"Ri" to "Rz" Family Sketches




From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

C. Willard Rice, local attorney, is a member of one of the older families of the State of New York. The Rice farm in the Town of Seneca has remained in the family for one hundred and forty years. It was taken up directly from Phelps and Gorham by the great-great-grandfather of C. Willard Rice. Mr. Rice was the only son of Edward H. and Lucy (Dixon) Rice and was born in the town of Seneca, June 2, 1872. He attended the Canandaigua Academy and later graduated from Hamilton College. For a number of years he was engaged in teaching and served as supervisor of schools at Seneca Falls for a period of six years. He was admitted to the Bar in 1907 and immediately opened office in Geneva where he still continues to practice. He has been on the Board of Alderman, on the Board of Supervisors and for a time was vice-president and cashier of the National Bank of Geneva.



From Phelps Citizen 18 October 1900

Deacon Caleb Rice settled at Orleans and with Jessie Warner was an active promoter of this village. He married Lucy Leland, who died Aug. 30, 1838, aged 80 years. He died Dec. 25, 1836, aged 83 years. Their son, Caleb, became an active citizen of Orleans and was foremost in the establishment and maintenance of the Baptist church. Caleb, Jr., an only son, married three times, and had 11 children: 1. ---------, born 1812; 2. Josephus, born 1814, married Mary Goseline; 3. Betsey, born 1817; 4. Mary Ann, born 1819, married Ulysses Warner. She died in 1843, aged 23 years. John I., born 1821, married Charlotte Scott; 6. Nelson F., born 1824, married Sarah, daughter of Joseph Allen. She died 1848, aged 24 years. 7. Eliphalet, born 1827; 8. Napoleon B., born 1828; 9. Lydia Jane, born 1830; 10. Wealthy, born 1832; and 11. Susan M., born 1834. The three wives of Rev. Caleb Rice, Jr., were: first, Betsy Melvin, who died June 9, 1817, aged 26 years; second, Lydia Lathrop, who died Nov. 2, 1835, aged 38 years; and third, Polly Brockway, the widow of Geo. Brockway. The Rice families were from Conway. They settled in Phelps in 1796. The daughter of Elder Caleb Rice, Sr., were: 1. Mercy, who married Lewis Warner; 2. Hazel, who married Rufus Warner; 3. Susan, who married Washington Moore;  4. Lucinda, who married Oliver Warner; and Lucy, who married William Moore. The son Caleb was the youngest of the family.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Frank Rice, Canandaigua, was born in the town of Seneca, Ontario county, January 15, 1845. His maternal ancestor came to the town of Seneca from England, and his paternal grandfather from Massachusetts, and were among the earliest settlers in that part of the county. Mr. Rice's father, at the time of his death in 1891, owned one of the farms purchased by them. During his early years Mr. Rice worked on the farm summers and attended school winters. When eleven years old he entered the private school of Dr. Taylor at Geneva, where he remained one year. Returning home he remained until he was fifteen, when he spent one year in the Geneva Classical and Union School. He was in the Canandaigua Academy three years under Dr. Noah T. Clarke, and in the fall of 1864 entered Hamilton College, from which he was graduated in 1868. In the following year he began the study of law in the office of Comstock & Bennett at Canandaigua, and there laid the foundation for the legal attainments that afterwards enabled him to rise to a commanding position in his profession.  He began practice in 1870, and in 1875 was elected district attorney and re-elected to the same office in 1878. In 1882 he was nominated by his party for the Assembly and elected by 1,266 majority, reversing a Republican majority of the previous year of 1,223. The Legislature was Democratic that year, and Mr. Rice attained a prominent position among the leaders of his party. He was chosen chairman of the committee on privileges and elections, and also served as a member of the judiciary, insurance, and other committees. His greatest victory was achieved in 1883 when he was renominated for the Assembly, and the opposition nominated a strong candidate and made a special effort to defeat him. In the face of this fact Mr. Rice was re-elected by a majority of 241, while the county went Republican by 692. In that year he was nominated in the Democratic caucus for speaker, but as the Legislature was Republican, he was not, of course, elected; he, however, became the leader of his party on the floor of the House. In 1884 he was elected county judge of Ontario county, being thus honored with the fifth victory in a Republican county. He was serving his fifth year as county judge when he was nominated by his party in Syracuse in 1889 for secretary of state, and elected by more than 20,000 majority over John I. Gilbert, Republican. Mr. Rice was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1880 which nominated General Hancock for the presidency, and served as secretary of the New York delegation. He has also been a delegate to nearly every State convention since that time, and was a member of the Democratic State Committee in 1888. He was a delegate to the State Convention of February, 1892, and a delegate to the National Convention held in Chicago which nominated Grover Cleveland for president in 1892. He has been a candidate for office seven times and was never defeated. The fairness and ability which characterized his work in the office of secretary of state secured for him re-election in 1891 by a majority of 38,173 over Eugene F. O'Connor. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rice, the late Henry O., was born in Washington county, July 6, 1833, and went with his parents to Oswego county when a young man.  August 30, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Forty-seventh N.Y.S. Vols., was honorably discharged April 9, 1863.  December 15, 1863, he married Elizabeth, daughter of George and Diantha Howland of this town, they moved to Farmington where he died May 21, 1879.  Mrs. Rice's father, George Howland, was born in Adams, Mass., January 28, 1791, and came here with his parents when six weeks old.  January 10, 1819, he married Diantha Robinson, who was born October 10, 1795.  Her father was a solider in the Revolutionary war.  They had two children:  Abram, born July 6, 1822, and Elizabeth.  Abram married Phebe Macumber of Farmington and they had two children:  Mary and Lucilla T. Mary married Henry C. Osborne, and Lucilla married Winfield S. Miak.  They have one daughter, Angeline M.  The farm has been owned continuously in the family 102 years.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Joel Rice owned and kept the Mansion House, a popular inn on the south side of Seneca Street.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles A. Richardson, Canandaigua, was born in Freetown, Cortland county, August 14, 1829, a son of Curtis Richardson, a farmer, and a grandson of William Richardson, a soldier in the War of the Revolution from the State of Rhode Island. At the age of twenty he entered the academy at Homer, NY, and completed the course of studies at that school, and after teaching for a short time, he commenced the study of law in the office of S. V. R. Mallory, esq., at Canandaigua and was admitted to the bar in 1856. He then went to Nebraska, but returned in 1860 and entered upon the practice of his profession at this town. In 1862 he assisted in recruiting the One Hundred Twenty-sixth Regiment N. Y. Infantry, a three years regiment, and was commissioned therein successively first lieutenant, captain and major, the latter commission having been issued the 14th of June, 1864, he was not mustered in under it.  He was discharged September 3, 1864, on account of wounds received June 16, 1864, in action in front of Petersburg, Va.  He was with his regiment in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Tolopotomy, Cold Harbor and Petersburg, having been wounded also at Gettysburg. After his discharge from the army he resumed the practice of law, in which he has since continued. Major Richardson held the office of county treasurer, during the most critical period in the financial history of the county for six years, from the first day of January, 1865, during which nearly a million and a half dollars indebtedness was paid, and he was surrogate of the county for six years from the first day of January, 1874. In 1886 he was appointed one of the commissioners of the State of New York to determine the positions and movements of the New York troops engaged on the battlefield of Gettysburg and to erect monuments thereon to the regiments and batteries of this State so engaged. He initiated this patriotic movement in 1885, and procured the endorsement thereof by the veterans of his regiment, by a resolution adopted at their reunion held on the 26th of August of that year at Canandaigua, and also by the veterans of the One Hundred Eleventh N. Y. at Sodus Bay on the following day, and thereupon he drafted the bill which was introduced at the next session of the Legislature by Senator Raines, and which became a law, whereby Major-General Daniel E. Sickles, Major-General Henry W. Slocum, Major-General Joseph B. Carr, Major Richardson and Adjutant-General Josiah Porter were appointed commissioners to carry into effect that act. Major Richardson, by direction of the commissioners, also drafted the act of 1887, specifying the monuments to be erected by the commissioners and prescribing their duties relating thereto. The work of the commissioners on the battlefield was completed and the monuments dedicated with appropriate ceremonies in July, 1893. Too much praise cannot be given Major Richardson for his active interest in this matter.  Major Richardson has also been connected officially with many local enterprises. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Silas Richardson, Victor, was born on the farm on which he now lives, August 15, 1805, was educated in the district school which his grandfather helped build, has always been a farmer and to this day does all the garden work. He married twice, first, December 18, 1826, Hannah Snediker of this town, and had two children: Charles S., who has been dead about 38 years, and Mary, who married Stephen Lombart, and resides in Michigan.  Mrs. Richardson died October 23, 1853, and he married second, on September 20, 1854, Adeline Ladd, and they had three children: Jeremiah C., who died in 1876; Elias L., born May 31, 1863. He was educated in the public schools and Fort Plain Academy, and was a farmer having charge of the homestead farm.  June 23, 1887, he married Carrie E., daughter of Andrew and Gertrude Ketchum of Perrington, they have one son, Howard S. John M. was born September 16, 1866, was educated in the public schools, and is treasurer of the Electric Motor Manufacturing Company in Chicago, IL. March 8, 1889, he married Kate M. Minor of Canandaigua, and they have one daughter, Lina C.  Mr. Richardson's father, Jeremiah, was born in Hartland, Vt., May 10, 1778, and married Sally Seymour of the State of Connecticut.  She was born November 25, 1789, and came to Mayfield, now Fulton county. His grandfather, Thomas, came to Victor in the year 1800, and his father, Jeremiah, in the year 1802. His grandfather, Thomas, when at work on his farm in Vermont heard the cannonading on Lake Champlain in the War of 1776, went to his home, took his wife and family to his father, made a small bundle, picked up his rifle and served three years until independence was declared.  His birthday was the 4th of July, and up to the time of his death he invited his friends and celebrated the occasion in a fitting manner. Mr. Richardson's father sold his wheat one year in Canandaigua for twenty-five cents a bushel, at the same time traded eight bushels of wheat for one pound of tea, and when about to build a barn went to Albany and purchased nails for the same at eighteen cents per pound.  Mr. Richardson has been justice of the peace twelve years, and is a member of the Universalist church, and his father was in the War of 1812 at the time Buffalo was burned.



