"Sim" to "Sm" Family Sketches




From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Byron S. Simmons, East Bloomfield, a native of Bristol, was born December 23, 1835, a son of Richmond Simmons, who was also a son of Richmond, a native of Massachusetts. Richmond Sr., came to Bristol and settled on three hundred acres of land, on which he built a log house. He was a prominent man and a leading farmer. He married Eleanor Sears, and had four sons and six daughters. He died in Bristol in 1845, and his wife in 1866. Richmond Jr., was born in Bristol, June 1,1 1806. In 1828 he married Hannah R. Wheeler, a native of East Bloomfield, born November 17, 1809, and a daughter of Benjamin D. Wheeler. Their four children were: Caroline M., wife of Freeman Crandle, a farmer of Livingston county, Mich.; Benjamin W., a soldier in the late war, who received a wound while on picket duty, from which he died; Byron S. and Sabra A., deceased wife of Harrison Marble of West Bloomfield.  Mr. Simmons was a farmer and a Democrat in politics. He died February 1, 1862. Mrs. Simmons then married Calvin Wheeler of Michigan, in which place they lived five years. Since the death of Mr. Wheeler in 1882, Mrs. Wheeler has resided with her son, Byron S. Byron was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. November 22, 1864, he married Emma A. Gooding, of Bristol, a daughter of Seymour H. Gooding, who was the son of William C. Gooding, a native of Dighton, Mass., and an early settler of Canandaigua. Seymour H. married Emily Phillips and had three daughters and one son. Mr. Gooding died in 1870 and his wife in 1869. Byron and wife have had two daughters: Florence G., wife of Rev. F. E. Hoyt of North Dakota, who has one child, Alice. Mrs. Hoyt was many years a school teacher and graduated from the State Normal School at Geneseo in 1889. Alice E., her sister, graduated from the same school in 1892 and is at present a teacher in Allegany county. Mr. Simmons is a farmer and in 1868 came to East Bloomfield and purchased seventy-five acres, where he has since resided. He makes a specialty of fruit raising, and is perhaps the largest plum grower in the county. He is a Democrat and has been assessor twelve years. He is a member of the Canandaigua Lodge, F. & A. M.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

C. Rollin Simmons, Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, July 5, 1851, a son of George W, , a farmer of that town. He was educated in the East Bloomfield Academy and on leaving school engaged as clerk in the dry goods store of Ellis & Parmele in Canandaigua, with whom he remained five years. He then acted as clerk for Sherman Kingsbury in his grocery store. He was with him nine years, and then came to the store where he now is a partner, then conducted, by A. Higley. In 1890, Mr. Simmons, in partnership with Charles S. Humphrey, bought out the store No. 3, Tillotson block, which has been a grocery stand ever since the block was erected. The firm of Simmons & Humphrey carry a full line of everything to be found in a grocery store, requiring the assistance of four clerks besides the assistance of both partners. Mr. Simmons is a member of the Canandaigua Lodge No. 294, F. & A. M.  In 1874 he married Alice B. North, by whom he has had one child, Ruby J.  Mr. and Mrs. Simmons are members of the M. E. Church of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles R. Simmons, Bristol, was born in Bristol, November 13, 1854, a son of Elnathan W. Simmons, M. D., of Canandaigua. Charles R. was reared in Canandaigua and educated at the Canandaigua Academy. When twenty years of age he went to Iowa, and for six years followed farming. He then returned to Bristol; he now owns a farm of seventy-five acres.  February 8, 1877, he married Hattie M. Smith of Bristol, an adopted daughter of Philetus Smith, whose father, Daniel Smith, was one of the first settlers of the town. They have had five children, four of whom died in infancy. Warren S. is the only one living. Mr. Simmons is a Republican. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles W. Simmons, Richmond, was born on the old homestead of his father, Sardis, May 21, 1847. He was educated at the Canandaigua Academy under Prof. Clark and subsequently engaged in farming. In 1879 Charles W.  married Otisca L., daughter of Benjamin Carpenter of East Bloomfield, but born in South Bristol, December 30 ,1852. Of their four children: Arthur C. was born August 12, 1880; Nellie B. was born September 20, 1887; Jane Ola was born July 23, 1889; and Carl Richmond was born February 21, 1891. In March 1881, Mr. Simmons bought of M. P. Worthy the store at Allen's Hills, in which he has since been engaged in general merchandise. He has been postmaster of Allen's Hill for twelve years and in politics is a Republican.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edward W. Simmons, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, August 3, 1861, a son of Dr. Elnathan W. Simmons, of Canandaigua.  He was educated in Canandaigua Academy under Prof. Noah T. Clarke, and after leaving school engaged as clerk with Dr. J. T. Smith  in his drug store, with whom he remained about five years, and then bought the store where he had acted as clerk, where J. A. Barker is now located. In 1886 he removed his business to the Moore block, where he is still located and has now one of the finest drug stores in this section on Main street. He carries a full line of drugs and medicines, both patent and proprietary, toilet articles, etc. Mr. Simmons married in September 1890, Lizzie, daughter of O. S. Bacon, of the McKechnie Bank, and they have one child, Margaret Bacon. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Elnathan W. Simmons, Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, June 2, 1811, a son of Richmond, a farmer of that town, who came to this county from Massachusetts in 1794. Richmond Simmons was the son of a Baptist minister of Massachusetts, and married Elinor, daughter of Alden Sears, of English descent. The great-grandfather of our subject, Elnathan Walker, was a colonel in the Revolutionary War. The early life of subject was spent in Bristol, where he attended the common schools until fifteen years of age, when he entered Canandaigua Academy and studied under Prof. Spencer and Prof. House about four years. After leaving school he attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Fairfield, from which he graduated in 1834, and immediately began practice in this town, where the hamlet of Cheshire is now located. He remained there until 1836, when, on the death of his sister and brother-in-law, he went to Rushville and remained until 1840, and then, his father's health declining, he went back to his old home in Bristol. While living there he was elected supervisor, and also justice of the peace.  In 1852 he was elected to the Assembly at Albany.  In 1857 he came to Canandaigua, where he remained until his death, which occurred, after a brief illness, May 13, 1893. In 1858 he was elected county clerk on the Republican ticket, and at the breaking out of the war he went out as surgeon of the One Hundred Forty-eighth N. Y. Vols. Dr. Simmons married in 1850 Maria Pennell of South Bristol, and had three children: Charles R., a farmer of Bristol; Edward W., a druggist of Canandaigua; and Lois E., who lives at home.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Gooding B. Simmons, Bristol, was born October 5, 1835, in Bristol. His father was Benjamin, son of Benjamin, a native of Massachusetts, and an early settler of Bristol, who married Phoebe Gooding. Benjamin Simmons, Jr., was born in Bristol, July 17, 1813.  He married Celia B. Wheeler of East Bloomfield, born November 30, 1813, a daughter of Benjamin D. Wheeler.  Mr. Simmons and wife had two children, G. B. and Juliett, wife of George W. Tilton, of Bristol. He was assessor two terms and died March 16, 1868. His wife resides with Mrs. George Tilton, her daughter. Our subject was educated in the common schools. January 4, 1863, he married Elizabeth C. Owen, a native of Perry, born August 27, 1844. She is a daughter of Francis D. Owen, born in Oneida county, April 4, 1806, who settled in Livingston county and on October 16, 1804 (sic), married Patty Cornell, a native of Bristol. Mr. Owen and wife had six sons and three daughters. He died March 17, 1855 and his wife, July 26, 1862. Gooding B. Simmons and wife have four children: Charles B., Julietta C., Francis M., and Mabel E.  Charles B. is engaged in Canandaigua Hotel; Julietta, widow of William H. Beach of Bristol; Frances M., at home; and Mabel E. at Canandaigua school. Mr. Simmons is a farmer and has been especially interested in horses. He is a Republican, and he and family attend the Universalist Church of Bristol. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry C. Simmons, Canandaigua, was born in Richmond, Ontario county, August 1, 1840. The grandfather, Richmond, was born in Massachusetts. He had four sons: Sardis, George, Richmond, Elnathan W. and five daughters. Sardis, the father of our subject, was born in Bristol, June 22, 1805. When thirty-five years of age he moved on a farm in Richmond, where he died in March 1899. He married Jane L. Jones of Bristol, and they had four children, three of whom are living: Robert B., a farmer of Richmond; Charles W., a merchant of Allen's Hill in Richmond; and Henry C. The early life of our subject was spent in Richmond. He was educated in Nunda Valley, East Bloomfield and Canandaigua Academies, and October 4, 1861, enlisted in the Eighty-fifth N. Y. Vols., serving one year and was discharged October 27, 1862, for disability. During this year he was in the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill, Chapin's Farm and at the Seven Days fight. December 31, 1863, Mr. Simmons re-enlisted in the Fifteenth N. Y. Engineers and served with them until the close of the war, being discharged June 19, 1865, at Elmira. He returned to Ontario county and engaged in farming at West Bloomfield, where he lived until 1873. He lived in Bristol one year, and in March 1874, bought a farm of 136 acres in Canandaigua, where he has since lived. He married November 15, 1865, Adliza, daughter of Albert Treat of Bristol and they have one son, Ralph M. a farmer of Canandaigua.  Mrs. Simmons died September 28, 1878, and he married second, on March 1, 1881, Mary M., daughter of Isaac Abby of Richmond, and widow of Richard Leach of West Bloomfield. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John D. Simmons, Bristol, was born in Bristol, August 6, 1845 and is a son of George W. Simmons, whose father was Richard Simmons. George W. Simmons was born in Bristol in 1813 and educated in Canandaigua Academy. His wife was Cornelia Pool of Bristol, born 1816, who bore him four sons and two daughters. In 1850 he purchased the farm of seventy acres which subject now owns, and here lived and died.  He died in 1877 and his wife, March 15, 1883. Subject of sketch was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of Bloomfield. In 1865 he married Rhoda Blake, a daughter of Lyman Blake. Subject and wife have one child, E. Carroll, who was educated in Canandaigua Union School. He is a farmer by occupation. In 1893 he married Cora Andrews of Bristol, daughter of George Andrews.  Mr. Simmons is a Democrat, and he and family attend the Universalist church at Bristol.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Simmons, Ralph M., Canandaigua, was born in West Bloomfield, February 9, 1868, was educated in the common and Union schools of East Bloomfield, and at Canandaigua Academy under Prof. George R. Smith.  He assisted on his father's farm until reaching his majority, when he bought his present residence on lot eighty-three in the town of Canandaigua.  Mr. Simmons is an ardent Republican, but has been no office seeker.  February 29, 1888, he married Helen R., daughter of Seymour V. R. Johnson of Canandaigua.  They have one daughter, Esther Adeliza.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robert Bruce Simmons, Richmond, was born February 10, 1838, where he now lives. His father, Sardis, son of Richmond of Massachusetts, was born in Bristol in 1804, and married Jane L., daughter of Seth Jones of Bristol. In 1835 he purchased the farm now occupied by Robert B., and in 1852 he built the present residence on the site of one built about 1817. Of their four children, one died in infancy, the others being: Robert B., Henry Clay and Charles W. Robert B. was educated at Canandaigua Academy and Fairfield Seminary. Mr. Simmons taught district school about fourteen years, between 1857 and 1880, and was superintendent of schools in the western district of Ontario county for six years. In 1863 he married Esther G., daughter of Deacon Benjamin F. Phillips of Bristol.  Mr. Simmons is a Republican and a Universalist.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William M. Simmons, Bristol, was born September 13, 1853, a son of John M., whose father was Constant, a native of Bristol, and one of its early settlers. Constant was born in Bristol and was twice married. First, to Ann M. Hyde, by whom he had two children. His second wife, Polly Lee, by whom he had four children. They removed to Michigan, where both died.  John M., was born in Bristol, March 15, 1831. He married Phoebe, daughter of Gooding Packard and had two sons and a daughter. For many years he was an insurance agent. He died July 23, 1873 and his wife, November 19, 1889. William M. was educated in the common schools of Bristol and taught school a short time, afterwards clerking for W. Reed of Bristol Centre. December 24, 1874, Mr. Simmons married Stella A., daughter of Chauncey Symonds of Michigan, and Evelyn Bartlett of Bristol. Mr. Simmons and wife have the following children: One daughter died in infancy; Belle F., and Edith M.  Mr. Simmons is a farmer and in politics a Republican, and was constable and collector for three years. He was elected town clerk in 1892 and re-elected in 1893. 



