"R" to "Rh" Surname Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Randall, Farmington, was born in Warwickshire, Eng., in 1826, and came to the United States in 1851, locating in Farmington, where he has been a successful farmer. In October, 1852, he married Dinah Ann Allen, who was born in Oxfordshire, Eng., in 1830, and came here the same year. They have ten children: Edward, born in 1853; Frank, born in 1857; Cora, born in 1859; Durfee, born in 1861; Eliza, born in 1863; Albert, born August 25, 1865; Herbert, born October 10, 1867; Wilkinson, born in 1871; John, born in 1873; and Walter, born in 1855. Edward married Charlotte Jeffrey, and has three children: Florence, Herman and Mabel; Walter married Chloe Morris, and has three children: Grace, Gertie and Harriet; Frank married Mary Donahoe; Cora married Frederick Knowles, and has two children, Mary B. and William E.; Durfee married Marion Soule; Eliza married Henry Howland; Herbert married Ida Pardee; three are not married, Albert, Wilkinson and John. The father and sons are all farmers. The two youngest are farmers with their father at home. Mr. Randall has resided on the farm he owns for twenty-one years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James Rankine, Geneva, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, November 5, 1827, and was the son of John and Elizabeth Rankine. The family came to the United States in 1835, and settled in Canandaigua. John Rankine was a lawyer by profession but in this county devoted his attention to farming. His sons, John and William Rankine, however, both practiced at the Ontario county bar. James Rankine, our subject, prepared for a collegiate course at the Canandaigua Academy, and was graduated from Union College with the class of ' 46. He then began studies with a determination to enter the Episcopal ministry, and after one year became connected with the faculty of Trinity College, at Hartford, Conn., where he remained six years, beginning as tutor and finishing his term there as assistant professor of mathematics; also being librarian of the institution. While here, in 1850, he was ordained to the diaconate by Bishop Brownell, and likewise received the master's degree from the college. In 1854 Mr. Rankine resigned from Trinity and became rector of St. Paul's church at Owego, where he remained six years, after which, in 1861, he was called to Geneva to take charge of the Theological Training School, which Bishop Delancey was then about to establish, and which is now known as the Delancey Divinity School, and over which Mr. Rankine has ever since had charge. Soon after coming to Geneva our subject was made trustee of Hobart College, and in 1863 that institution conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. Upon the death of the bishop in 1865, Mr. Rankine succeeded in the charge of the mission called St. Peter's, the outgrowth and result of which is St. Peter's Memorial church. This church and its parish have been under the pastoral care of our subject from the time of their founding, with the exception of a single year. In 1869 the bishop and trustees of Hobart College called Dr. Rankine to the presidency of the institution, a position he held for over two years, and after the period of difficulty had passed, he was allowed to withdraw therefrom and resume his parish and divinity school work. In 1853 James Rankine was married to Fanny, daughter of Charles B. Week, esq., of Canandaigua. Of this marriage nine children have been born, only five sons are now living.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Ransom, James, Victor, was born in Saugerties, Ulster county, September 25, 1835.  He was educated in the public schools and has always been a farmer.  March 4, 1856, he married Sarah S., daughter of Peter and Jane Youngs, of his native place, and came to Victor soon afterwards.  They have six children:  Wilson B., George, Raymond J., Allen, Rose B., and Eveline.  Wilson B., married Ophelia Rugg of Victor, and have three children:  Ella, Warren, and Norman.  George married Edith Wells of Victor.  Raymond married Cora Hare of Macedon, Wayne county, and has one daughter, Adelaide.  Rose married Willard Mann of Saugerties, and they have one son, Roy.  Mr. Ransom has acquired a fine property through industry, thrift and integrity.  He has changed the rugged features of nature and built a fine residence, which is fine in its architectural appearance, and the farm buildings are arranged in the best possible way for the care of stock.  His windmill cuts his fodder, grinds all kinds of grain, shells his corn, cuts his wood, and pumps his water for all purposes.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Willard J. Ransom, Canandaigua, was born in Manheim, October 20, 1839, a son of Samuel A., a farmer of that town. He was educated in the common schools, and on reaching his majority came to Farmington to superintend a farm and conduct a milk station. On August 29 he enlisted in the One Hundred Sixtieth N. Y. Volunteers, under Colonel Dwight. He was at Port Hudson, Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, Winchester, Cedar Creek and many minor engagements, making twenty-three in all. He was wounded at the siege of Port Hudson but not to disable him from further service, and was mustered out November 17, 1865. He returned to Herkimer county where he followed lumbering for a year, then went to Buffalo and operated a saw-mill one season, and was conductor on a street car for a year and a half. He worked for the N. Y. C. R. R. Co. for nearly three years, laying off on account of injuries and accident. He was foreman for J. Ives & Co. in their saw-mill for over seven years, when he started a planing and shingle mill at Salisbury Centre, conducting it two years, and then sold out and came to Canandaigua, where he conducted the Lake Breeze Hotel for two years, and in January, 1886, he started a restaurant, which he conducted until September, 1892, when he moved into the block recently erected by J. J. Dwyer, which he opened as a hotel, and as a popular host is winning the patronage of the traveling public. The accommodations here are the best that can be found between Syracuse and Rochester on the Auburn Railroad. Mr. Ransom married, December 21, 1875, Annie, daughter of Thomas Wainman, of Jordanville, Herkimer county. He is a member of the G. A. R. and of the K. of  P.