From Geneva Daily Times 13 April 1904

It is ever pleasant to know of the reunion of the families of Phelps. Recently it was of the Ridley family. It is getting to be their habit, and their number compels them to think of Redfield Park or the Grange Hall. This is fine. For twelve years this family have had their annual gathering. It keeps all their members young and unites them in all the best interests. If I mistake not their meeting began in celebrating the wedding anniversary of William Ridley and his good wife, Elizabeth. The families of his brothers and sisters and of his own children and descendants are of themselves numerous enough for a crowd. They celebrated the 65th anniversary of their marriage and were soon to celebrate their 66th when Mr. Ridley was summoned to the Home Immortal. His was a loving and useful life, honored and respected by his townsman.

Matthew Ridley came from North of England in 1807 and settled in Phelps, and was employed by Pierce Granger, and in 1810 purchased a farm of 186 acres in the northern part of Phelps, adjoining Robert Purchase and William Crothers. He married Lydia Daniels, who died in 1812, leaving a son, Elihu, of whom more later, and he was married again in 1814 to Daliva Sober, latterly spelled Soper. They had six children. She died in 1872 and he died in 1865. The name of Matthew Ridley is numerous in County North Cumberland, England. Matthew Ridley was a cousin of Edward Hall, the early settler at Hall's Corners, town of Seneca. Elihu Ridley was born in 1811 and settled in Phelps. He married November, 1852, Betsy, daughter of David Harmon. They had two sons, N. H. and Charles; and daughters, Mrs. Hughson, Mrs. Lake, Mrs. Burleigh and Mrs. Burgdorph. There may have two or three more children. Elihu Ridley died about 1870 and his widow died June 20, 1888, aged 76 years.

James Ridley, born 1815, married Amanda, daughter of William Crothers, and had seven children, He died in 1881. William
Ridley, born January 30, 1817, settled in Arcadia. February 14, 1839, me married at Dansville, Elizabeth Titworth. They had 11 children, most of whom lived to advanced life. Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were numerous. The almost 65 years of married life was crowned with favors and devoted children.

Lydia, born 1822, married first George Daniels, who died 1872; she was married again in 1881 to Joseph Westfall. They resided in Hudson, Mich. She died in 1901, aged 78 years. Hiram Ridley, born 1828, resided on the homestead until 1879, when he sold it to Lyman Crothers and moved to Sturgis, Mich. He married and had five children. Daliva Ridley, born 1832, married in 1852 William Daniels, and had five children. Settled in Arcadia.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry Rigby, Geneva, was born in London, England, in 1840, and at the age of eleven years went to learn the cigar trade, in which he served seven years. In 1869 he came to America and stopped in Syracuse for three or four years. In 1880 he began the manufacture of cigars in Geneva, and in 1866 married Eliza Jones of London. They have had ten children, five of whom are now living. He is a member of St. Peter's Episcopal church, and is a Republican.



From Geneva Daily Times 4 May 1907

Chapinville, N. Y. - A notable visit to a remarkable woman was enjoyed by the pastor and his wife of the Chapinville church last Thursday. In the home of Mrs. Ann C. Riker, on the farm east of the village, where they have lived for more than two score years, we found the oldest lady resident of the town of Hopewell, in good health and spirits with a mind more vigorous than many women of fifty. She related not only incidents of her past life as all old people are pleased to, but talked of present day occurrences with her family and neighbors with the keen interest characteristic of her younger days. A few months ago, your correspondent went to call on her and found her cleaning the cook stove, overhauling it top to bottom to put it in better condition for baking. At this time, she sat at the head of the table and served the tea. The other day she had prepared for her guests, and she frequently does it, so we were told by her youngest daughter, Cora, the most delicious bread and mince pie. In the afternoon, instead of lying down for her accustomed rest, she sewed rug rags and wound quite a ball as well and rapidly as the younger lady working with her. On the 26th of next July, should the Good Providence see fit to spare her life til then, she will be 90 years of age. She has lived a simple, humble, faithful Christian life in the faith of the Quakers of the New England states from which they came to this state about 70 years ago. Rearing a large family, she was unable to indulge her taste for the fine arts, which longing was suppressed for more than three score years. When she became released from the excessive family cares, most naturally she took to the use of the brush, paints and palette and has painted, since her three-score-and-ten, floral designs which now beautify, not only her own home, but the homes of her many friends, as they have been gifts from her skillful, aged hands and great heart. Less than one year ago, she painted with sweet brier roses, a souvenir post card to send to her daughter in Brooklyn. Among other pictures old and new, she showed us the old home of her mother in Somerset, Massachusetts, and gave us to copy for the press an ancient marriage certificate of the Order of Friends when they were united in matrimony by the joining of hands with solemn mutual vows at the monthly meetings, in the absence of clerical ceremony as now required.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry L. Riker, Hopewell, was born in Clinton, January 31, 1814. His father was Henry, a son of Henry, who was a native of Germany and came to this country, first to Long Island and then to Dutchess county. Henry Riker, jr., was born in Clinton in 1774, and married Susan Lyons, a native of Clinton, and daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth Lyons.  By his first wife he had two sons.  She died in 1814, and he married second Lydia Hodge, of Massachusetts, by whom he had four children. He was town collector for many years and died in 1831. Henry L. Riker had a common school education, and has always been a farmer. He married in 1835 Ann C. Thorne, a native of Dutchess county, and they have had four sons and four daughters: Sarah E., George W., Martha A. (deceased), William N., Melville G., Annie L., Cora A. (who resides at home), and Frank T. (deceased). In 1837 they moved to Cayuga county, remaining until 1868. Mr. Riker came to Hopewell and purchased the farm where he now resides. He is a Republican, and he and his wife are members of the Friends Society. The parents of Mrs. Riker were James and Sarah Thorne, of Dutchess county, and Somerset, Mass., respectively.  Mr. and Mrs. Thorne had five children. He named the village of Clinton Hollow and organized the first post-office in 1816, of which he was the first postmaster. He was superintendent of the Clinton schools, and for many years overseer of the poor. Mrs. Thorne died in 1865, and Mr. Thorne August 6, 1872.   