From Victor Herald 30 March 1900

Albert Simonds was born in Enfield, N. H., October 13, 1808. His parents moved to Troy, N. Y., 1812, and two years afterwards to Newport, Herkimer county, N. Y., about 10 miles from Herkimer village, where his boyhood was passed. He attended the Newport village school, where he obtained his education, and at the age of twenty years entered employment as clerk with a merchant at Poland, a small village near Newport. He remained in that place four years, going from there to Utica, where he obtained employment as clerk in a dry goods store. He remained but a short time on account of cholera, which prevailed there to some extent. About this time Mr. Simonds received a communication from a former acquaintance by the name of Raymond, then in the employ of Nathan Jenks, a merchant of Victor, urging him to come to Victor, which he finally did, making a three days' journey by stage coach from Utica. He entered the employ of Mr. Jenks, with whom he remained six months, then going to Buffalo, but at the earnest solicitation of friends returned to Victor after a short time and resumed his old place behind the counter in Mr. Jenks' store, then located where the Universalist church now stands. Mr. Jenks built a new stone store on the corner, now occupied by A. Simonds Sons, in 1834, Mr. Simonds going with him, and was admitted to partnership in 1837. A few years later Mr. Jenks retired from the business, which was continued by Mr. Simonds, with various partners, until 1885, being succeeded by his two sons, George and C. Lewis Simonds, who are the present proprietors. Mr. Simonds married Electa Hubbel, of Canandaigua, in 1835. Four children were born to them: Albert Burton, who died in infancy; Harriet Eliza Bacon, who died February 18, 1898, A. Burton Simonds, who died July 11, 1882, and Henry Simonds, now residing in Rochester. His wife, mother of the above mentioned children, died in 1844. He married Caroline Mansfield, of Mendon, in 1846, there being three children as the fruit of this union, Mary J., wife of Gilbert Turner, of Rochester, George and C. Lewis Simonds, residents of Victor. Mr. Simonds united with the Presbyterian Church in Victor, in 1837, and was clerk of the Society for many years. About 1858, he was elected elder and deacon of the Church, retaining those offices continuously, and was also clerk of the session, the duties of the latter office being performed for him in latter years by his son, C. Lewis Simonds. He was once delegate to the General Assembly which met at Wilmington, Delaware. He was always actively interested in Church work, especially in the Sunday school, where he was a teacher and superintendent for many years. Although a believer in good government and the enactment of just laws, Mr. Simonds only interested himself in politics as far as his duties as a good citizen might enjoin. He was an abolitionist from principle, but identified himself with the Whig party, afterward a Republican, voting for the first presidential candidate of that party, and for every Republican presidential candidate after, as long as he was able to go to the polls. His was an earnest Christian character of unusual purity and uprightness, of the strictest integrity, of a trustful nature, not looking for dishonesty in others, his daily life in harmony with his principles and professions, with a pleasant and agreeable manner, which won friends and kept them, and it has been said that he did not have an enemy in the world. Mr. Simonds died at the home of his son, C. Lewis Simonds in the village of Victor, January 8, 1899.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Albert Simonds, Victor, was born in Endfield, Grafton county, N. H., October 13, 1808 and came with his parents to Troy, N. Y., when he was about four years old. He was educated in the district schools and for a time resided with a Mr. Hawkins, a brother-in-law of his, afterwards he became a clerk in a general store of Poland. September 7, 1832, he came by stage to Victor, and was a clerk in Nathan Jenks' store for five years. In 1837 he began business on his own account and bought the goods of his former employer, and had several partners as the years passed by, his name always appearing at the head of the company until 1884. Mr. Simonds lived a retired life, enjoying a competency, after an active, honest business career. He has married twice, first in January 1835, to Electa Hubbell of this town, formerly of the town of Canandaigua. They had four children: Albert B., died at the age of four years; Harriet E., who married Orin S. Bacon; Burton, who married Nellie D. Root of this town and died July 11, 1882;  and Henry, who married Jane Wright of Victor and is a merchant in Canandaigua. Mrs. Simonds died November 19, 1844, and he was married second on August 20, 1846, Caroline, daughter of Calvin and Cornelia M. (Roberts) Mansfield, of the town of Mendon, and they have three children: Mary J., who married Gilbert Turner; George, who married Jessie M. Clark; and C. Lewis, who married Bertha M. French; both sons succeeded to their father's business. Mr. Simonds joined the Congregational church in 1837 and was elected church clerk. In 1858 the church became Presbyterian, at which time he was elected a ruling elder, deacon and clerk of the session and has remained in office up to the present time. Mrs. Simonds is also a member.  The following is a tribute to Mr. Simonds from a neighbor: He is a character of singular purity and uprightness and a man of strict integrity and honor.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