From Victor Herald Newspaper 6 July 1895

Memorial Held at St. Paul's Universalist Church, Victor, N. Y. - The Hon. Samuel Rawson was born in West Stockbridge, Mass., in the year 1781, Oct. 14th. Of his life little is known as the manner and extent of it, but that it was thorough one, and well supplemented by his own reading, was evident to those who knew him. The strong mind, well-stored with knowledge gained during an eventful life, and the dry wit which characterized his conversation, daily refreshed and enlivened all who came in contact with him. His wife, Lydia Burgett by name, was also of New England birth, and their marriage occurred in Mass., but the date of it cannot now be ascertained. Five children were born to them, none of whom now survive. In the early years of the present century, the family journeyed from their New England home to western New York. In 1812, Mr. Rawson, afterwards known as Judge Rawson, purchased a farm in the west part of district No. 1, which contains the village of Victor. "The next year, he moved his family on his purchase, and began to clear his land." Here they remained; and upon this homestead, still the property of the Rawsons -- occurred the death of the "Judge," March 4th, 1874, having spent the last sixty years of his life in Victor. In considering the subject of our sketch as a citizen, we find in him that spirit of enterprise, independence, and courage.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Oscar Fitzallen Ray, Canadice, was born in Springwater, Livingston county, March 6, 1841. His grandfather, John, a native of New Hampshire, came from Virginia with his wife and six children in a one-horse wagon to Richmond. One of his sons was John Jr., the father of Oscar. After teaching school several winters, and working on the farm summers, he married Hannah C. Bishop, of Richmond, and they had eight children, four of whom survive: Martha, wife of Homer Johnson of this town; Barzillai, a farmer in Michigan; Richmond, in Springwater; and Oscar F. The latter was educated in home district school and Lima Seminary, taught school winters and worked on his father's farm summers. In 1866 he married Sarah Thompson, of Springwater, and settled on the Dr. Austin farm, located in the southern part of Canadice. They have two daughters: Mary Arabelle, born in 1874, and Marion, born in 1880. Mr. RAY farms 375 acres, and is especially interested in stock raising --- horses and Merino sheep, keeping a flock of about 200 sheep. He has been assessor seven years, was supervisor in 1877-78-79, and is an active Republican. In response to a request from the National Committee that suggestions be sent to them for some new and improved method of selecting delegates for national conventions, among those sent in was the following plan by Mr. Ray: "Let there be a convention called in each congressional district, said convention to be composed of a certain number of delegates from each assembly district within such congressional district; the congressional district convention to elect two delegates and two alternates for the national convention and nominate an elector. Also three delegates and three alternates for a state convention that shall have the power to elect delegates at large and their alternates." A report was adopted without discussion embracing all of Mr. Ray's recommendations, thereby largely doing away with ring rule. All the family are Methodists. Mrs. Ray's grandfather, Isaac Bishop, soon after coming to Richmond, this county, was aiding at the raising of a barn, when a bent fell and pinned two men down. The other was killed. Mr. Bishop was held by the neck, but a pin prevented the whole force of the blow from him, yet his injury was such that, though he recovered physically, he was never able to speak fully his thought, though he would understand when others spoke the word he lacked.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Nathan Redfield, Farmington, was born June 1, 1834, in Livingston county, and came to Farmington with his parents when he was five years old. He was educated in the common schools and followed farming. December 9, 1857, he married Ruth, daughter of Burling and Hannah Hoag of this town, formerly of Greene county. They have no children, and own a good farm in the southern part of Farmington. Mr. Redfield's father, Ezra, was born in Hopewell, February 12, 1812. He moved to Steuben county, and married Lucy A. Bolster, who was born September 12, 1806. They have four sons: Nathan, William, Henry J. and George. Mrs. Redfield's father, Burling Hoag, was born in Baltimore, Greene county, April 8, 1802, and married Hannah Bedell of his native place. They have four children: Benjamin C., Hannah B., Ruth C. and Anna E. Mrs. Hoag was born December 1, 1801, and they came here from Albany. The railway extended no further in 1838. Mrs. Hoag resides with her daughter, Mrs. Redfield, in her 91st year. Mrs. Redfield's father, Burling Hoag, died in 1878. Mr. Redfield's father, Ezra Redfield, is still living in the town. His mother died October 14, 1851. Mr. Hoag's grandfather, Eli Nelson, was impressed in the British navy for seven years. Mr. Redfield's brother, George, was a soldier in the Civil war, and was honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of service. Mr. Redfield had been one of the assessors of this town eight years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The Reed Family;  Philip Reed and his descendants have constituted a large portion of the inhabitants of Richmond.  