from Scotland early in the 18th century. The grandfather of the subject, David, was born in Dutchess county previous to the war of the Revolution. His wife was Deborah Husted, and they had five sons and four daughters. William was the third son. He was born December 12, 1800. His early life was spent in Columbia county, where he followed farming until 1833, when he came to Ontario county, shipping his goods and family by the canal, and driving his team on the tow-path. He bought a farm in Canandaigua, adding thereto until at one time he owned about 600 acres. Early in the forties, he engaged in speculation in beef and pork in Chicago, and returned from that city in February 1844, on horseback.  He was engaged in speculation of different kinds, mostly wool and stock, in which he was very successful, and accumulated a vast property, starting under opposition from his native country. He was a Republican and died January 26, 1889. He  married in 1828, Sarah Thompson of Stamford, Delaware county, and they had five children, all of whom were born on the old homestead, except Thompson. Mrs. Sutherland died in 1871, and he married second, in 1873, Mrs. Josephine P. Mesick of Michigan, who died January 18, 1883. Thompson was educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy and has been engaged in farming and speculation in wool and stock. He has always made his home on the old farm until April 1892, when he removed to this village. He married in 1855, Polly L., daughter of Josiah Sutherland, and they have two children living: Spencer J., of the old homestead, and Walter Thompson, who lives at home. The second child, John W., died December 2, 1880, aged twenty-one years. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Sutton, Manchester, was born in the town of Rushford, Allegany County, NY, July 19, 1856. His father settled at Naples, N. Y., where he followed agricultural pursuits. Charles married a Miss Knapp of Ontario county, who succeeded to her father's farm of fifty acres near Clifton Springs. This farm they still own and conduct.  Mr. Sutton is a staunch Republican and is much esteemed in the county.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