M. K. Simpson, Geneva, was born in Orange county, September 3, 1829. He learned the carriage maker's trade and in March 1857, came to Geneva where he has since resided. He had a carriage shop for nine years and August 7, 1862, enlisted in Co. E., One Hundred Twenty-sixth N. Y. Vols., and was mustered out June 6, 1865. He was mostly on detached duty, and was in the battles of Bolivar and Maryland Heights, and was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry. He is a member of Swift Post No. 94.  On December 26, 1854, he married Frances McNeal and had two children, Selina A., wife of John Wagner; and Augusta H., wife of W. R. Groom.  Mr. Simpson is a member of the North Presbyterian church and of I.O.O.F, No. 209, and Grand Lodge of N Y/ State.  In politics, he is a Republican.



From Shortsville Enterprise 27 November 1913

Charles Marcellus Sisco, son of Rev. Martin Sisco, was born in Bangor, Franklin county, New York, on April 19, 1845. He received his education in the public schools and during his boyhood worked on the farm and helped to clear timber land. During the civil war he enlisted in the 98th New York Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, but he was under age and his father refused his consent, but afterward he ran away from home and at Essex, Vermont, enlisted in Company G, 11th Vermont Regiment and went to the front. He was wounded at the battle of Cedar Creek and taken prisoner, but on the second day was retaken by Federal forces. At the hospital where he was taken it was found necessary to amputate his leg. He continued in the service until 1865 when he was mustered out. He went to Malone, N. Y., and learned the trade of harness maker. From 1868 to 1871 he worked at his trade in Canandaigua and for years at Victor. In 1873 he started in business on his own account with a harness shop in Manchester. From 1880 to 1884 he worked again at his trade in Victor and then opened a shop in Shortsville, where he has since lived. He has been successful in business and prominent in public life.

In politics he is a Republican. In 1897 he was elected overseer of the poor and held that office for eight years. For several years he was trustee of the village of Shortsville and its president for two years. In 1906 he was appointed postmaster of Shortsville and has held that position to the present time. He is a member of Herendeen Post, No. 107, Grand Army of the Republic, and was its commander for three years; a member of the local lodge of Maccabees and was its record keeper for four years and commander five; also a member of Parlor Village Lodge, No. 88, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In religion he is a liberal. He was married on December 10, 1883, to Lottie A. Materson Hulbert. They have one daughter, Mrs. Charles Fiero, and two grandsons, Charles Marcellus Fiero and John Alonzo Fiero.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George H. Sisco, Victor, was born in Franklin county, September 19, 1853, was educated in the public schools and came to Victor in the spring of 1872.  Mr. Sisco conducted a first class meat market in this village. December 22, 1877, he married Mary E., daughter of Walter E. and Frances M. Morgan, of Victor, and they have four children: Walter, William, Mary B. and Belle M.  Mr. Sisco's father,  Marvin, was born in Vermont, was a Methodist preacher, and married Malissa Manning of this State, and had six children: Charles M., Harrison, Mary, George H., Silenas and Ella. He died in August 1891. George H. Sisco's wife's mother, Frances A., was the youngest daughter of Dr. William Ball. Dr. Ball  was a practicing physician of this place and county many years, and had the most explicit confidence of his patients, and the whole community.  He married Rachael, daughter of Dr. Beach of Victor, and they had three children: Mary, Frances and Thomas. They also had an adopted daughter, Mary E. Hutchison, now Mrs. Dr. Draper. Mrs. Ball died March 17, 1879. Mrs. Sisco died March 17, 1887.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John F. Sissons, Bristol, was born in Bristol, June 20, 1830, on the farm he now owns. He is a son of Gen. Horatio Sissons, a son of Stephen Sissons, who came to Bristol in an early day. Gen. Horatio Sissons was born in Bristol in 1800, on the farm owned by subject.  He was a school teacher and also a teacher of music, and a self-made man.  He rose to the highest office in military ranks.  In 1824 he married Clotilda Taylor of Bristol, born 1804, daughter of John Taylor of Massachusetts, one of the first settlers of Bristol. They had three sons and five daughters. He was a farmer and stock dealer.  He died in 1867 and his wife in 1852. Subject of sketch received an academic education.  He is a farmer and the oldest but one hop grower in Western New York. He also makes a specialty of raising apples, and owns thirty-five acres of orchard. In 1855, John married Sarah J. Case of Steuben County, daughter of Morgan L. and Eliza (Hunn) Case, who spent most of their life in Bristol, but died in Canandaigua. They have had six children:  Elizabeth A., Stephen H., Louis J., Nora C., Horace C. and Ralph C. Mr. SISSON is a Democrat, and was a member of the Grange when first organized.  He and family attend the Congregational church at Bristol.  Mrs. Sisson died December 17, 1876.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thomas Skidmore, Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, England, October 3, 1841, and came to this country in 1862, locating in Canandaigua, where he has ever since made his home. He first engaged in the hat and cap business with Mr. Maggs, which he followed until April 1869, when he started in the boot and shoe business, which he as continued ever since. His store is at 204 Main street, has a frontage of eighteen feet, by seventy-five deep.  He uses the upper floor for repairing and custom work and as a reserve stock room, and carries a very complete stock of boots, shoes, rubbers, slippers, etc.  Mr. Skidmore married in 1865, Mary A. Halligan of Canandaigua, and they have three children: Anna A., Thomas jr., the furniture dealer, and Frederick, a clerk in the store.  Mr. Skidmore is a member of the F. & A. M. No. 294, and of the M. E. church.
 