The oldest ancestor which can be traced is Jacob, who went from Saybrook, Conn., to Pawlet, Vt. Philip, his son, came to Richmond with Lemuel Chipman (afterwards judge and congressman) and Dr. Cyrus Chipman, in June, 1794, on a prospecting tour, and in February, 1795, he arrived with his wife and children, John Fitch, Silas and Wheeler, together with a slave girl, and Isaac Adams, his assistant. With Philip came the families of the Chipmans. Sleighing was good, and the trip was made in eighteen days. Philip was the owner of $3,000 and considered a rich man in those days. He bought in the western part of the town about 1,000 acres, to which he added later on, and gave each of his sons a farm. Squire Reed was a prominent man of the town. He built a grist-mill and a saw-mill. He was justice of the peace for many years and the first poormaster of the place.  His wife was Margaret, daughter of Colonel Fitch, one of the "Bennington Boys." After coming to Richmond they had three children: William Fitch, Philip 2d, and Alta Fitch. Mr. Reed built the first brick house in town, from brick and lime manufactured on the place. The compensation for the construction and painting was to be $400.00 of which $50 was to be paid in cash and the balance in "good cattle, wheat and pork," and a provision in the contract was that Reed should "board the contractor, Lewis Morey, and all the men he should employ, and to give each man during the time he should be employed two gills of whisky per day." The original contract is now in possession of Mrs. F. D. Short, who occupies the old house, which was built during the year 1803. Philip died in 1828 and his wife in 1833. Colonel John Fitch Reed, oldest child of Philip, was born in Pawlet, Vt., in 1782.  He married Antha, daughter of Isaac Steele of New Hartford, Conn.  Of their eight children, Wheeler 2d, Philip 3d, and John A. are living.  Wheeler 2d was born in 1811, educated at Canandaigua Academy and married in 1838 Phila G. Wimple (who died in 1890) and settled on the farm he now occupies, a portion of his grandfather's purchase.  He has eight children. Mr. Reed has been assessor many years and built the farmhouse now occupied by his son, Norman K., in 1842. His son Almeron, a member of the First N. Y. Mounted Rifles, served in the war nearly three years. Mrs. Reed's father, Jacob Wimple, came from the Mohawk Valley, and her grandfather, Dea. Nathaniel Harmon, came here from Vermont. He was a relative of the Chipmans. Norman Kellogg Reed, son of Wheeler 2d, born September 19, 1848, was educated at Canandaigua Academy, and has always lived on the home farm. He is now owner with his father of that portion of the farm east of the road, and his sister Emily W. owns that portion west of the road, where she and her father live. Norman K. married, in 1873, Caroline, daughter of Anson and Lucy Ann (Bowen) Arnold, and they have two children: Eugene Lawrence, born September 11, 1878; and Irving, born September 27, 1880.  Philip 3d, son of John F., was born November 1, 1813, and married, in 1837, Louisa Wemple, by whom he had one son, Henry Harrison. He married again in 1847, Emily Bostwick. Mr. Reed has been poormaster twenty-three years and commissioner of highways nine years. He resided on his father's farm until the age of thirty-four years, then purchased his present farm. He and his son have about 450 acres.  Henry Harrison Reed, son of Philip 3d, was educated at Canandaigua Academy. He was born December 12, 1840, and married in 1862 Elizabeth, daughter of Hiram Gooding.  They have six children: Fred G., born in 1846, a commercial traveler; Louise, born in 1867, an art teacher in De Mille College in Canada; Hallie; Philip 4th, born in 1874, a student at Lima; Murray E., born in 1877; Florence W., born in 1878, and Roy, born in 1879. Deacon John Alexander Reed, son of John Fitch, was born October 12, 1826; attended East Bloomfield Academy. He married in 1854, Mary Eveline Ashley, daughter of Noah Ashley 2d, and they have had eight children: Mary Eveline, born in 1855; Edwin, born in 1858, who at the age of 21 years traveled in the west and died in Dakota in 1880; Martha, born in 1860, now the wife of Mr. Waterbury of Lansing, Mich.; Anna L., born in 1863, now Mrs. Gilbert of Bristol; Frank A., born in 1865, married Violet Quick, and lives in Wichita, Kan.; Augusta E., born in 1867; John F., born in 1869, now at Syracuse University; F. William, born in 1871, and Robert F. and N. Raymond (twins), born in 1876. Mr. Reed owns 240 acres, of which 180 acres was the home farm of his father. His fine residence was erected in 1884, but the old house still stands.  