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Melville G. Riker, Hopewell, was born in Cayuga county, June 14, 1844, a son of Henry L. Subject was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools, and has always been a farmer. He is also a real estate dealer. In 1867 he married Sarah L. Cole, a native of Cayuga county, born in 1844. Her parents are Peter and Lavira Cole, natives of Ulster county, and early settlers of Cayuga county, where they now reside, aged respectively eighty-six and eighty-one years.  Mr. Cole and wife have eight children, all of whom are living. The children of Mr. Riker and wife are: Charles M., Carrie A., Wilfred C., and Annie L.  Charles M. is studying mechanical and electrical engineering in Cornell University, and Carrie is in Union school at Canandaigua.  Mr. Riker came to Hopewell in 1869, and in 1884 purchased the Joseph Gates farm.  He is a Republican, and has been assessor three years. Mrs. Riker and her eldest daughter and eldest son are members of the Congregational Church at Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

W. H. Riker, Hopewell, was born in Cato, Cayuga county, August 15, 1839, a son of Henry L. Riker. December 18, 1861, he married Fannie E. Vorce, a native of Conquest, Cayuga county, born June 3, 1842. She is a daughter of Harris and Minerva (Johnson) Vorce, natives of Dutchess county, who reared three children. His first wife was Fannie Spaulding. His father, Daniel Vorce, was a Quaker, and the family is of Holland extraction. Harris Vorce died August 2, 1873, aged 71 years, and his wife died  February 26, 1888, in her 71st year. Mr. Riker and wife have one daughter, Clara B., wife of W. H. Megaffee of Reed's Corners.  They have one daughter, Leontine. Mr. Riker spent two years in gold mining and prospecting in Montana, Idaho, and Utah, and in Salt Lake City during one of their conventions. He returned to Cayuga county and spent two years, also one year in Ontario, and then removed to Iowa, where he engaged in farming and stock dealing. In 1874 he came to Hopewell, and worked his father's farm five years. He then purchased 100 acres in Gorham, and has since bought fifty acres in Hopewell. Mr. Riker is a Republican and has been delegate to State Conventions at Rochester and Albany.  He now resides in his pleasant home in Chapinville.  



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mrs. Elizabeth Ringer, Geneva, is a native of Phelps.  Her late husband's father, William Ringer, was born in the town of Seneca on the farm he now owns, December 28, 1818, and has been a lumber dealer and farmer. October 6, 1846, he married Jane Hogan, formerly of Albany county, and they had these children: George, died in infancy; William H., who married Martha A. Parker; Charles E., who married Elizabeth Fothergill and had two children: Stella M., George E., and James M., who married Annie Willis of Dresden, Yates county.  Chas. E. Ringer died June 3, 1890. William Ringer's father, Solomon, was born in Maryland, October 25, 1789, and came to Geneva in 1805. He married Elizabeth Elyea, born November 24, 1787, and they had five children: John, Anna, William, George W., and Lyman.  Solomon died June 21, 1872, and his wife February 3, 1864. The grandfather, John Ringer, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Riordan, Patrick, West Bloomfield, was born March 15, 1832, in Tipperary, Ireland, and emigrated to America in 1851.  He located in Syracuse, but two years later went to Pittsford where he lived two years.  In 1855 he came to West Bloomfield, where he has since resided.  For three years he worked at farming, then purchased a small farm, and twenty years later sold that and purchased one of 120 acres of Mr. Palmer, formerly owned by Hon. John Dickens.  He owns also another farm south of the village.  In 1857 he married Mary Whiby, of County Tipperary, Ireland.  They have had five children:  Mary, wife of James Curran of this town; John; Ellen, wife of John Murphy of this town; Lizzie, wife of John Newman, of East Avon; and Henry.  Both sons are aiding their father in the carrying on of the farms.  They are of the Catholic faith.  Mrs. Riordan is dead.  Mr. Riordan was appointed census enumerator for this town for the last census.  He is a Democrat.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Hamilton Rippey, was born at Stanley in the town of Seneca, October 4, 1817, and followed farming. November 19, 1843, he married Harriet Dodge of this town, and they had one son, Aaron C., born May 2, 1844. He was educated in the public schools. He is a farmer and has been justice of the peace nearly nine years. March 12, 1868, he married Sarah A. Cameron, of Shawangunk, Ulster county; they have two children: Hattie L. and Lawrence C. Mr. Rippey's father, George, was born in York county, Pa., August 17, 1781, and came to this State about 1808. May 14, 1812, he married Margery Chamberlain, formerly of Cayuga county, N. Y., and they had seven children: John, Hamilton, Mary A., Sarah, George C., Jeremiah C., and Elizabeth M. His father died about 1860, and his mother 1875. Mrs. Rippey's father, William Dodge, was born in Bridgewater in the eastern part of this State in 1787, and married Nancy Barkman. Later they came to Western New York. Their children were: Eleanor E., Harriet N., George W., and Rachel M. Mr. and Mrs. Rippey attend the Presbyterian church at Seneca.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mary A. Rippey, Seneca, the oldest living daughter of George and Margery Rippey, resided with her parents as long as they lived, and now is an honored resident of Stanley. Her mother's father, Ninian Chamberlain, was a native of Adams county, Penn., born October 1, 1751. July 5, 1784, he married Elizabeth Ewing of that State. He was employed as master of transportation in the Revolutionary war, through all the vicissitudes and hardships so nobly borne in the struggle for independence. His brother, James, was a colonel in the war. After the close of the war Ninian resumed farming. In 1807 he moved his family to Cayuga county, where he purchased 325 acres of land from Lucius Elmendorf and succeeded well, but a defective title nearly ruined his temporal prospects, still he was not discouraged. He bought a portion of it back with the aid of his seven sons and his wife, who under all circumstances was a true helpmate. To her assistance, in a great measure, he owed his success, having an abiding trust in God. In his dealings with his fellow-men his integrity was never questioned. He and his wife were honored and upright members of the Reformed church of Owasco village, then a mere hamlet. He died December 20, 1833, aged eighty-two years, and his wife March 15, 1855, aged eighty-seven years. All their children were at his funeral, and all but one (who died) were at their mother's funeral. They reared thirteen children in lives of usefulness, seven sons and six daughters.