From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thomas Skidmore Jr., Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua June 26, 1869, a son of Thomas Skidmore, a boot an shoe merchant of this town. Our subject was educated in Canandaigua Academy under Prof. J. C. Norris, from which he graduated in 1890. The same year he entered Cornell University, where he studied until 1891, returning here to assist his father in his store. He remained with him until November 15, 1892, then established a wholesale and retail furniture store on Main street, the store being about thirty feet front by 150 in depth, occupying three floors for trade, and a basement for reserve stock.  In the rear is a storage and manufacturing establishment, seventy-five feet by 250.  Mr. Skidmore carries a complete stock of everything necessary to furnish a house, from kitchen to drawing room. He is a member of Merrill Hose Co.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Alexander W. Skinner, lawyer, was born at Rushville, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1888, the son of Dr. and Mrs. Wm. W. Skinner. He graduated from Hobart College in 1906, from Syracuse University in 1907, and from the University of Wisconsin in 1908-10. He is active in Democratic politics and has run for office on the Democratic ticket several times. He is a member of the Geneva Bar Association, of the New York State Bar Association, Zeta Psi fraternity; Elks, Moose and Eagles. Mr. Skinner was admitted to the bar in September, 1914, and has practiced his profession here since that time. His wife was Miss May Gannon. They reside in Highland Park.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. William Waddell Skinner is a native of Marengo, Ill., born January 14, 1860. He was educated in the public schools of Prattsburg and later attended the Buffalo University, graduating from the Medical Department in 1887. Prior to taking up the study of medicine he taught for a time in the Prattsburg school. After leaving Medical College he practiced first in Rushville then later in Geneva. Dr. Skinner is still regarded as one of Geneva's leading surgeons and general practitioners.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Skuse, Phelps, was born in Phelps near Oaks' Corners November 14, 1814. Charles, his father, was born in the old country and came to the United States when a boy, settling in New Jersey, where he married Mary Smith, of Monmouth county. They moved to Phelps and settled about 1806, and there lived and died. Charles Skuse married first in 1841 to Ann Sanders, by whom he had five children, three of whom are now living: John, Orville, and Frank, John in the town of Geneva, the others in Phelps. His wife died in 1855 and in 1857 he married Mary Hayes. They had one daughter, Ella. Mr. Skuse has a farm of about 155 acres upon which he has lived for the past twenty nine years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Dr. Charles B. Slocum, Geneva, was born in Galway, Saratoga county, October 6, 1857, moving with his parents to Niagara Falls, where he was educated in the public and High schools, completing his studies in the Grammar School at Lundy's Lane, Drummondville, Canada, and also at Dev aux College, Niagara Falls. He then followed the dry goods business with his father until 1880. Next he began to study dentistry under the tutorship of the late Dr. W. F. Eddington, D.D. S., where he remained a year. He then entered the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, under the tutorship of Prof. James U. Harris, graduating in 1882. Returning to Geneva he entered into partnership with Dr. Stillman, where he remained until the death of Dr. Eddington, when he took possession of his office, and has since conducted the business on his own account, with much success. August 29, 1883, he married Helen M., daughter of Hugh Dennison of Geneva, and they have two sons: John Newton and Hugh Dennison.  Dr. Slocum is a member of the Seventh District Dental Society; an alumnus of Baltimore College of Dentistry; also of the University of Maryland. His father, John N., was born in Northampton, Fulton county, October 7, 1832, and at the age of 18 years he went to Geneseo, remaining four years; thence to Milton, Saratoga county, remaining two years, and May 27, 1856, to Galway. He married Elizabeth B., daughter of Thomas and Ann (Demming) White house, of Top sham, Me., and they had four children: Caroline A. died aged 3 years; Frank E., a dentist of Buffalo; and Ida M., who resides at home. Mr. Slocum was supervisor of Galway three years, leaving that town for Niagara Falls in 1864. In 1875 he came to Geneva, and in 1889 moved to Beaver Falls where he is engaged in the manufacture of wood pulp and pulp board. The family is of English descent, closely related to Major-General Slocum, formerly colonel of the famous 27th Inf. N. Y. Vols.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Barzillai Slosson was active in business and public affairs for many years during the middle of the last century. He was one of the old school lawyers and also served as postmaster of Geneva from 1848 to 1852. Mr. Slosson owned and developed the beautiful estate in the southern section of the city long called the Slosson farm and later occupied by Dr. H. A. Hart, who married his daughter; by W. L. Herendeen, Dr. U. P. Hedrick, and is now owned by C. C. Lobeck.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John M. Smelzer, Geneva, was born in Lodi, Seneca county, November 7, 1846 and was educated in the public schools, graduating from  Lima Seminary. In early life he was a farmer with his father and afterwards on his own account. He was a merchant in Watkins ten years and after a period of rest became a captain in the service of the Seneca Lake Steam Navigation Company for twelve years. About 1883 he came to Geneva to reside.  In February, 1891, he was elected police justice for the term of four years.  September 23, 1867, he married Nancy A. Halsey of his native place, and they have four children: John H., George P., Lizzie K. and Mary C.  Mr. Smelzer's father, Philip, was born in the north of Ireland and came to the United States when five years old.  He married Matilda Meeker, who was born in New Jersey and rode horseback when a young girl with her parents to this part of the State. They had eleven children, of whom eight grew to maturity: John M., Mary, Jane, Sarah, Helen, Lewis M., Baxter T. and Addie.  Mr. Smelzer is a member of Jefferson Lodge No. 332 of Watkins F. & A.M., also of Watkins Chapter No. 22 Royal Arch Masons. 



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. A. B. Smith was the son of the late Hon. Caleb Smith of Hector who was one of the pioneers of Seneca County, settling there with his parents when a boy. Dr. Smith was educated at Lima and studied his profession in the old Geneva Medical College, from which he graduated in 1844-45. The year following he attended lectures at the School of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and received a post-graduate diploma and settled in Ovid, N. Y. for his first practice. In 1853 Dr. Smith came to Geneva and occupied the old Geneva Hotel as a Hygienic Institute at first in connection with his brother, Dr. Horace Smith. Almost from the first he began making improvements in the building and its surroundings to adapt it more fully to his purposes. These improvements progressed until there was nothing left of the early structure but its frame. For many years Dr. Smith made the Geneva Hygienic Institute his constant study and unflagging care. It was formerly one of the best known institutions of its kind in this section. Dr. Smith was married in 1847 to Jane M. Hughes of Elmira. A niece, Miss Alice S. Reynolds, their foster daughter, married Dr. J. C. Knapp, who was associated with Dr. Smith in conducting the Institute, and when Dr. Smith died in 1894 Dr. Knapp continued its management of the "Water Cure" on his own account. Dr. Knapp himself died December 11, 1909.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Abram S. Smith, Phelps, was born at Waterloo, Seneca county, September 13, 1831, one of seven children of Leonard W. and Mary Ann (Simmons) Smith. His grandfather, William Smith, was one of the early settlers of No. 9, town of Seneca. Abram S. married, November 24, 1858, Catharine S., daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Wiggins) Homan of Phelps, and they have three children: Ada (Mrs. H. R. Warner); Louie M. (Mrs. Frank L. Holbrook), and Leah B. Mr. Smith has lived twenty-three years in the village, engaged in the coal and produce business nearly all that time. He was elected supervisor of the town in 1883 and served for five successive terms.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Albert E. Smith, Canandaigua, was born at his present residence in Canandaigua, November 10, 1841. His grandfather, John, was of the Mohawk Dutch. He came to Canandaigua about 1810, where he spent the balance of his days. He was twice married and had a large family. Jacob, the father of our subject, was one of the second family, born in 1799, and from the time he was twelve years old lived in this town. He married Mittie Jameson in 1825, and they had ten children, of which four are still living: Orson J., a farmer of Illinois; Anna E., wife of George S. Hickox, of Canandaigua; Mittie C., widow of Rev. D. C. Sackett; and Albert E. The latter was educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy, and assisted on the farm until his father's death April 26, 1872, when he became the owner. This is a fine farm of 130 acres, and the residence is one of the oldest in the town, erected by Hugh Jameson in 1812. He married, December 7, 1870, Mary A., daughter of William and Rachael (Miller) Greer. They have four children: Mittie J., preceptress of Webster school; M. Alberts, Emma L., and Ethel M. They are Baptists.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Chapin H. Smith, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, October 22, 1863, a son of Lewis M., a native of Yates county who came to this town about 1860. He has always dealt in grain, wool and hops. He married Antoinette Hawley, a sister of Dr. J A. Hawley of this town, and they had three children: Estella, wife of James Douglas of Manchester; Daley C., a student; and Chapin H.  Mrs. Smith died in May 1879.  The whole life of subject, with the exception of about eight months spent in Texas, has been spent in this town.  He was educated at the Canandaigua Academy, and on leaving school became clerk in Pomeroy Fitch's seed store, with whom he remained three years. April 1, 1880, he engaged with the American Express Co. in their office here, starting as helper and advancing to a clerkship. October 1, 1887, he went to Texarkana, Texas, where he was cashier for the Pacific Express Co., and returned here the following April on account of his health.  He then went as driver for the Adams Express Co., which superseded the United States Co., in 1886.   Mr. Smith was driver but a month and a half when he was appointed agent of the company, and has ever since held that position.  Mr. Smith is a member of the Canandaigua Lodge No. 294 F. & A. M., and of Excelsior Chapter No. 164, a member of Canandaigua Lodge K. of P. No. 145, and of Mutual H. & L. Company.  Mr. Smith married, June 15, 1888, Flora A Cornish of Canandaigua, and they have one child, Stanley McKay.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are attendants of the Baptist church of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles S. Smith, Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, June 19, 1865, a son of John and Eliza A. (Sutherland) Smith. John was born in Canandaigua, March 7, 1831, and has always been a farmer. He married in 1859 Eliza A. Sutherland of this town, and they had five children, of whom Charles S. is the oldest son. Mr. Smith died November 20, 1892. The whole life of our subject has been spent in this town. He was educated in Canandaigua Academy under professors Clarke and Smith, and on leaving school followed farming for a short time. In 1888 he took charge of a flouring mill which he bought in 1890, and still conducts a merchant and custom mill. Mr. Smith married in January, 1888, Cora, daughter of Abel Richmond, of Clifton Springs, and they have one child, Helen E. Mr. Smith is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294, F. & A. M. and of Canandaigua Lodge K. of P., and his family are members of the Methodist church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