It was built in 1820. Samuel Palmes Reed was born February 17, 1827, and Charles Edward Reed was born August 17, 1839. Their father, William Fitch Reed, son of Philip 1st, was born in this town in 1800. He was educated at East Bloomfield Academy, and married Amelia C., daughter of Andrew Palmes, who came in 1820 from Litchfield county, Conn., but was a native of New London, and a Revolutionary soldier. He died in this town in 1846 aged 91 years. William F. had seven children: Caroline A., Samuel P., Theodosia, Martha, Edward, Charles E., Frances W., of whom only Samuel and Charles are now living. William F. was a farmer, and was supervisor during 1839-49 and 1857-58. He was commissioned by Gov. De Witt Clinton second lieutenant of cavalry in the Twelfth Regiment. He had of his father, Philip, 220 acres, and built a fine house in 1827, now occupied by the sons. He died in 1862 and his wife in 1877. His son Samuel P. was educated at Lima Academy and Canandaigua Academy, and taught school several years. He has never married, and has lived on the farm with his brother, Charles E. The latter was educated at Lima Seminary. He enlisted in the One Hundred Forty-eighth N. Y. Vols., in 1862 as a private. He was on detached duty as a sharpshooter part of the time, and was appointed first lieutenant. He was in several engagements about Richmond, and commanded his company (G) at the close of the Civil war. In 1867 he married Amelia B. Wells of Michigan. Her grandfather was an early settler of this town. Mr. and Mrs. Reed have had four children: James Wells, born in 1870; George Pitts, born in 1873; Caroline A., born in 1875; Lizzie M., born in 1884. Mr. Reed was supervisor in 1873-74-75-76, and is now (1892) filling that position. He is a republican. Philip 2d, youngest child of Philip 1st, was born in the brick house erected by his father in 1806, and died their October 18, 1857. He married Betsey, daughter of Levi Blackmer in 1827, and their children were: Gideon Pitts, born in 1828, died in 1853; Almon Clark, born in 1831, died in 1854; Henry Gilbert, born in 1836, died in 1877; Albert Stevens, born in 1839, is now in California; Thomas Richmond, born in 1841; Alice Eliza (died in 1861) and Adelaide Elizabeth (twins), born in 1845.  The latter is now Mrs. Fayette D. Short, and resides in the old brick house. 



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Charles B. Reed, Bristol, a native of Bristol, was born September 12, 1847.  His father was William A., son of William, a native of Taunton, Mass., who came to Bristol in an early day.  He was a shipbuilder, and had two sons and a daughter. William A. Reed was born March 22, 1822.  His father died when he was eight years old, and William A. was left to make his own way. He first worked eight months for three dollars per month.  He managed to get a common school education, and for several terms taught school.  He was a great reader and a man well informed.  He married Mary A., daughter of Gooding Packard, and had two sons and a daughter:  Charles B., William A. (deceased), M. Helen, deceased wife of Samuel Moranda, of Bristol. She left two children:  Howard and Thurston.  During the last fifteen years of Mr. Reed's life he was engaged in mercantile business at Bristol Centre, and was very successful.  He was justice of the peace one term, supervisor five years, and was notary public for many years, and did an extensive business.  He died March 29, 1888, and his wife resides in Bristol. Charles B. was reared in Bristol Centre, and educated in the common schools.  He clerked in Canandaigua for John S. McClure, and afterwards clerked for his father fourteen years.  Mr. Reed is a natural artist, and although has but little time to give to that kind of work, has ornamented his home with very beautiful pictures.  Mr. Reed is at present engaged in farming and hop growing, and has been a breeder of Shropshire sheep.  He is a Republican, but not an aspirant to office. He is a member of the Rod and Gun Club of Canandaigua, and Lakeside Gun Club of Geneva, N. Y.  October 22,1876, Mr. Reed married Ella B. Brown, born in Oneida county, December 17, 1852, daughter of Allen and Delilah (Mantors) Brown, of Oneida county, both deceased; they also had one son, Harrison, who died April 13, 1881, leaving two children: Nelly B. and Sada.  Mr. Reed and wife have three children: Clara M., Cora A. (deceased), and William A.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Reed, De Forest E., Gorham, was born in Potter, January 31, 1858, a son of Austin, whose father, Joshua, was a native of Italy, Yates county, and was the father of three sons and seven daughters.  Austin was born in Italy in 1825.  When a young man he went to Michigan and followed teaching several years, and there married Elizabeth Irwin, a native of Champlain, born in 1830.  Her parents were James and Betsey Irwin.  To Mr. Reed and wife were born two sons and three daughters.  Mr. Reed is a farmer of Yates county.  He is a Republican in politics and has been assessor and excise commissioner.  He is a member of the Grange at Rushville.  De Forest E. was educated in Rushville Union School and is a farmer and carpenter.  In 1880 he purchased the Washburn farm of 110 acres, and the same year married Emma Washburn of Gorham, born December 17, 1855.  