From "History of the Pan-handle: being Historical Collections of the Counties of Ohio, Brooke, Marshall and Hancock, West Virginia." Compiled by J. H. Newton, G. G. Nichols, and A. G. Sprankle. Heritage Books, 1879.

REV. WM. E. RIPPEY, pastor of the Wesley M. E. Church, South Wheeling, is a native of Ontario county, New York, and is a son of Wm. Rippey, a farmer of the same section, born in 1793. The Rev. Wm. E., whose family is of Scotch Irish descent, was born in 1837, and after receiving a plain education, entered the University at Parkersburg, where he graduated in 1870. He has since officiated at Middlebourne, Tyler county; Bellville, Wood county, and Knottsville, Taylor county, coming to Wheeling in March, 1877, where he has held his present charge ever since. He was married in 1860, to Elizabeth, second daughter of Gaius Truesdell, farmer, Yates county, New York, and by her has one daughter. Mrs. Rippey's father was of German descent, and her grandfather was one of the first travelers, by foot, to Kentucky and back, from New York state, during pioneer days. [page 268]

Thanks to Martha Magill for this donation.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles F. Robertson, Canandaigua, was born in Geneva, March 30, 1850, a son of John B., a native of Yates county, born in Benton in 1824. The latter early learned the carpenter's trade, and followed contracting and building all his life. He was engaged in building in Canandaigua from 1860 until his death in 1885. He married when a young man Sophia J. Flowers, of Benton Centre, and they were the parents of four children: Martha S., wife of James A. Ellis, of Canandaigua; Mary C., wife of George H. Stannard, of Buffalo; Jane E., of Canandaigua; and Charles F. The early life of our subject was spent in the town of his birth. In 1858 his parents came to Canandaigua, where Charles was educated in the common schools and the academy, and after leaving school took up the trade of his father, which he followed. In 1880 he began to take contracts for building in this town and erected some of the finest residences, conspicuous among them being the residences of Editor Huntington, James S. Cooley, and many others.  Mr. Robertson has always taken an active interest in politics, has been village trustee, and in 1891 was the president of the village. He is a Republican, and was among the first to agitate the subject of having a Union Free School established, and being a member of the board, he followed it until it was made a success. He married in 1877 Alice M. Mather, of Canandaigua. He is a Mason and has represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge as master for two years, and was M. E. H. P. of Excelsior Chapter No. 164 one year.


John Decker Robinson is said to have been the first white settler to Phelps.  The following reference to John Decker Robinson is found in The History of New York State; edited by James Sullivan; Lewis Historical Publishing Co., New York & Chicago, 1927, 2:611:

"John Decker Robinson founded Phelps, Ontario Co., NY on May 14, 1789. Robinson was previously from Eastern NY."

From History of the Pioneer Settlement of Phelps and Gorham's Purchase, and Morris Reserve by O. Turners; published by William Alling, Rochester, 1851. pp 223-224:

John Decker Robinson, from Claverack, Columbia Co., and Nathaniel Sanborn, were among those who came to Genesee county about the time of the Phelps and Gorham treaty . . . . . As soon as land sales commenced, Mr. Robinson bought lot No. 14, T. 11, R. 1 (Phelps) on Canandaigua outlet, in payment for which he erected for Phelps and Gorham, (partly of logs and partly framed) the building that was used as the primitive land office, and for the residence of the agent of Mr. Walker. In the spring of 1789, he put his family and goods on board a batteau at Schenectady, and landed them at their new home in the then wilderness. Nine days after their arrival, they were joined by Pierce and Elihu Granger, Nathaniel Sanborn and his brother-in-law, _____ Gould, who remained with them a few months, and returned to Suffield in the fall, leaving the Robinson family to spend the winter eight miles from their nearest neighbor . . . . His son Harry was the first male child born in Phelps; another son Henry, H. resides in Lima.

Notes from Randy Robinson:

There is more information on Decker Robinson, but this should give you an idea of his life.  He is listed on the 1790, 1800, and 1810 census for Ontario Co.  I don't know that he is my ancestor, but the possibilities look good because of the Gould connection.  We have suspected Gould for some time because of my gg-grandfather's choice of names for his son - Loren Gould Robinson. My ancestor, David, was born 3 Feb 1815 or 1816 (per his obituary) in Gorham, Ontario Co., NY.  We have not been able to find any records there.  My family has always referred to him as David Robinson but his obituary lists him as Daniel (David) Robinson.  David also named a son Henry Orville.  The Orville is probably significant.  It is repeated as a middle name in a later generation.  I also have three generations of Albert being used as a middle name.  Elsewhere I read that Phelps was recorded as the first white settler in Ontario Co.

Also found cemetery records recorded by DAR which list a Robinson.  James (first settler in Phelps); arrived May 14 1789; died June 14, 1858; aged 86 yrs. 4 mo. and 24 days.  Also found an old response to a query in the Boston Transcript, 1931 about John Decker suggesting that he and his wife Lena Shutts had a son Pieter baptized 27 May 1781 in or near Livingston, Columbia Co. NY - Linlithgo Reformed Church. Maybe he had two wives?

Donated by Randy Robinson, Manhattan, KS.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

John S. Robinson, Canandaigua, was born in Penfield, Monroe county, April 15, 1827. When but a child his parents moved into Manchester, where he was educated in the common schools and a select school taught by J. P. Faurot, one of the oldest lawyers of this town. After leaving school he engaged with John Lamport in his foundry at Canandaigua, and in 1854 he engaged in the business for himself and went into the manufacture of railroad work for the Broad Gauge road running from Elmira to Niagara Falls. Mr. Robinson was undoubtedly the first one to make a chilled plow in the United States. While he was foreman for John Lamport in 1852 he was making plows, and thought that he could make a plow with a chilled surface on the wearing side of the mould board, and he did cast a mould board on a chill that year. The idea lay dormant from this time until 1873, when, after many experiments, he made it a success and was granted a patent March 24, 1874, for the process of chilling and carbonizing plow mould boards and other castings. In 1876 he went to Syracuse and the Robinson Chilled Plow Company was organized for the manufacture of chilled plows. This company is now known as the Syracuse Chilled Plow Company. In 1877 he returned to Canandaigua and with his son, E. C. Robinson, is now conducting the Robinson Chilled Plow Works in the old manufactory, the only company now manufacturing plows that is not a stock organization. Mr. Robinson married in 1850 Jane Utter of Canandaigua, and they have three children: Edson C., Mary S., wife of Rev. J. E. Werner of Haddonfield, NJ; and Margaret, wife of Samuel Wood of Haddonfield, NJ. Mr. Robinson has always taken an active interest in political affairs in his town, and has twice been elected village trustee. Edson C. Robinson was born in Canandaigua, December 22, 1854, educated in Canandaigua Academy, and after serving two years as bookkeeper in his father's office, he joined his father in 1878 as partner in the Robinson Chilled Plow Company. He married, September 26, 1877, Kate Shaw of Rochester, and they have five children: Edson E., Ella Shaw, John M., Ray Utter and Leon Wood. Mrs. E. C. Robinson died December 9, 1892, age 38 years. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