D. Waterman Smith, Farmington, was born on the family homestead in Farmington, August 16, 1821. He was educated in the common schools and at Canandaigua Academy and the Friends' Boarding School near Poughkeepsie. Mr. Smith has been a railway conductor for several years. He has been several years with the Elmira, Canandaigua & Niagara Falls Railroad Company. The above company becoming extinct, he entered the employ of the N.Y.C. & H.R.R. Co., serving as conductor five years, and is now retired. April 13, 1847, he married Lydia Carey of Half Moon, Saratoga county, and they had six children, two sons and four daughters. Three survive: Fannie E., who married Ransom B. True of Syracuse; David C. and James H., who now live at home.  Mr. Smith's father, David, was born in Rhode Island, April 10, 1774 and came with his parents to this town when about sixteen years old. December 6,  1812, he married Mary Shotwell of this town and they had six children: David P., Rebecca T., D. Waterman, John H., Rhoda M. and Isaac B., of whom three survive: Rebecca Lapham, D. Waterman and Isaac B., a resident of Canandaigua. Mr. Smith's father held a captain's commission in the War of 1812, the commission now being in the possession of the family. His grandfather, Joseph Smith, came to Farmington in an early day and his sons operated a grist-mill.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

E. W. Smith, Manchester, was born in Manchester, May 4, 1866. He received a liberal education in the schools of this town and Canandaigua Academy, and shortly after completing his studies became engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Smith married Catharine Abensheme, and they have one son. E. W. Smith is a staunch Republican, and has served as clerk of the school district, pathmaster, etc. He is an energetic and representative man. His ancestors participated in both the War of Revolution and that of 1812.

From an unknown source:

Edmund W. Smith
, of Manchester - one of the practical, progressive and enterprising agriculturists of the section in which he resides - is a representative of a family that has been noted for their patriotism and love of country; members thereof having participated in the revolutionary war and the war of 1812. Edmund W. Smith was born in Manchester, New York, May 4, 1866.  He received a liberal education in the schools of his native town, and this was supplemented by attendance at the Canandaigua Academy.  Shortly after completing his studies, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits in which he has since engaged, achieving a large degree of success owing to his advanced methods; and his land and buildings all bespeak excellent management and care.  He gives his political allegiance to the candidates of the Republican party, and has served in the capacity of clerk of school district, supervisor and other offices.  Mr. Smith married Catherine Absensheme and they are the parents of one son.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edward Smith, Geneva, was born near Canterbury, County Kent, England, March 18, 1822. He attended for a short time, their National school and came to the United States with his brother, Thomas, when fifteen years old.  At the age of twenty-one, he went back to England and returned with his mother, two brothers and two sisters, to America. The brothers, after some time, embarked in the nursery business with much success. After twenty-one years, Edward withdrew from the original concern and went into business with his sons, Charles E., and Nelson C., conducting a nursery and fruit business, having several large orchards and vineyards at Geneva, also in the town of Ovid, Seneca county, and the town of Hector, Schuyler county, lying along the east shore of Seneca Lake. In 1854, Edward married Adelaide, oldest daughter of George and Mary Catchpole, of Geneva, and they had five sons and five daughters: Franklin R., Edward L., Mary E., Charles E., Nelson C., Martha A. Annie A., William A. and Gertrude and Gracie (twins). Four died: Edward L., Gertrude, Gracie and Martha A.  Franklin married Iola J. Rider, and has three children: Edna M., Leon R. and Harold F. Nelson C., married Mary C. Dove of Geneva. Mrs. Smith died August 19, 1889.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edward Smith, Manchester, was born in Manchester, December 12, 1825. His ancestors were from Connecticut and they participated in the War of 1812 and the Revolution.  In 1852, Mr. Smith purchased his fine property, which he has since been improving and adding to, until now it is a very valuable farm. His wife was Alice E. Harmon and they have two sons. Mr. Smith has held the offices of constable, pathmaster, etc., and is a man of more than ordinary ability and integrity. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Franklin D. Smith, Phelps, was born in Manchester, September 22, 1829, a son of Asa and Hannah (Poor) Smith. The father was born in Vermont near Mount Mansfield, and the mother near Haverhill, N. H. The ancestors on both sides were soldiers in the Revolutionary army, and were at the battle of Bunker Hill. Franklin D. Smith married, February 1, 1865, Mary Wilson of New Jersey, she being one of two children of Peter and Susan Lambertson. Samuel Lambertson, her ancestor, served as a soldier for seven years during the Revolutionary War. He subsequently drew his land in Virginia and was killed by an Indian while at work on his land. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have five children: Edmund W., George F., Aldren R., Mary E., and Lura L. Smith. Mr. Smith owns two farms, one of 155 acres in Manchester, and the home farm in Phelps of 225 acres, which he has owned since 1878. It is one of the notable places of the town, the buildings having been erected by Mr. Smith at a cost of nearly $10,000.



From the 1911 History of Ontario County, NY, Volume II;