Their children are: Annie L., Orin W. and Frank C.  Mr. Reed is a Republican and was elected justice of the peace but never qualified.  He and his wife are members of the M. E. church at Rushville.  The parents of Mrs. Reed are Richard M. and Annie (Gage) Washburn, who had one son and one daughter.  Mrs. Annie Gage Washburn was a daughter of Marvin, son of Amasa Gage.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Reed, of Hartland, Conn., came to this county in 1820, following with the rest of his family two sons who had come out earlier. He settled in Bristol. His wife was Nancy Bushnell of Connecticut, and they had five sons and five daughters. His son Uriel was born in Connecticut and came here with his father. He married Nancy Frost of Bristol about 1825, and there children were: Corintha J., Marietta, Nancy Annis, Ann Elizabeth (all deceased), Uriel J., George W., a farmer in Richmond. Uriel Jerome Reed was born August 21, 1832, in Bristol, and at ten years of age came with his parents to East Bloomfield and was educated at the common schools and at the Lima Seminary. He came to this town and settled on the State road east of the village in 1869, where he has a fine farm and a comfortable home. He married in 1856 Martha A. Totman of Bristol, and they have three children: Homer J., born in 1860, a lawyer of Canandaigua; Ettie A., wife of Dr. Louis R. Head of Madison, Wis.; and Belle, at home with her parents. Mr. Reed has held the office of town assessor and in politics is a Republican. Mrs. Reed's father, Ira Totman, came from Luzerne, N. Y., to Bristol, and married in that town Nancy Gregg, whose grandfather came from Scotland to Massachusetts.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry Reed, Victor, was born in Saratoga county, near the famous Springs, July 2, 1819, and came with his parents to Gorham, Ontario county, when he was eight years old. Afterwards they came to Phelps, where he was educated in the district schools and Canandaigua Academy and has been a farmer for several years. January 1, 1844, he married Clarissa H., daughter of Jeremiah and Sally Richardson of Victor, and they had three children: Ernest R., who is well educated and married Lottie Parks of Victor, and has two children: Vera L. and Urma P.; Lilia M., who married John Feiock, and has five children: Alice C., Henry R., John B., Clarence and Emmett L.; one of the daughters died. In politics Mr. Reed has always been a Republican.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James Reed, Bristol, was born in Bristol, April 8, 1823, a son of George, whose father was George, a native of Hartland, Conn., who died in Bristol, where he came in 1819. His wife was Nancy Bushnell, by whom he had five sons and five daughters. He died March 25, 1835, and his wife October 1, 1844. His son George was born in 1793 in Hartland, and came to Bristol in 1815. He married Loretta, daughter of James Case, by whom he had six children: Nancy, Betsey, George, James, William and Nelson. His wife died in 1828, and he married Luna Reed, of Hartland, Conn., by whom he had three children: Reuel, Purmelia, and Loretta. He died August 3, 1837, and his second wife in 1868. James was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools, and has been twice married; first to Sallie Thomas, of Bristol, who was born September 17, 1828, by whom he had one daughter, Elizabeth, who married Horace Case, of Bristol, and died June 24, 1876. Mrs. James Reed died in 1850, and the same year he married Lucinda, daughter of Stephen Beach, whose father was Bernard, of Hartland, Conn., who came to Bristol about 1800. Mr. Reed and second wife have four children: George W., a farmer of South Bristol; Belle, wife of Warner J. Simon, of Canandaigua; Martha, wife of Herman Van Vechten; and Reuel J. He married Emma Hunn, daughter of Thomas Hunn, and they have three children: Ethel M., Fannie E., Bertha A. Mr. Reed owns 140 acres. He is a Republican and has been excise commissioner for many years. He and wife are members of the M. E. church, and Mr. Reed has been trustee and steward for many years. Abner Reed, a brother of George Reed, jr., was a local minister of Bristol, and preached three hundred fifteen funeral sermons.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John Reed, Canandaigua, was born in Yorkshire, England, May 12, 1839, and came to this country in 1857. Having an uncle, John Clark, living in Canandaigua, he located here, and worked for his uncle by the month for a number of years, then became partner with him. He spent two years on a farm in Gorham, then returned to this place where he made his home. At the death of Mr. Clark, December 28, 1890, the property, consisting of over 200 acres, was left to Mr. Reed, who had become a member of the family by marrying Mary Eliza, the daughter. Mr. Reed took little interest in public affairs, but devoted his attention to the success of his farm. Mrs. Reed died September 23, 1882, leaving no children. Mr. Reed married second, August 2, 1887, Mary Elizabeth Hall, a native of Yorkshire, Eng., and they have had two children: Mary E., born December 24, 1888, and John A., born July 5, 1890. Mr. Reed died September 30, 1891, death resulting from a fall while picking apples in his orchard. Mr. Reed was well known to the people of this section. He was an honest, upright citizen, quiet in his manner, and a thorough business man.