S. P. Robinson, Manchester, was born in Manchester, February 3, 1823. He is of Connecticut ancestry on his father's side and Mohawk Dutch on his mother's. He has followed agricultural pursuits nearly all his life, also conducting a hotel in Phelps for twenty years. He has held a number of town offices, overseer of the poor, district trustee, etc. He is a staunch Democrat and a valuable party worker. He has also had charge of the Gypsum Cemetery for many years. He married a Miss Mosier, and they have had three children, the oldest child being deceased.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robinson, Wesley D., Seneca, was born in Springwater, Livingston county, November 28, 1843.  He was educated in the common schools and five years in Canandaigua Academy, and is a teacher by occupation.  July 23, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth N.Y.S. Vols., mustered into the service August 22, 1862, and was severely wounded in the thigh at the battle of Gettysburg.  After recovering to some extent he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps in 1864, and was honorably discharged August 22, 1865.  He has married twice, first Eliza L. Tracy, of Grand Rapids, Mich., in February, 1868, who died in 1876.  He married second February 28, 1878, Emma J. Eaton, of Campbell, Steuben county, and they have had two children, a son Claude A., who died when he was two years old and Charlie D., born December 21, 1882.  Mr. Robinson's father, David A., was born in Scipio, Cayuga county, May 27, 1820, and was a farmer by occupation.  He married Malissa A. Botsford, of his native place, and they had eight children:  Wesley D., R. Lewis, Ellen M., Salome A., Frances E., Willis H., Charles H. who died at the age of three years, and Alfred E.  Mr. Robinson was elected justice of the peace in 1881, serving until the spring of 1893, when he was re-elected.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Willis H. Robinson, of Flint, Ontario county, was the third son of David A. and Melissa A. Robinson. He was born in Canandaigua, January 6, 1854. He was educated in the public schools and in early life lived with his parents on a farm near Gorham village. At the age of fifteen he with his parents moved to what was then known as Flint Creek (now Flint), where he still continued farm work for three years. At the age of eighteen he began work with his father at the heading business. At the age of twenty-one, he purchased a one-half interest in the business and became his father's partner, and continued in partnership with him until 1885, at which time he purchased his father's interest, and has since carried on the business alone.  The business has steadily grown, and in 1891 it amounted to nearly $12,000. In 1892 the business was interrupted by a disastrous fire, and new buildings and machinery have taken the place of the old ones on a much improved plan. November 7, 1876, Mr. Robinson married Sarah A. Stewart of Seneca, and they have one son, Stewart A., born December 22, 1884.  Mrs. Robinson's father, John E. Stewart of Penn Yan, Yates county, married Esther La Furge of Seneca, to whom, while living in Penn Yan, was born the one daughter, Sarah A.



From Phelps Citizen 11 December 1879

OUR EARLIEST SETTLER - In the old cemetery ground, in this village, and near by the entrance gate, may be found a grave marked by a slab of stone with this inscription: "In memory of JOHN DECKER ROBISON, Born at Anerum, Levingston Manor, May 11th, Old Style 1742, First settler in the town of Phelps, Arrived May 14th 1789, Departed this life January 18th, A. D. 1826, Aged 83 years, 6 months, & 7 days." By the one side of this grave, also marked by a stone slab, is the grave of his wife, inscribed as follows: "LENA ROBISON, the spouse of John D. Robison, the first settler of the town of Phelps, Departed this life November the 4th, 1808. aged 50 years." On the other side of his grave lies buried the body of Harry H. Robison, who is said to have been the first white child born in the town of Phelps. John Decker Robison settled on the farm now owned and occupied by Hugh Hammond, Esq., as you enter the village on the east, and is generally known as the "Woodhull" farm. A Mr. Woodhull married a daughter of Mr. Robison, and his family continued to reside on this farm until the year 1836, when it was sold to Russel Bement. Since that time the descendants of the deceased have become scattered far and wide.

The slab at the head of the grave of John Decker Robison, had become broken off a little above the surface of the ground, and just below the inscription on the stone. A few weeks since Ezra R. Woodhull, of Pultneyville, Wayne county, Mich., and Josephus Woodhull, of the town of Woodhull, Shiawassee county, Mich., nephews of the deceased, were in Phelps visiting the place of their nativity, which they left in 1856, looking up some of their old friends and acquaintances. While here they took occasion to visit the old cemetery, and on seeing the condition of the stone which marked their grandfather's grave, expressed a desire that the original stone might be repaired in some way and for many years still continue to mark the grave of their ancestor.

It will be gratifying to these gentlemen to learn that some of their friends since they were here have caused to be deeply sunk another slab resting against the back of the slab at their grandfather's grave, and securely bolted together the two stones, which cannot but be the means of preserving the original stone at least for several decades to come.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James Robson, Gorham, a native of Gorham, was born August 6, 1821, is a son of James, who was a native of England, and settled on a farm in Gorham about 1820. He also owned a farm of 100 acres near Blood's Corners, where he died. James Robson, sr., was born in Northumberland, England, in 1792, and married Ann Heslip.  They had three sons and two daughters. In 1820 Mr. Robson and family came to Gorham where he became one of the largest land owners in the town, owning at his death 800 acres, as well as a mill in Avoca, Steuben county. Here he was killed in 1854.  His wife died in July, 1851. James was the only one of the family born in America. He married Emily Harris, May 3, 1848, a daughter of Francis Harris, a native of Dutchess county and one of the early settlers of Gorham, where he owned about 800 acres. Mr. Robson had these children: William H., Annie J., Frank J., John E., Belle, Hiram, Emma M., Hattie L., Chas. W. and Phebe J. He owns 350 acres on which he has made many improvements. He is a Republican and has been commissioner of highways six years, and supervisor five years. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church at Gorham. 



From an unknown source:

James A. Robson has honored his town no less than himself by being appointed to several of the highest legal offices in the state.  He is the son of John and Isabella (Telfer) Robson, and was born in Gorham, Ontario county, New York, January 1, 1851.  He attended the district school of Gorham until 1865, when he was a student for one year at the Haveling high school, at Bath, New York; and the Canandaigua Academy in 1867-68.  He then matriculated at Yale University, from which he was graduated in 1873 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and then took up his legal studies in the Law School of Columbia University, New York City, being graduated from that institution in 1876 with the degree of Bachelor of Law.  He immediately established himself in the practice of his profession in Canandaigua, and was successfully engaged in it until 1903, when he was appointed justice of the Supreme Court of New York for the Seventh District filling the vacancy occasioned by the death of the Hon. William H. Adams.  In 1904 Mr. Robson was elected for a full term which will expire December 31, 1918.  January 8, 1907, he was appointed justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He has always supported Republican principles.
 