George Franklin Smith is a worthy representative of ancestors, on both the paternal and maternal sides who were willing to sacrifice their lives if necessary in defense of their country’s rights, serving in the revolutionary army and participating in the battle of Bunker Hill and other engagements. Asa Smith, grandfather of George Franklin, was born in the vicinity of Mansfield, Vermont, from whence he removed in later life to New York state and there passed the remainder of his days.  He performed well his part in all affairs pertaining to the community, and his influence for good was felt and appreciated.  He married Hannah Poor, who was born near Haverhill, New Hampshire, and among their children was Franklin D. Franklin D., son of Asa and Hannah (Poor) Smith, was born in Manchester, New York, September 22, 1829.  He received the education afforded by the schools of that day, after which he devoted his attention to farming, cultivating his acres in such a manner that they yielded an abundant harvest, thus bringing him in return a comfortable livelihood.  He performed the duties entrusted to him in a satisfactory manner, and ranked among the substantial men of that section of the state.  He married, February 1, 1865, Mary Wilson, daughter of Peter and Susan (Lambertson) Wilson, and a descendant of Samuel Lambertson, who served as a soldier for seven years during the revolutionary war, and subsequently drew land in Virginia, but was killed by an Indian while cultivating the same.  Children of Mr. and Mrs. Smith: Edmund W., George Franklin, Alden R., Mary E., Lura L., and a child who died in infancy. George Franklin, second son of Franklin D, and Mary (Wilson) Smith, was born at Manchester, New York, August 4, 1867.  He attended the schools in the neighborhood of his home, acquiring a practical education. Being reared on a farm, he naturally chose that line of work for his active career, and has continued to the present time, success crowning his efforts as the result of diligence, perseverance and progressive methods.  He is a staunch adherent of the principles of the Republicanism, but has never aspired to public office, preferring to devote his entire energy to the cultivation and improvement of his broad acres.  Mr. Smith is unmarried. Edmund Smith, son of Asa and Hannah (Poor) Smith, was born in the town of Manchester, New York, December 12, 1825, and was educated there in the public schools.  He went west when a young man and was in Michigan three years.  He left there in 1849 to cross the plains when gold was discovered in California, and was successful in gold mining.  After two years in the gold fields, however, he returned to his native place and bought a large farm in partnership with his brother Franklin, whose interests he bought two years afterward.  Here he has followed farming ever since.  His experience in California was fraught with hardship and danger.  The mines where he located at Butte Creek were in an Indian country.  On his return trip he had a narrow escape from drowning.  The vessel in which he sailed from San Francisco sprang a leak soon after leaving port and all the passengers were called to help the crew at the pumps.  Soon after landing at Panama the passengers saw the vessel sink.   In politics he is a Democrat, in religion a Methodist.  He married Alice E., daughter of Harvey and Eunice Harmon.  Children: George E., Asa, Irwin.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Isaac B. Smith, Canandaigua, was born in Farmington in 1831, a son of David Smith, a farmer of that town. The grandfather, Joseph Smith, was one of the first settlers of this county, and reared a family of children on the farm he settled. David Smith had five children, of whom I. B. was the youngest. Three of these are still living: D. Waterman Smith, who lives on the old homestead, and Mrs. Wm. G. Lapham, widow of the late W. G. Lapham, well-known as the assistant superintendent of the N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R.  Isaac B. was educated at Macedon and Canandaigua Academies, also at a school in Dutchess county, where he spent a year and a half.  On reaching his majority he went as clerk in the Penn Yan post office, and afterwards was on the Elmira and Niagara Falls Railroad. December 1, 1858, he severed his connection with this road and entered the store of Marvin Beeman for one month, and January 1, 1859, he bought out the store, which he has ever since conducted, occupying the same store he bought in 1859, and carrying a similar line of goods. Mr. Smith has always conducted a very successful business, to which he gives close attention and strict integrity. His store is located at the corner of Main and Beeman streets. He carries a full line of crockery, glass and chinaware, wall paper, window shades, etc. Mr. Smith married in 1862 Rebecca S. Avery of Fredonia, and they have three sons and one daughter: J. Stanley, of the N. Y. C. ticket office; Frank Avery, a law student with Wyncoop & Rice; George Gray, a clerk in the store, and Josephine L., who is at home. The oldest child, Alice Gray Smith, died August 23, 1868, in her sixth year.  Mr. Smith is a member of the Board of Education and is a Democrat.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Joseph Smith, Geneva, was born in Shaftsbury, Bennington county, Vt., May 1, 1835. He was educated in the common schools across the line in this State, and is a farmer. He came to Western New York in 1859, and on November 6, 1863, he married Jenette A. Eldred of White Creek, Washington county. Mr. Smith's father, Jeremiah, was also born in White Creek, March 6, 1799, and died July 9, 1867. He married Anna Burnett of Shaftsbury, Vt., born November 22, 1799, died January 24, 1879. They had eight children as follows: Hiram, Harvey, Benjamin, Joseph, Martin, Olive, Sophia and Julia. Mr. Smith's grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war.  Mrs. Smith's father, Hiram Eldred, was born in Petersburg, Rensselaer county, August 20, 1807. He married Harriet Goodnough, and they had ten children: Jenette, Jane, Lucia, Harriet, Andrew, George, Alva, Juliet, Albert and Alice.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

J. Stanley Smith, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua about twenty-six years ago. He was educated in the academy under Prof. Clarke, and after leaving school was for about four years in his father's store.  He spent two years as purser, one year with the Canandaigua Lake Steamboat Company, and one year with the People's Line. January 1, 1891, he engaged with the N. Y. C. R. R. Company as cashier in the freight department till October 1, and then became assistant ticket agent, which position he still fills. He was appointed in January, 1892, to the position of secretary to the Canandaigua Board of Education, and about the same time he was appointed by the village council to the position of village clerk. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 245 K. of  P., and Canandaigua Lodge No. 294 F. & A. M.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lewis B. Smith, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell in February 1865, a son of D. H. Smith who was born at Palmyra, June 25, 1835. He is a son of Cyrus, whose father, John, came from Maine in 1812 and settled in Hopewell. His wife was Sarah Smith, by whom he had five sons and three daughters. Cyrus was born in Maine in 1796 and came to Hopewell with his parents. He married Julia, daughter of Daniel Gates and they reared a large family. He was a Republican and was a justice of the peace in Hopewell. He died in 1868 and his wife in 1881. D. G. Smith, was educated in the Palmyra Union School and worked at the trade of carpenter for some time; also in a hub factory for sixteen years, at Flint Creek. He is a Republican and has been assessor three years. He has also been postmaster at Hopewell for fifteen years. March 2, 1859, he married Charlotte A. Lewis, born in 1834, a daughter of Nathaniel B. Lewis.  Mr. Smith and wife have two children, Lewis B., and Katie G., who was born July 30 ,1873 and was educated in the Union School at Canandaigua. Lewis B., was reared on a farm and educated in the common school and Canandaigua Academy. He has been a farmer but the last four years, has had a position on the N. C. R. R. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Llewellyn L. Smith, Canandaigua, was born in Aurelius, Cayuga county in 1838. In 1867 he and his brother, Lucas, came to Ontario county where they located in Middleville, and conducted a merchant and custom mill there seven years, when he returned to Auburn and remained there five years, and then went to Waterloo, where he ran a flouring mill for a year and a half. From Waterloo in 1881 he came to Canandaigua, where in company with his brother, Lucas, they bought the Canandaigua steam mills formerly owned by Abel Richmond and Lucas Smith. They have since conducted a very successful business under the firm name of Smith Brothers & Co., the company being J. W. Priest of Canandaigua. They are the leading merchant and custom millers of this county and the mill has a capacity of about 150 barrels per day.  The greater part of the production is sold in Boston by H. O. Fairbanks.  Mr. Smith married in 1857, Juliette, daughter of Jacob Price of Canada.  Mrs. Smith died October 27, 1892. They were the parents of one son, Llewellyn, a miller in his father's mill.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mack S. Smith, Canandaigua, was born in Farmington, August 14, 1854, a son of Lindley W., a prominent farmer of that town who was elected several terms to the office of justice of sessions. Lindley W. Smith was a civil engineer and surveyor, which he followed in connection with is farm duties until 1862. In 1863 he relinquished farming and was appointed to a position in the Pension Department at Washington, which he filled for five years. He died at Chapinville, March 8, 1878. His wife was Caroline E. Spaulding, who died March 19, 1887. They had four children, of whom, Mack S. is the sole survivor. The boyhood of Mack S. Smith was spent on the homestead farm. When he was twelve years of age, his parents moved to the village of Canandaigua, where he was educated in the Canandaigua Academy, and at the age of nineteen, he was engaged as clerk in the First National Bank of Canandaigua, with which he remained for six and one-half years, then bought out the bookstore of Ira D. Durgy, which he conducted about eight months, but was obliged to give that business up on account of failing health. In October 1882, he engaged with McKechnie & Company, bankers, as teller. He has ever since been located in this bank. In 1884 he was appointed assistant cashier and after the death of Mr. Denbow, which occurred February 6, 1890, he was appointed cashier, and has ever since filled that position. Mr. Smith married January 1, 1885, Nettie Roberts of Phelps.