Hiram Lloyd Suydam, Geneva, was born in Geneva, April 26, 1822. He was educated in the common schools and at the age of eight years, worked in the Geneva Woolen Factory, afterward at Big Stream, where he remained three years. In 1833 he learned the tailor's trade but only followed it two years. He then learned the harness trade which he followed five years. In 1841 his mother bought the property on Exchange street known now as the International Hotel, and conducted a bakery; he attending to the business and his mother to matters in the house. In 1848 a confectionery business was added; also a partner, A. T. Randolf, with teams on the road with crackers, candies and cigars. This was discontinued after three years. In 1853 he began to conduct a restaurant called "The Gem" which was quite noted. Mr. Suydam retired from business in 1872. May 15, 1861, the 33rd Infantry was organized and Mr. Suydam became its regimental quartermaster, but resigned after four months service. After retiring from business he devoted his time to painting and studying the Scriptures. He has married 3 times, first, April 12, 1842, to Eliza Easter, who was born in England and they had a son, Aldred, who died at the age of seven months. Mrs. Suydam, died January 24, 1846 and he married second, February 24, 1847, Elizabeth Hayward of Geneva, also born in England and they had five children: William H., Grant L., Frederick W., Louisa I. and Anna T., who married Dr. Allen of Gorham. Mrs. Suydam died October 4, 1884. For his third wife, on November 12, 1885, he married Addie Burns, of Geneva, who was born at Ovid, Seneca county.  Mr. Suydam has lost all of his family, except one daughter and his present wife.  The crowning work of his life is upon the "Chart of the Ages," showing forth the fact that we shall all be saved through the two Adams.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Amasa Swan, Richmond, was born in Stonington, Conn., in 1788. When a child he went with Joshua to Saratoga county, where he married Keziah Hanford. In 1818 he settled in Richmond, where Edmund Swan now lives, and bought that farm.  His brother, Peleg, who came soon after, joined him in the purchase, and finally bought Amos's interest and lived and died there. Amos went first to Bristol and five year later to Canadice, where J. M. Hisk now lives and here he spent the remainder of his days, dying in 1844. One son, Seneca, was born in Saratoga county and eight children were born in this county. Two died. Joshua, born in 1819, makes his home with his sister, Adelia, the second wife and widow of Philip Stout, who for many years was a merchant and hotel keeper here.  The hotel is now kept by Mrs. Stout. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Anthony Swarthout, Anthony, Geneva, was born in Barrington, Yates county, February 1, 1833. He was educated in the public schools and has always followed farming. March 25, 1860, he married Eleanor Van Ness of Steuben county, and they have eight living children:  John V., who married Fannie Hull and has one son, Harold S.; Herbert D., who married Lulu Hull, and they have two sons, Homer A. and Wallace H.; Abbie E.; Willis F., who married Edith Jaynes; Susan M.; Miner B.; Russell, and Eva R. Five reside at home. Robbie E. died when nearly two years old. Mr. Swarthout's father, George F., was born in the town of Ovid, October 28, 1790. He married Rowena Russell of Barrington, December 3, 1818, and settled in Barrington in 1819. In 1843 he settled in Milo, three miles south of Penn Yan, where he died July 13, 1853.  They had twelve children, ten of whom grew to maturity. Mrs. Swarthout's father, John Van Ness, was born in New Jersey, and married Eleanor Hankinson, of his native place, and came to Hammondsport, Steuben county. They had two sons and six daughters.  Mrs. Swarthout's uncle, Elijah Rosenkrans, was a soldier in the War of 1812. General McPherson of the Civil war was a cousin of Mr. Swarthout.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Charles H. Sweeney is the son of Thomas Henry and Honora Frances Sweeney. He was educated at St. Francis DeSales School. At the age of 14 he began his active career in his father's real estate and insurance office. Since the death of his father the business continues under the same name conducted by Chas. H., Stephen J. and Mary T. Sweeney. This firm is one of the largest business operators in Geneva today.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Colonel John Sweeney was a prominent citizen of Geneva, a member of one of the early Boards of Trustees, a watchmaker by profession and business. Having a jovial disposition and being a man of the strictest integrity, upright and honorable in all his dealings, he was very popular in the community. He was a lieutenant in Captain Abraham Dox's Company of Light Infantry during the War of 1812; was on the frontier of the State, and when the battle of Queenstown was raging, orders came for the militia at once to cross over into Canada. In the absence of the Captain, Lieut. Sweeney was at that time in command of the Company. Without the least hesitation he obeyed the order and calling on his men to follow, many of them obeyed the command. During the engagement Capt. Sweeney was wounded in the knee by a bullet, carried off the field and brought home on a stretcher which was borne all the way on the shoulders of his comrades. He never recovered from the effects of the wound but was lame all the rest of his life. In 1824 John Sweeney and George Goundry purchased land at Tonawanda embracing that part of the village which lies on the Niagara side of the Creek. In 1825 Mr. Sweeney erected a sawmill there. In 1823  a company purchased five or six hundred acres on the Erie side of the Creek. Soon after these purchases Tonawanda was plotted out as a village.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thomas H. Sweeney, Geneva, son of Edward and Julia (Desmond) Sweeney, was born in Sandy Creek, N. Y., March 28, 1850. His father, Edward, was a large railroad contractor and built twenty-one miles of the R. & W. R. R., three miles of the Potsdam & W. R. R., seven miles of the Utica & B. R. R. R., and was supervisor of the town of High Market, Lewis county, for two years. He was justice of the peace twenty-five years. He is now a resident of West Martinsburg. His wife died in 1883. Thomas H., was educated in the common schools and was trustee of his school district, when fourteen years of age. In 1865, he went to Schenectady and was assistant station keeper for one year.  In 1868, he was first assistant station keeper at Utica.  In February 1870, he was a general store keeper and watchman at Willard Asylum. In 1877 he opened a clothing store at Geneva and was in that business until 1885. He has held the office of excise commissioner from 1880 to 1885, when he was elected police justice of Geneva to fill vacancy for one year, and was then re-elected for full term of four years, which he held until April 1891. In that year he was secretary of the Board of Health and registrar of vital statistics. He is a Democrat and always takes an active part in political affairs. He was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention in 1888, and was president of the Democratic Club for four years, during which time he succeeded in uniting the party so that every office except one in the town and village was filled by a Democrat. In 1875, he was united in marriage with Miss H. F. Donnelly, daughter of William Donnelly, who was one of the early settlers of Lewis county. They have had nine children, eight of whom survive.  Mr. Sweeney is now engaged in real estate and fire, life and accident insurance. The family are members of the Francis De Sales Roman Catholic church and the children attend the parochial school.



From Phelps Citizen 27 March 1890

Philetus Swift
was of Connecticut stock, and came to Phelps in 1789. He first sought to take up land in the Pennsylvania "Northern tier" which he thought belonged to Connecticut. On learning that doubts were in every title, the Swifts came to the Phelps & Gorham purchase. His brother, General John Swift, was an early settler at Palmyra. George Philetus Swift took up land to the east of Phelps village, where he spent the remainder of his life. In 1793 he married Sally, a daughter of Capt. Seth Deane. to them was born one son, Deane Swift, who died in 1818, aged 24 years. The stone home built by General Swift remains a monument of good workmanship. A tablet upon it gives the year of erection. General Swift was a public man in both military and civil affairs. He was kind and thoughtful to the unfortunate. He adopted two or three nephews, whose names have been among the worthy of the town. After the death of his wife in 1823, he married the young widow of his nephew, Capt. Asa R. Swift. General Swift died and was buried with military honors in July 1828, aged 65 years. His widow lived until January, 1880 when she died in Webster, N. Y., at the age of 89 years. Dr. Caleb Bannister, in his excellent sketch of the town of Phelps, pays a worthy tribute to his old friend. A full account of the Swift family was published in THE CITIZEN a few years since.



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