From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robson, John, Gorham, was born in Northumberland, England, June 2, 1819, a son of James Robson, jr., and was one year old when his parents came to America.  He was educated in Canandaigua Academy and in 1849 married Isabelle Telfer, a native of London, Canada, and daughter of Adam and Jane Heslip, early settlers of Spring Water, N.Y.  Mr. Robson and wife have had seven children:  James A., Jane T., Ann, Mary, Nellie (deceased), Phoebe E., and Fannie M.  Mr. Robson is a general farmer and owns 270 acres of the old homestead, on which he has made many improvements.  He is a Republican and has been assessor three years and supervisor five years.  He and family are members of the Presbyterian church at Gorham.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robert W. Robson, Seneca, was born on the homestead near Hall's Corners, April 20, 1845. He was educated in the district schools, Penn Yan Academy two terms and follows farming. December 22, 1875, he married Mary S. A. Smith of this town, and they had three children: Jennie, Willard S., who died at the age of three years, and Walter. Mr. Robson owns and occupies the farm formerly owned by William Brown, and on which he with his wife, Jane Straughan (both natives of Northumberland, Eng.) settled in the spring of 1805. Mrs. Brown's father, Robert Straughan, with his wife and eight children, came from England in the year 1801, and was one of the first of those composing the "English settlement in Seneca." Mr. Robson's father, Joseph, was born on the old homestead February 4, 1818. He married Polly B. Stoddard, Wyoming county, and they had six children, two of whom died in infancy: Robert W., Orson S., Mary J., and John A. His grandfather, John Robson, was born in Northumberland, England, in 1784, and came to the United States in 1800, where he married Lydia Chapman, and had seven children. Mrs. Robson's father, Nathaniel Smith, youngest son of William and Harriet Smith, was born in 1822, in the north part of the town of Geneva. He married Mary P. Brown of Seneca in 1846 and went to reside near Okemos, Ingham county, Mich., where their daughter, Mary S. A., was born. When six months old her mother died, August 3, 1850, when she was brought to live with her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William Brown. Her father died in Michigan in November, 1859.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Robson, Gorham, was born in Northumberland, Eng., October 13, 1813, a son of James Robson, jr. He was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools. January 24, 1842, he married Phoebe L. Sawtelle, a native of Gorham, born January 23, 1817, a daughter of Levi and Sarah Sawtelle, a native of Groton, Mass., and she of Hillsdale, NY. They were for many years residents of Cayuga county, and reared one son and nine daughters. In 1815 Mr. Sawtelle came to Gorham and settled the farm now owned by subject, where he died in 1852, and his wife in 1858. They were members of the Presbyterian church, of which Mr. Sawtelle was for many years ruling elder. Mr. Robson at present owns 280 acres of land, a brick block in Gorham village, and also property in Canandaigua. He has made many improvements on this farm; among them are good tenant houses.  Mr. Robson is a Republican but has always declined office. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, of which Mr. Robson has been ruling elder for 50 years



From Phelps Citizen 16 October 1902

Tomorrow is the 90th anniversary of the birth of a highly esteemed citizen of this community in the person of Norman Rockefeller. Mr. Rockefeller was born at Barrington, Columbia county, October 17th, 1812. His grandfather, on his mother's side, was Miles Avery, an officer in the Revolutionary war. Of a family of 9 children, Mr. Rockefeller and an older brother, William, aged 93, are the only survivors. The latter is the father of John D., William and Frank Rockefeller, the chief officers of the Standard Oil Co.

In 1840, Mr. Rockefeller was married to Miss Christina Blakeman and moved to Tioga county where he erected a home and resided for eight years. Here two sons were born to him, Asahel B., and Ira P. Rockefeller. In 1848 he moved to Phelps which has since been his home. After coming here he built the residence which for many years has been his home. His only daughter, Mrs. C. T. Bradley, was born here. Mr. Rockefeller has always been looked upon as a model citizen, being honest and upright, energetic, possessed of sound judgment and good business ability and a genial disposition. He has filled various town offices, always with credit to himself. A relic highly treasured by Mr. Rockefeller is a Bible presented to him when 10 years old, by Deacon Geo. Beckwith, for being the best scholar in the school at Great Barrington. Mr. Rockefeller is enjoying good health, for a man of his years and his faculties are but slightly impaired. It is to be hoped that his remaining years may be full of pleasant recollections, as they should be following a well-spent life.

The following brief history of the early Rockefellers will be found interesting. The Rockefellers came originally from Normandy. Rockefeller means rock and field, illustrated by the coat of arms, and is derived from the Norman French Roquefeuille. The family is of ancient Norse origin and the ancestral castle is in the southeastern part of France. The first to come from the country of the Palatines were John Peter (signed Peter in his will) and Tiel Rockefeller, who arrived in Philadelphia about 1720. John settled in New Jersey, near Flemington, on a large farm, near which is a stream which he and other Baptists were wont to use. Tiel went on to the Camps, or Livingston Manor, now known as Germantown, Columbia county, N. Y.

William, the grandson of John and Christina, the granddaughter of Tiel, were married June 3, 1772, in the old homestead. William and Christina were the great-grandparents of John Davison, William, Asahel B., Ira P. Rockefeller and Mrs. Clayton T. Bradley. The Rockefeller insignia is a handsome device in which the arms are quartered, the first and fourth quarters representing a gold rock on a field of red, and the second and third a hunter's horn upon a silver field. The border is of gold over which hangs the knotted "cordelieres," a decoration peculiar to the period of the crusades and still used by high dignitaries of the Church of Rome. The gold rock is the original emblem of the family, whose motto was "God is My Rock," but with the addition of the hunter's horn, which was the the insignia of a collateral ancestor, the motto was changed to signify "None More Faithful."



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Newton Rogers, Canandaigua, was born in Jerusalem, Yates county, July 21, 1830, a son of Reuel Rogers, a native of Jefferson county, and the father of nine children, three now living: Lucy, wife of James Doolittle, of Michigan; Mittie E., wife of John J. Stebbins, of Penn Yan; and Newton. The latter was but six years old when his parents moved to Ontario county, where they bought a farm near Cheshire. Newton was educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one leased a farm, and from that time has been engaged in agriculture. In 1850 he bought his present farm on the west shore of Canandaigua lake, a fine place of sixty-six acres, where Mr. Rogers had made many improvements. He had about twelve acres set out to grapes, and seven acres of peaches. He has always taken an interest in the success of his political party, but has never been an active politician. He was for three years assessor of his town. In 1854 he married Anzolett E., one of five children of Freeman Spaulding, a native of Massachusetts who came to Gorham in 1832 and to Canandaigua in 1850. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers have two children: Chauncey E., a farmer of Canandaigua, and Julia, wife of Charles E. Green, of Canandaigua.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Arthur Patrick Rose, long one of Geneva's most distinguished citizens, was born in the Town of Savannah, June 11, 1842, on the farm of his father, Charles A. Rose. When three years of age he came to Geneva and lived with his uncle, Dr. Gavin L. Rose, in the old Rose homestead on North Street which was the home of Arthur P. Rose until 1907. He attended Walnut Hill School and graduated from Hobart College in the Class of 1862. Mr. Rose then entered the law office of Folger and Mason and was admitted to the bar in 1865, and shortly afterward formed a partnership with the late Judge Francis O. Mason, which continued until the death of Judge Mason, July 25, 1900. For a considerable period of time Judge Mason was the legal representative of the Eastern branch of the Pulteney Estate, and upon his death Mr. Rose succeeded him. In 1903 this important estate was finally closed and Mr. Rose rendered a final accounting. Mr. Rose had a distinguished public career and held many local positions of trust and honor. On Sept. 22, 1905, he was nominated for the office of mayor  by the Democratic City Convention and in the following election was elected, being returned to office two years later. Mr. Rose was a charter member of the 34th Separate Company which was organized January 21, 1880. He served a full enlistment of five years as a private. In about 1907 Mr. Rose purchased the old Pulteney Land office building on Washington Street which was his home until his death July 5, 1929.



From "History of Grand Rapids and its Industries, Volume 1" By Dwight Goss. C.F. Cooper, 1906.