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Joseph Reed, Manchester, was born in Switzerland, October 28, 1828. He came to this country thirty-eight years ago, and after working six years by the month, he purchased in 1865 a farm of 125 acres, which he has since conducted most successfully. He married Margaret Lennon and they have one child, William H. Mr. Reed has served as commissioner of highways, etc. He is a staunch Democrat. William H., his son, assists him in the management of his farm and other business. He is a young gentlemen of superior attainment and education. He married Cornelia Hollenbeck, and they have one child, a boy. Both Joseph and his son William H. enjoy the confidence and esteem of this community.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lewis J. Reed, Bristol, was born in Bristol, February 9, 1846. His father is Seymour (son of George), who was born in Hartland, Conn., March 8, 1814, and came with his parents to Bristol when young. He has been twice married, first to Roxena, daughter of George Gooding, of Dighton, Mass., and an early settler of Canandaigua. She left one son, and died August 4, 1843. Mr. Reed then married Betsey Johnson, and had a son and a daughter. Her father was Lewis Johnson, of New Jersey, who died in Canandaigua. Mr. Reed has been one of the leading farmers of Bristol, owning 200 acres of land. In early life he was a Whig and afterwards a Republican. He was assessor for six years, and highway commissioner several years. His second wife died in 1871, since which time he has resided with his son. Lewis J. was reared on a farm and educated in Canandaigua Academy. In 1872 he married Mary S. Raines, of Canandaigua, born in 1851. Her father was Rev. Joseph Raines, of Hull, England, who came to Canandaigua when a young man. He married Hannah Glover, by whom he had four daughters and six sons. He was a local minister and preached in Canandaigua and Bristol. He died in 1888 while living in East Saginaw, Mich. Lewis J. Reed and wife have had the following children: Lewis J. (deceased), Seymour, Clifford R., Mary E., and Grant S. Mr. Reed is a general farmer and owns 175 acres. In politics he is a Republican, and was supervisor in 1882. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294 F. & A. M., and Excelsior Chapter No. 164.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mason H. Reed, Gorham, was born in Gorham July 22, 1806, a son of Samuel, a son of Ezra, a native of Dutchess county. Samuel married Lucy Towner of Dutchess county, and had five sons and a daughter. About 1795 he came to Gorham and settled near Reed's Corners where he died in 1813, and his wife at ninety-five years of age. Samuel was a soldier in the War of 1812. Mason H. married Clarissa Nash, by whom he had one son, Alvah (deceased), who married Caroline Rodgers and had three children. He married second Lana Brown of South Bristol by whom he had one child Lana, who died aged six months. Mr. Reed sold the old homestead and purchased another farm and now owns 150 acres. Since 1845 Mr. Reed has been a Democrat, and has been assessor twelve years, but never accepted any other office although urged to do so. He gave the land at Reed's Corners on which the Congregational church stands; and attends and supports that church. He also gave seven and one-half acres of the World's Fair ground in Gorham to the association in 1853. Mr. Reed has always been a temperance man.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Wm. Allen Reed, Canandaigua, was born at Seneca Castle in Seneca, May 17, 1834, a son of Ward, who was a son of Taft Reed. He, with two brothers, Nathan and John, were the first of the family to settle in this country, locating near Geneva. Taft was twice married and has seven children by each wife. Ward, a child of the first wife, was born January 25, 1799, and lived in Seneca. He was a prominent man in church work at Seneca Castle, and was many years a steward and trustee of the Methodist Church. He was twice married, to daughters of Thomas Tallman, a miller and farmer of Seneca. His first wife, Amanda Tallman, lived but a short time, and his second wife, Matilda, he married in February, 1828. She bore him two children: Amanda T., who married Munroe Phillips, a farmer and hay dealer of Davenport, Ia., and William Allen. Ward Reed died in Seneca July 4, 1874. Our subject was educated in the common school and Lima Seminary, and on reaching his majority bought a farm of eighty-one acres in Seneca, which he conducted three years, and then sold and bought one near Seneca Castle. He lived there until 1866 when he bought a farm in Hopewell. He came to Canandaigua in 1881, locating two miles north of the village, and selling out two years later and retiring from active business, he removed to the village of Canandaigua where he now resides. He is an official member of the Methodist Church. He married, in 1855, Esther A., daughter of John W. Paddock, now of Peoria, IL, by whom he had four children, but one surviving, Harriet C., wife of A. S. Cooley. Mrs. Reed died May 14, 1877, and he married for his second wife, May 5, 1885, F. Munnette, daughter of Warren B. Witter, and widow of E. Payson Birdseye. Mr. Reed is a member of Albert M. Murray Post G. A. R., having been a member of the One Hundred Forty-eighth Regiment N. Y. Volunteers.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