From the 1911 History of Ontario County, NY, Volume II;

Mack S. Smith, of Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York, a citizen whose integrity is widely recognized and whose capacity and executive ability have been shown in positions of public and private trust, is the son of Lindley W. and Caroline E. (Spalding) Smith, the former of whom was a well known resident of Ontario county, New York, who died at Chapinville, March 8, 1878, and the latter died at Canandaigua, New York, March 19, 1887. Mack S. Smith was born in the town of Farmington, Ontario county, New York, August 14, 1854.  He was educated in the Canandaigua Academy, and about a year and a half after finishing his studies there, he obtained employment in the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company’s freight office at Canandaigua and for nearly two years filled the positions of billing clerk and cashier.  Resigning this position he accepted employment with the First National Bank of Canandaigua and remained with this bank for nearly seven years, after which he was engaged in the book and stationery business for a short period.  In October, 1882, he entered the employ of McKechnie & Company, bankers, upon their organization, serving as a teller.  In 1884 he was appointed assistant cashier.  Upon the death of Mr. Alfred Denbow, in February, 1900, he was appointed cashier and continued in this capacity until March 1, 1899, when the institution went into voluntary liquidation, after the death of its last surviving partner, and was succeeded by the McKechnie Bank, a state Institution.  During the open seasons of 1901-1904, he was at Nome, Alaska, attending to extensive mining interests in which he and his friends were interested. In January 1894, he was nominated and elected to membership at the village board of trustees, and by his associates in that body was called upon to officiate as president of the village.  During his term in that office and largely at his initiative, the agitation for a new municipal water supply system was brought to a consummation, and he resigned from the village board early in 1895 to become a member of the commission appointed to carry out the decision of the citizens to build and place in operation such a plant.  The duty was performed during that year in a manner that reflected the highest credit upon him and his associates.  In 1905, as a result of an open competitive examination, Mr. Smith attained first position on an eligible list of candidates for the position of state bank examiner and received an appointment to that position in which he has since served in a most acceptable manner.  More recently his time has been principally occupied in the management of the large estate of the late Amory Houghton Jr., of Corning, New York.  Mr. Smith married, January 1, 1885, Nettie Roberts, of Phelps, Ontario County, New York.



From the 1911 History of Ontario County, NY, Volume II;