Dr. Charles H. Rose was born at Victor, Ontario Co., N. Y., October 27, 1845, to Thomas and Mary (Woolsey) Rose, with whom he came to Michigan when four years old, and settled in Hanson, Jackson Co. He attended the common schools of this county and Albion College; studied dentistry with Dr. Smith, of Jackson. Mich., and with Dr. Aldrich, of Geneva, N. Y. Commenced practice in 1870 at Grand Rapids where he has since remained. He enlisted October 2, 1877. in Co. B., 2nd Regt., Mich. State troops, was private one year and sergeant for four years; was transferred and promoted to Captain of Co. I., 2nd Regt., June 27. 1882. and served six years: promoted to Major of 2nd Regt. July, 1888. and to Colonel in August, 1892, and mustered out as such March 30, 1895, and honorably discharged.

Dr. Rose is a Mason, and member of the Dental Society. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Westminster Presbyterian Church.

He was married in Battle Creek, Mich., in 1869. to Miss Emma A. Howe. [page 240]
Thanks to Martha Magill for this contribution.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edward Rose, Geneva, was born in Geneva, December 24, 1841, educated in the public schools and is a natural mechanic, but his eye sight failing, caused him to abandon that vocation. February 16, 1892, he married Anna E. Abbot, of East Canaan, Conn. Mr. Rose's father, Sherman H., was born in Canaan, Conn., November 8, 1797 and October 11, 1820, he married Mary S. Lewis, of his native place, born April 16, 1798. and they had 6 children, who grew to maturity: Miles L., born September 21, 1822; Norman W., born February 13, 1827; Charles S., born October 13, 1832; Cornelia W., born October 18, 1835; William A., born April 28, 1839; and Edward. Mrs. Rose's father, Henry Abbot, was born January 25, 1817, and married Elizabeth Loomis, who was born near Barrington, Mass., in 1818. They had 9 children.  Mrs. Rose's oldest brother served in Co. H., Second Massachusetts Heavy Artillery.  Mr. Rose's brother, served in the Twenty-sixth Iowa Volunteers.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The late Ezra Cullen Rose, Victor, was born in Rush, educated in the common schools and Lima Seminary, and was a farmer. July 3, 1872, he married Julia Isabel Rainsford, of Victor, and they have five children: Nathan C., Isabel, Clifford, Rainsford and Dean.  Mr. Ezra Cullen Rose died January 10, 1892. Mr. Rose's father, Nathan C., was born in Rush, Monroe county, November 13, 1812. May 19, 1840, he married Hannah Fosdick, formerly of Granville, Washington county. The ceremony took place in Bethany, Genesee county. He was educated in the common schools and Lima Academy. They had six children: George I., Henry F., Ezra C., James N., Charles and Louise. Mr. Nathan C. Rose died October 23, 1891, and his wife March 1, 1883. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rose, George L., West Bloomfield, was born in Bethany, March 1, 1841, and came to Victor in 1851 with his parents.  His father, Nathan C., was born in Rush, Monroe county, and his grandfather, Nathan, was of English descent, born in Berkshire county, Mass, in 1772.  He became one of the earliest settlers in East Bloomfield.  His first child, Harley, was born there in 1797, and lived to be over ninety years old.  Nathan's father fought in the French and Indian war and seven years in the Revolution.  He was with Washington at Valley Forge.  He died at East Bloomfield.  Nathan C. was a farmer, and married Hannah Fosdick, of Bethany, in 1840, by whom he had six children: George I.; Henry F., a commission merchant in Detroit, Mich.; Ezra C., who died in 1891 at Victor; James N., also a commission merchant at Detroit; Charles, a farmer of Victor; and Louisa, wife of George Kilthorne, of Victor.  George I. Was educated in the common schools and at Lima Seminary, and helped his father at farming until of age, when he enlisted from Victor in July, 1862, in Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York Infantry.  He was in thirteen engagements and was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry, but was immediately paroled and soon after exchanged.  He was wounded at Bristow Station, and again at Weldom Railroad, and was at Lincoln's inauguration in 1865.  On his return he came to West Bloomfield, where he has since resided.  He has taught school many terms and has been justice of the peace ten years.  For a long time he has been prosecutor of pension claims, and is a member of the G.A. R.  He is a farmer and occupies the farm formerly owned by his father-in-law, Caleb Kellogg.  In 1869 he married Mary L. Kellogg, by whom he has seven children:  George I., jr., Norma L. Caleb, Alexander, Sophia, and Henry.  Mrs. Rose's father was born in East Bloomfield, and her mother, Sophia Loughier, was a native of New Hampshire.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rose, Jared S., Farmington, was born in Victor, March 10, 1849.  He was educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy, and has always followed farming.  He was elected supervisor of Farmington in the spring of 1888, and served continuously four years, was town clerk ten years, and assessor two years.  December 19, 1871, he married Sarah L., daughter of Hiram L. and Nancy Bloodgood, of Victor, and they have six children; Smith J., William H., E. Adeline, Verna L. Lydia N., and Edgar J.  Mr. Rose's father, Henry was born in England, March 28, 1821, and came to the Untied States when he was about sixteen years old.  About 1840 he married Lydia E., daughter of Wilmarth and Saloma (Eddy) Smith, of the town of Farmington.  They had six children, two died in infancy, four survived:  Jared S., Mary A., Edgar D., and Carrie E.  Mary A. married George P. Powers, and had two children, Frank O., and Lula.  Mrs. Powers died in 1884.  Edgar D., wife and children, all died December 6, 1881.  Mr. Rose's mother's grandfather, Jonathan Smith, was one of the pioneers of the town.  The Smiths were identified with the town growth and prosperity.  Mrs. Rose's father, Hiram L. Bloodgood, was born in Dutchess county in 1829, was a farmer and married Nancy Young, of Farmington.  They had six children, two died in infancy, four survived:  Sarah L., Emma, Mulford C., and William J.  Mrs. Rose is a member of the M. E. church of Victor, and Mr. Rose of the Society.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Oswald J. C. Rose, was the son of Robert Selden Rose, and was born in New York City, January 30, 1852. He was educated in the Geneva schools and was graduated from Hobart College. He established himself in a hardware business in 1874 in partnership with P. J. Dorchester. When Mr. Dorchester died his son, Edward G., assumed the interests of his father. Mr. Rose was, for many years, one of Geneva's leading business men and most prominent citizens. His business activities were widely diversified and he was a director in a number of concerns. He was a Democrat and served as alderman and supervisor. Mr. Rose married Miss Edith Ayrault, daughter of Rev. Ayrault, a former chaplain of Hobart. Mr. Rose died June 26, 1928.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Peter Cole Ross, Canadice, was born where he now lives, July 20, 1842. His father, Peter C. Sr., a native of New Jersey, born in 1806, came when a boy with his parents, Jasper and Martha Rose, to this town. At an early day Peter C., Sr., married in 1833 Julia A. Dickerson, and had three sons and a daughter: Nelson D., George W., Sarah Ann, and Peter C., also one, Lewis P., who died young. He was a farmer where his son Peter C. now lives.  He died in 1843. His son George W. hired out to the government as a teamster during the war, was taken prisoner at the battle of the Wilderness, and was last heard of in Lynchburg prison. Peter C. enlisted in the One Hundred Eighty-eighth N. Y. Infantry in 1864, and was in several engagements, among which were Five Forks and Hatcher's Run. He was wounded at Five Forks and is now a pensioner. He was discharged at the close of the war.  Peter's mother married second Heber Harris, by whom she had two children: Persis E. and Emily Harris. Mrs. Harris now makes her home with Peter C. The latter married in 1866 Catharine M. Struble. He married second, in 1875, Sophia McNair. He farms sixty acres, and has been constable four years.  In politics he is a Democrat. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rowley, Franklin, Victor, was born two miles north of the village of Victor, October 14, 1822.  He was educated in the district schools and was a farmer.  December 23, 1858, he married Jennette, daughter of William and Hortense (Mitchell) Wilder, and they had three sons:  Calvin, who married Elizabeth Whittleton of Walworth, and have three children:  Alonzo G., Alvirette and Cora; Charles A., who is a physician; he graduated from Lima Seminary and Cleveland Homeopathic Hospital College in 1888; William W. is in Chicago; Frank is a druggist; Clark B. is an agent in Buffalo; and George is a clerk in this village.  Mr. Rowley's father, Andrew, was born in Stockbridge, Mass. in 1800, and came to Victor with his parents when a boy.  He married Sarah Biglow and had four children:  Franklin, Elizabeth, Sarah and Biglow.  Mr. Rowley's grandfather was captain in the war of 1812.  Mrs. Rowley's father, William Wilder was born in the town of Bristol, March 1, 1802, and married Hortense Mitchell of his native town.  They had twelve children. Mrs. Rowley's grandfather, Gamaliel, was one of the first settlers in that region, and took a skiff and went on Canandaigua Lake to Wilder's Point, and having the choice between East Bloomfield and Bristol, he chose the latter, and was the leading spirit of those days building churches, mills and other necessary improvements.  These sturdy pioneers came from Connecticut.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rowley, George Washington, Richmond, was born in Bristol, November 19, 1827.  His father, Darius, and grandfather, Charles, came from Cayuga county here about 1810, and after nearly ten years they removed to South Bristol.  Charles died about 1852.  Darius married Dolly, daughter of Harry Gilbert, of Bristol.  Their children were:  Sophia, George W., Abagail, Palmer, William, Mary, Zidona (the latter three deceased), Thaddeus, and Edson M.  George W. spent his boyhood in the district schools and on his father's farm until 1850, when he married Charlotte, daughter of Caleb Bliss, of Bristol (formerly of Massachusetts), and Zilpha Gerry who came from Dighton, Mass.  They have had three children:  Mary, who married Orrin S. Beach, a farmer of this town; Ida, deceased; and Belle, who married F. I. Short, of Attleboro, Mass.  Mr. Rowley settled in Richmond in 1850, and in 1867 purchased his present farm of 200 acres at Richmond Mills.  On the site of his present residence stood at an early day the "West Richmond Hotel," Silas Reed, proprietor.  It was a large log building, plastered inside.  Besides this place Mr. Rowley has two other farms.  He has been justice of the peace twenty years, and is a Republican and supporter of the Methodist church, of which his wife is a member.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Roy, Isaac, Phelps, the only survivor of seven children of John and Edna (Parrish) Roy, was born in Phelps, November 22, 1817.  The father, John, was born in Scotland, November 15, 1779.  The grandfather, Coll Roy, was born in the Highlands of Scotland in 1750.  He emigrated to this country in 1792, and settled on the Mohawk.  In 1803 he settled upon the Roy farm in the eastern part of Phelps.  He died from the effects of a fall in 1827.  Edna Parrish Roy, the mother, was born in Maryland, March 31, 1775, she being a daughter or Richard Parrish, the family coming to Phelps about the year 1800.  Isaac Roy when a mere boy was compelled to work on a farm.  By hard work and careful application of his earnings he has acquired a handsome property, a portion of which is about 600 acres of the choicest land in Phelps.  He takes delight in keeping his farm in a high state of cultivation, and the buildings upon his several farms are exceptionally convenient and well kept.  He is a prominent member of the banking firm of John H. Roy & Company.  He is a close student of public questions, in which he has always been interested, and is a Democrat.  He is a philanthropist and generously supports every move that will tend to benefit his native town.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