James Rees was born at Philadelphia, April 23, 1763, and died at Geneva, March 24, 1851. His wife Elizabeth Rees died March 17, 1837, aged 66 years and 3 months. James Rees commenced his clerkship about the time of the Declaration of Independence in the counting house of Willing & Morris, Philadelphia, with whom he continued until after the close of the Revolutionary War. He was soon transferred from the Commercial Department to a private desk and became the confidential clerk of Mr. Morris (Robert), and was often a witness of the interviews held between the great and patriotic financier and General Washington. When Chas. Williamson came out to this country, as agent of the Pulteney Associates, his first business was with Robert Morris, from whom the purchase of the land was made, and James Rees became one of his earliest acquaintances in this country. Mr. Rees' first visit to this region was in 1797 when he was clerk to the Commissioner for holding a treaty with the Indians at Big Tree, commonly known as the Morris Treaty, Thomas Morris, the son of Robert Morris, being the active negotiator. After returning to Philadelphia he acquired an interest in the new region and in 1798 removed his family to Geneva where, with the exception of one year at Bath in connection with the Pulteney Land Office at that place, he continued to reside until his death. It was at the time when Capt. Williamson left there that Mr. Rees moved there and took temporary charge of the Land Office, but in 1803 he resigned the position and returned to Geneva.

Mr. Rees, upon his arrival at Geneva, was employed by Capt. Williamson as an agent of the Pulteney Estate and afterwards as Mr. Williamson's private agent until he returned to England. He was the first cashier of the Bank of Geneva, Sheriff of Ontario County in 1810, was Deputy-Quartermaster of the Northern Division of the Army during the War of 1812 and ranked as Major, was one of the State Bank Commissioners in 1836-7, and at one time Postmaster of Geneva. The residence of Major Rees was on the south side of Hamilton street on the ridge of ground west of Pulteney street, the hill being known as Reed's Hill. This continued to be occupied by William S. DeZeng, Esq., and his wife, Caroline Cutbush, daughter of Major Rees, until their decease, the property being yet in the possession and occupancy of their descendants. Major Rees was one of the incorporators of the Geneva Academy and active and influential in converting the same into a College.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Reese, E. D., Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, May 20, 1846, a son of Peter, who was a son of Peter, a native of Maryland, born April 6, 1765.  After marriage the latter went to Virginia, and after three years came to Hopewell and settled.  He drove through and was obliged to cut his own road.  About twelve years later he moved on the farm now owned by Peter, jr., and died in 1854, and his wife in 1853.  Peter, jr., was born in Hopewell, November 4, 1808.  His whole life has been spent in that township, and at present resides on the old homestead aged eighty-four. His first wife was Hannah Knapp, and they had one daughter.  His second wife was Sarah Stintenburg, a native of Hyde Park, Dutchess county, and they had five children, four of whom are now living.  Subject and wife are members of the M. E. church at Clifton Springs.  His wife died October 11, 1892.  Subject was educated in Canandaigua Academy and in Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, N.Y.  He is a Republican and has been inspector of elections.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Reid, Geneva, was born in Sterlingshire, Scotland, January 1, 1855. He was educated in Scotland, where he also learned his trade, coming to the United States April 1, 1880, and locating at Troy, where he worked at the molding trade. He came to Geneva in June, 1885, entered the employ of Phillips, Clark & Co. for one year as molder. He then became foreman of that department, which position he now holds. August 4, 1886, he married Marian, daughter of Colin and Agnes Harvie, of Geneva, and they have two children: Agnes W. and Helen Mc. Mrs. Reid's father, Colin Harvie, was born in Falkirk, Sterlingshire, Scotland, in 1843, and married Agnes Cuddie, of Glasgow, Scotland. They came to Canada in 1859, and afterwards to Geneva. They had thirteen children, of whom four were born in the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Harvie live in Geneva.