Martin Smith, son of Asa Smith, was born in Ormstown, Canada, March 23, 1808 and came with his parents when he was a small boy to Manchester, Ontario County, New York. He was the eldest of fourteen children of whom Edmund, Frederick, Rufus and Elvira of Manchester; and  Franklin D. Smith of Phelps, are living. Martin Smith was a farmer at Manchester. He married Welthea Wells, born at Penfield, Monroe County, New York, July 15, 1810, and came here with her parents to Manchester when she was about four years old. Her sister, Jane, married Jonathan Fisk; and Delia married Alanson Fisk; both of Arcadia, Wayne County, New York. Her father, Peter Wells, was born and brought up in Farmington, New York, where his father settled soon after the revolution, coming thither from Massachusetts. Her mother, Clarissa McLouth Wells, was born in Farmington, July 5, 1784.  She was left a widow at the age of twenty-eight years and had three young children. She resolutely undertook to support herself and children, taking charge of a farm of one hundred acres and conducting it successfully. She lived on her farm to the time of her death at the advanced aged of eighty years. This farm is near Port Gibson and is now owned by Judson Throop. Her father, Lawrence McLouth, was highly-educated and spoke several languages.  She was the eldest of a large family.  Her grandchildren remember with pleasure the anecdotes of her youth and the story of her plucky life after the death of her husband. She used to tell how on a cold winter evening the children saw what they thought was a colt looking in the window, but it proved to be a wolf. Children of Martin Smith: Peter, born June 5, 1833, died March 23, 1835; Clarrissa, June 3, 1837, died May 26, 1905; Fidelia, October 15, 1838, died July 2, 1869; William, October 5, 1840, died June 12, 1842; Mary J., August 7, 1842, now a resident of Michigan; Margaret, August 5, 1845, died June 3, 1846; Emma, June 3, 1849, now of Michigan; Isaac N. May 19, 1851, mentioned below; Lewis, June 20, 1853, died February 17, 1862. Isaac Newton, son of Martin Smith, was born in Manchester, May 19, 1851.  He attended the district schools until eighteen years of age, when he spent two winters at the Marion Collegiate Institute in Marion, Wayne County, New York. He then taught school in winter and followed farming in summer for four years. In 1878 he bought a farm in what is now the village of Manchester where he now resides. In 1892 the Lehigh Valley railroad yards were located here and the round house and coal pockets are on a part of his farm, taken for the purpose. At this time he built a steam saw mill and conducted it until it was destroyed by fire, ten years later.He immediately rebuilt the mill, however, and installed improved machinery, and has continued in business successfully to the present time. In politics he is a Prohibitionist, in religion a Baptist. He married, December 31, 1873 to Adah Harriet Buck, of Hudson, Michigan, born April 13, 1852, daughter of George and Harriet (Smith) Buck.  Children: Edgar Newton, born October 27, 1874, died January 8, 1888; Luman Lewis, April 6, 1878, died November 15, 1910, married Estella P. Haner, resided in Manchester Village.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Nicholas B. Smith, Geneva, son of Cornelius, was born near Waterloo, October 29, 1835. In 1867 he married  Alice E. Evered, and they have one child, Grace.  For many years  Mr. Smith was engaged in boating on the Erie canal and the Hudson and for three years ran from New York to Baltimore. He has held the office of constable twelve years and sheriff eight years.  In 1861 he enlisted in Company F,  N. Y. Vol. Engineers, and was honorably discharged in 1863. He was injured by a horse falling on him at Malvern Hill. He was in the U. S. Signal Service fifteen months, and was government watchman at Giesboro' Point one year. In 1889 he built a greenhouse at Geneva, and is engaged in the growing of plants. John Evered was born in Suffolk county, England, in 1806.  He married  Sarah Huke, and in 1850 they came to America and settled in Geneva. He was a machinist, and they had eight children.  Mr. Evered died July 1, 1872, and his wife September 11, 1873. Of their children five are now living:  Mary, wife of  George Taylor; Rachel, wife of  John Kenfield; Alice, wife of  N. B. Smith; Eleanor,  widow of E. Wintzer, and all reside in Geneva. Charles lives in Montgomery City, Mo.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rufus V. Smith, Manchester, is a son of Asa, who settled in this town about 1813.  The family originally located in New England, from which vicinity they moved to this State. His great-grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier and was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill. Asa Smith, father of the subject, died in 1868, and his mother in 1884.  Rufus V. Smith was born May 3, 1839, and has never married.  He owns a fine farm of 112 acres, located on the Port Gibson and Canandaigua road, upon which he lives.  Mr. Smith is a staunch Republican and has held several town offices.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Solomon E. Smith, Geneva, of the J. W. Smith Dry Goods Co., was born in Geneva, N. Y., November 5, 1826. His parents were John Smith, Jr., and Rachel (Williams) Smith, both born in Gloucester, Mass. They moved to Geneva about 1824.  Their children were: Elizabeth, who died in 1848; Rachel, now Mrs. J. Pierson, of Stanton, Mich.; John W., who died December 2, 1878; and Solomon. Mr. Smith has always lived in Geneva. He engaged as clerk in the dry goods business with H. G. Hughes in 1840, and remained with him until about 1847. The business of Hughes was then succeeded by S. S. Cobb and J. W. Smith under the firm name of Cobb & Smith. Three years later, about 1850, the latter firm was succeeded by J. W. and S. E. Smith, under the firm name of J. W Smith & Co. As stated above, J. W. Smith died in 1878, but the firm name was continued as J. W. Smith & Co. until July 1, 1892, at which time a stock company was formed with S. E. Smith as president, Wm. Whitwell as secretary and treasurer, and L. Canfield, E. S. Spendlove and Joseph Wagner, directors, and now known the J. W. Smith Dry Goods Co.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Theodore James Smith was born in Geneva, June 28, 1862, the son of Thomas and Susan Smith. He attended the public schools in Geneva and entered Hobart College from which he received the degree of B. A. in 1884 and that of M. A. in 1887. After graduating in 1884 he read law in the office of Mason and Rose for a short time, but in the fall of 1884 he decided to enter the nursery business of his father and uncle, W. & T. Smith. With this business he has ever since been connected and for many years he has been its president. For one term he was president of the American Association of Nurserymen as well as president of two other affiliated nurseries. In 1896-7 he was one of the board of Water Commissioners appointed to take over for the village of Geneva the privately owned water system. After Geneva became a city he was made a member of the first Board of Public Works, serving from 1898 to 1902. For several years he was secretary of the Phillips and Clark Stove Company and later the president of the Andes Range and Furnace Company. He is now chairman of the board of this corporation. Since the incorporation of the Geneva Trust Company he has been a vice president and member of the board of directors. For several years he was a director of the National Bank of Geneva. He was also one of the original incorporators and a trustee of the Geneva Savings Bank, of which he was president for several years, being now the chairman of the executive committee. He was formerly president of the Geneva Optical Company and afterwards president of the Standard Optical Company. For many years he has been a vestryman of Trinity Church, of which he is now Warden, and he is a member of the standing committee of the new Episcopal Diocese of Rochester. He is also a trustee of Hobart College.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thomas Smith, Geneva, was born in Kent County, England in 1820, and in 1837 came to America and located in Geneva, where he bought twenty-five acres of land and carried on market gardening. In 1846, he with his brothers, established their nurseries, commencing in a small way, and now has the largest nurseries in the county. He has 600 acres of land, and over 250 is devoted to the nursery business. His brothers, William and Edward, were associated with him. In 1863 Edward retired. Mr. Smith is also a member of several other firms: The T. Smith & Co. Bending Works, is president of the Geneva Optical Co., president of the Geneva Accident Insurance Co., also president of the Baltimore Retort and Fire Brick Co. of Baltimore.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Virgil Smith, Gorham, is a native of Gorham, born February 7, 1839. His father, Nathaniel, was a son of Enos and Phoebe Smith, natives of Orange county, N. Y.  March 4, 1819, Nathaniel  married Mary T. Yeckley, born May 17, 1796, and a daughter of John and Esther Yeckley. Mr. Smith and wife had four sons and four daughters. In 1820 he came to Gorham and settled on a farm of 160 acres, and there spent the remainder of his days. He was one of the organizers and also president of the Gorham Agricultural Society.  Mrs. Smith died in 1868, aged 72 years. Mr. Smith married second, Rachel Hood, July 21, 1868.  Mr. Smith died August 25 1886, aged ninety-three years. Virgil Smith married December 5, 1865, Fanny Mitchel, a native of New Jersey, born July 26, 1844. She is a daughter of Henry C., a son of John Mitchel, a native of New Jersey. In 1864, Henry C., came to Gorham, where he at present resides. His wife died in 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have had two children: Mary, wife of Dales Frankish and Albert M., born April 27, 1870. The latter married January 10, 1893, Ella M. Shaw of Gorham.  Subject is a carpenter by trade, and has followed that business for twenty years. He is a Democrat, and has been trustee, justice of the peace and treasurer of Gorham Agricultural Society three years.  He is a member of the Canandaigua Lodge No. 236 I.O.O.F.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William H. Smith, Canandaigua, was born in the town of Farmington, Ontario County, January 23, 1829. He was a son of George Smith, a farmer of that town. His boyhood was passed in his native town, where he attend the common schools and later the academies at Macedon and Canandaigua. When he was nineteen years old he began the study of law in the office of Judge Mark H. Sibley, and was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1851. He began practice in Port Jervis, Orange county, where he remained a year and a half, and then settled in Canandaigua, where he has ever since followed his profession. In 1858 he was elected district attorney and re-elected in 1861. While serving his second term he was a delegate to the National Convention at Baltimore, which nominated President Lincoln for his second term. In January 1869, he was elected for four years as county judge and in 1878 was re-elected for six years. While serving as district attorney several cases of great importance came under his official control, and in their successful management he won the commendation of the profession and the community. Mr. Smith was married in 1851 to Jane Halstead, daughter of Isaac Halstead of Livingston county, and they have three children: Emma, wife of Frank G. Stark, living in Wisconsin; Harriet B. and Halstead. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Youngs W. Smith, Bristol, was born in Hopewell, March 20, 1839, one of the seventh generation of this family in America, the first being Rev. John Smith, a son of John, who, tradition say, was a son of Captain John Smith of Pocahontas fame. Rev. John Smith was the oldest of seven sons, and was born in Milford, England, June 18, 1664, and settled in Milford, Conn., named by him after his home in England. Here he lived and died. Dr. Ebenezer, his son, was born in Milford, England, in 1682, and died in 1744. Dr. Ebenezer Smith 2d was born March 2, 1719, and died September 9, 1796. Dr. Ebenezer Smith 3d was born October 3, 1761, and died April 3, 1844. His wife was Elizabeth Bostwick, born March 19, 1770, died June 1, 1849.  They had nine children. Rev. Benjamin B. Smith was born in Milford, Conn., February 3, 1792. He studied medicine, but soon gave up its practice and took a theological course at Yale College. He was ordained a minister of the Congregational church by the Rev. Lyman Beecher, father of Henry Ward Beecher. He married Colisla Terrell, born in Milford, Conn., April 15, 1795, a daughter of Judge Terrell of Milford, Conn., and they had three sons and three daughters. His wife died June 30, 1830, and he married second Martha Babbitt of Pultney, born March 3, 1861, died February 3, 1836. They had two sons. Dr. Smith married third, to Maria G. Vincent of Bristol, born June 17, 1799, died November 1, 1862. She was a daughter of Dr. Thomas Vincent, son of Absalom Vincent of Orient, born in 1742, died in 1786, who married Hannah Youngs, daughter of Judge Thomas Youngs, and they had four sons and two daughters. Dr. Thomas Vincent was born in Orient, L. I., in 1753. His father died when he was thirteen years of age, and he was reared by Judge Thomas Youngs of Orient.  He studied medicine and went to Caldwell, N. J., to practice his profession, and there married Johanna, daughter of Ebenezer Grover. Dr. Ebenezer Smith and third wife had three children: Maria V., born April 7, 1837, at Pultney, who married Chauncey O. Taylor, a farmer of Bristol, and they have an adopted daughter, the wife of H. W. Sears of Bristol; Youngs W. and Quincy A., born in Bristol, March 26, 1843. He owns a farm of 114 acres.  Quincy Smith married, January 28, 1874, Florence Rood of Ellicottville, N. Y., and they have one daughter, Guernie. Youngs W. Smith, the subject of this sketch, was reared on a farm and educated in East Bloomfield Academy and Iron City Commercial College of Pittsburg, Pa. He engaged in farming, and since 1867 has made a specialty of hop growing, starting with five acres, and to-day is second largest grower in New York, having 115 acres. He has also been an extensive hop dealer, and was a member of the firm of Youngs W. Smith & Company, Pearl street, New York. Mr. Smith is one of the largest farmers of the town, having 400 acres in Bristol Valley. He was a Democrat until 1892, since which time he has been identified with the People's Party. He was supervisor in 1888, and was nominated by the Democratic party for member of assembly in 1888, but the county being Republican, he was defeated. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge, No. 294, F. & A. M., also is a member of the Farmers' Alliance. He and family attend the Congregational church of Bristol. November 19, 1867, Mr. Smith married Amelia Lee, born September 27, 1843, in Bristol, a daughter of Lester P. Lee, a son of Benjamin, an early settler of Ontario county. Mr. Smith and wife have one child, Lee B., who was educated in Canandaigua and East Bloomfield Academies, and is a graduate of Rochester Business University, and assists his father on the farm.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edward Smyth, South Bristol, is the oldest son of Thomas Smyth, who came from County Down, Ireland, in 1848, and settled in Richmond, Ontario county, where he remained about six years, then removed to South Bristol and engaged in farming and hop growing. He married in 1847 Mary Foy of County Down, and they had ten children. He died May 28, 1878, survived by his wife and children. Edward Smyth was born in Richmond, January 11, 1849, and removed to South Bristol with his parents when about six years of age. He was reared on the farm and educated at the district school and Canandaigua Academy. He married, July 3, 1873, Mary Jane, daughter of Robert Murray of Canandaigua, and they have four children: Lewis R., born February 10, 1875; Thomas J., born March 1, 1878; Gertrude T., born October 15, 1883; and Mabel E., born September 10, 1890. His wife died May 9, 1891. Mr. Smith has been assessor of South Bristol nine years and supervisor in 1890-91 and ' 92, and holds the office at present, 1893. He was also a delegate to the State Convention in 1892 to nominate a candidate for president. He is one of the leading farmers of the town, and is engaged in general farming and hop growing.



Back to Biographies



Return to the Ontario County GenWeb Homepage

                Copyright © 2008, Ontario County NYGenWeb and each contributor and author of materials herein. All rights reserved
091807

Updated 31 January 2008