John B. and Robert Rumney were merchants on the east side of Main Street opposite the north end of the park. They built the first steamboat on Seneca lake.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Theodore D. Rupert, M. D., Geneva, was born in Seneca, April 23, 1855, a son of William P. and Catharine (Bell) Rupert. He attended the public schools and Geneva Academy, read medicine with Dr. D. S. Allen, and graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1880. He practiced ten years in Mendon, Monroe county, and in 1890 located in Geneva. In 1880 he married Clara Bond of Geneva, and they have four children. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William P. Rupert, Seneca, was born in Seneca on the homestead farm December 15, 1828. He received a common school and academic education, and in early life was a teacher and farmer. In 1867 the Rupert nursery and stock farm was started and the public at home and abroad gave it liberal patronage. In 1887 the sons, Philip G., William T. and Frank E. were given an equal partnership interest under the firm name of W. P. Rupert & Sons. They have seventy acres devoted to the nursery interests and from the earliest period of its history it was the aim of Mr. Rupert to furnish first-class fruit and ornamental trees to the public. They have a branch office in Geneva in charge of Charles D. Leonard. In their choice short-horned stock they have sold very largely of their premium stock at the fair grounds in various places, but still winter at least a hundred head. May 24, 1854, he married Catherine Bell of Gorham, and they have six children: Theodore D., who is a physician in Geneva; Sophia E., Philip G., C. Belle. W. Thomas and Frank E. Mr. Rupert's father, Philip, was born in Little York, Pa., in 1782, and came to Geneva in 1804, keeping for that time a large shoe shop, employing many men. An incident occurred on Sunday in 1812 that rather shocked the proprietor. An officer with a large force of men going to fight the British, ordered him to open his store, which he did rather than have the soldiers open it, for they said, shoes we must have, Sunday or Monday, and a thriving business was done as long as the stock lasted. He married twice, first in 1805 Sarah Yates, formerly of New Jersey. For his second wife he married Mrs. Rebecca (Parkhurst) Yates, and they had nine children: Rosanna, Barnet, Philip H., Rebecca, Eliza A., Theodore B., Delos W., William P. and Rosetta P. Mr. Rupert's grandfather, Bernard, came from Germany in 1720, when seven years old. Mr. Rupert has been postmaster at Seneca nine years, and superintendent of the Sunday school in the Presbyterian church at Seneca twenty-five years.



From Shortsville Enterprise 26 March 1914






Matthew Russell, one of Shortsville's oldest residents, both in point of age and length of residence, here, was born in the town of Stane, County Meath, Ireland, on February 3, 1838. He was a son of the late Katherine Coralin and James Russell. Mr. Russell chose as his life partner Miss Mary McQuillan, the ceremony being performed in Ireland on October 2, 1857. They came to America on May 1, 1859, and located first in New York City. Later they moved to Jersey City, N. J., and in October, 1874, came to Shortsville to reside, making their home here since. The death of Mrs. Russell occurred in July, 1910, in this village. Eight children came to bless their union, six sons and two daughters. The angel of death has since removed four of the former. Mr. Russell is a faithful member of St. Dominic's Catholic church in this place and has always been a regular attendant until prevented by the infirmities of age.






From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Ryan, Edward P., Phelps, was born in Phelps, September 12, 1852, one of six children of Captain James Ryan, who was in the English army before coming to this country.  Mr. Ryan has always lived in Phelps.  In 1879 he went into the hotel business and has been engaged in it to the present time.  In the spring of 1884 he took possession of the "Cottage Hotel," of which he is still the popular landlord.  He married in February, 1876, Emma Maley of Phelps, and they have four children: Frank J., Jennie B., Edward, and Paul Leo, all of whom live in their present home adjoining the hotel.



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