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William H. Reilly, Geneva, son of James and Bridget (Hughes) Reilly, was born in Hopewell October 11, 1854. At the age of nineteen he went to learn the miller's trade at Seneca Castle. In 1878 he came to Geneva, since which time he has been in the Geneva flouring mills, and in 1887 was made head miller. In 1883 he married Johanna Murphy of Geneva, and they have had five children: Alice B., Joseph (deceased), John (deceased), William and George.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Simeon Remer, Clifton Springs, was born in Newark, N. J., September 1, 1838. He received an academic education, after which he was engaged in the grocery business in Newark for five or six years. In the spring of 1857 Mr. Remer went to California and entered into wholesale mercantile transactions. In 1863 he returned to New York city where he was employed for about one year in the grocery business, after which he was connected with the Adams Express Company for about eight years. In 1872 he moved to Clifton Springs where he engaged in the produce and commission business with E. D. Copp for several years, which position he gave up to become connected with the Clifton Springs Manufacturing Company, in which he is a stockholder. In March, 1893, a co-partnership was formed by E. D. Copp and S. Remer in the grocery business. Mr. Remer was married in San Francisco, Cal., October 10, 1861, to Miss Mary Farrell of Brooklyn. They have six children, one son and five daughters. Dr. John Remer of New York city is the son. Mr. Remer's ancestors participated in the Revolutionary War and in the War of 1812. Both he and his wife are active members of the Methodist church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thadious B. Remington, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, near Centerfield, January 11, 1819.  The first ancestor of this family was the grandfather of subject, Thadious Remington, who came to this section from Vermont about 1792.  He settled on a farm on what is called Remington Hill, near Centerfield.  He was a very prominent man in the town, and was colonel of the militia regiment here and an active man in politics.  He was also a prominent Mason.  He married before coming here, Betsey Root, and they had eight children who reached adult age.  The father of the subject was the oldest son. His name was Thadious, and he was born in 1794.  He married in 1818 Rhoda, daughter of Roswell Root, a county judge who came to this section from Connecticut, and brought his parents with him; his father, Abram Root, being one of the oldest men buried in the town.  He and his son were both in the Revolution.  Thadious Remington 2d had six sons, two now living: Thomas of Michigan, and Thadious B.  The whole life of the latter has been spent in this town.  He was educated in the common schools, and has always followed farming.  He married in 1852 Maria Mack, and they had three children, two of whom are living:  Alice C., wife of Bradford Hickox; and Lydia M.  Mrs. Remington died in 1862, and he married second Anna M. Henry, of Chester, Morris county, N. J., whose family dates back to Dr. Robert Henry, of Revolutionary fame. Mr. Remington is still living at the age of seventy-three years.  Mr. Remington is one of the prominent men of this town, but has never taken an active interest in political life.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Duncan Rhind, Canandaigua, was born in Inverness, Scotland, January 14, 1851. His father was James Rhind, gardener for the McKintosh family, whose son, David, succeeded him in the same capacity. James Rhind had eight children, of whom Duncan is the oldest son. He died in 1889. Duncan Rhind was reared a gardener and first worked for James Gordon, afterwards for Mr. Ellis, M. P., at Invergarry. He afterwards went to Closburn Hall in Dumfrieshire, and then to Drumlanrig Garden, the seat of the Duke of Buceleuch, where he was second foreman. In time he went to Edinburgh, where he was engaged in garden planning. Here he perfected his education as a horticulturist and landscape gardener. In April, 1875, Mr. Rhind came to America and was first employed as foreman for Mr. Kellie at Ellerslie, on the Hudson River, the present seat of Vice-President Morton. Here he became noted as a plantsman, and after several years came to Canandaigua, and for six years was employed by F. F. Thompson. He became famous for growing large bunches of grapes. He was next employed as superintendent of Wanamaker's gardens in Philadelphia, where he made many improvements, and was also a short time with Alexander Brown of Torrysdale. In 1885 he was awarded a medal by the Horticultural Society for growing the largest bunches of foreign grapes in Pennsylvania, and in 1886 took all the first premiums given by that society and was awarded a medal. In 1887 Mr. Rhind came to Canandaigua and purchased the Cassius Sutherland farm, where he has since resided. He devotes his attention to the breeding of graded Jerseys and the raising of fruits. He married Mary Louis, a native of Rochester, by whom he has one son, Louis D., a student of Miss Gooding's private school in Canandaigua. Mr. Rhind has been a member of most of the important secret societies of this country.



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