"Pa" Surname Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


William G. Packard,
Bristol, was born January 23, 1816, in Bristol.  His father was Gooding, son of Gooding of Dighton, Mass., who came to East Bloomfield in 1804.  His son Gooding was born in Dighton in 1787, and was seventeen years old when he came to Bloomfield with his parents.  He married Adaline, daughter of Job Gooding, of Dighton, Mass., by whom he had nine children, four of whom are living.  Gooding came to Bristol when a young man and settled on the farm now owned by George Packard.  He died in 1864.  William G. was reared on a farm and educated in East Bloomfield Academy.  At twenty years of age he engaged in teaching and taught sixteen terms, spent one year in Illinois, and taught at Lockport, Ill.  In 1848 he married Cynthia, daughter of Ephraim Gooding of Bristol.  Mr. Packard and wife have two children:  William S. of Paoli, Wis., who married Mary, daughter of John Elsworth formerly of Ontario county, and they have three sons and a daughter.  Gooding was educated in Genesee Normal School.  He married Mary, daughter of Erastus Allen, and had one daughter, Mary.  William G. had 260 acres of land and is a general farmer and hop grower.  He is a Republican and was supervisor two years, also was at one time school inspector.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Harvey Paddleford, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, January 6, 1831. The earliest ancestor of the family in this country was Jonathan, born about 1828, and generally supposed to have been one of the Pilgrim Fathers. He married Mary, daughter of John Brandford, of Sudbury, Mass., and settled at Cambridge, Mass. They had five children, of whom Jonathan was born in 1656, married Hannah Flint, and died in 1710. Their only child, Jonathan, was born in 1679, and died in 1747. By his wife, Hannah, he had ten children. Zachariah, the second son, was born in 1710, married Martha Allen, and died in 1765. They had eight children. The oldest son, Zachariah, was born in 1733, married Rachael Reynolds, and died in 1803. They also had eight children. Joseph, the third son and grandfather of our subject, was born in 1764 in Taunton, Mass. He married Betsey Harvey, born in 1765, and they had six daughters and three sons, of whom Zachariah, the second son, was born in East Taunton, Mass., March 18, 1800, and married Susannah, daughter of Zachariah Tiffany, and they had four children. Harvey was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy. He was assigned the 111 acres of the old homestead farm, and after his father's death thirty acres were added to this, on which Mr. Paddleford has erected a residence, barns, store house, etc., and a railroad station. May 22, 1861, he enlisted in the Twenty-eighth N. Y. Vols., and saw service with them at Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and many minor engagements. He was mustered out at the expiration of his term, June 3, 1863, as first lieutenant, having been in command of the company for a year. He returned to Canandaigua, and was then appointed recruiting agent of the county to fill the quota of the various calls until 1865. He not only did a faithful work in this county, but assisted other counties. At the close of the war he returned to farm duties, and in 1876 was appointed station agent at Paddleford's, and in 1874 was appointed postmaster under General Grant. In 1873 he was appointed United States loan commissioner for Ontario county. He was president of the County Agricultural Society, and chairman of the Republican County Committee a number of years. He married in 1852 Margaret, daughter of Col. William Case, a farmer and assistant superintendent of the Rochester and Auburn Railroad, and they had four children, two of them living: Alfred Harvey, foreman of the New York Central freight house at Suspension Bridge; and Dudley Donnelly, the other son, is his assistant. The oldest son, William H., was killed by a sheep when he was but four years old. The other son, Edward, died at four years of age. Mrs. Paddleford died in 1876, and he married in 1879 Florence Doubleday, of Farmington.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Daniel L. Paddock,
Gorham, was born in Jerusalem, Yates county, July 31, 1849.  His father was William G., a son of Philip, a native of Yonkers, who early came to Rochester and followed lumbering.  About 1834 he settled in the west part of Jerusalem.  He married Lydia Gildersleeve of Scipio, Cayuga county, and had seven sons and four daughters.  He died in 1859, and his wife in 1869.  William G. was born in Rochester, January 9, 1818.  He attended the city schools until nine years of age, when he was bound out to his uncle, Frederick Gildersleeve, until twenty years of age.  He married a Sallie Simms of Pultney, Steuben county, born in September, 1820, by whom he had five sons and three daughters, all now living.  Since twenty-one years of age Mr. Paddock has resided in Jerusalem.  In early life he was a lumberman, but is now one of the prominent farmers of his county, owning 270 acres.  Daniel L. was educated in Prattsburg Academy.  When twenty-one years of age he went to Michigan and followed lumbering two years, then returned to Yates county where he worked at carpentry for twelve years.  In 1886 he married Annie McMichael of Prattsburg, born April 4, 1850.  In 1886 Mr. Paddock purchased the George W. Washburn homestead of 130 acres.  He is a Republican and has been highway commissioner.  The parents of Mrs. Paddock are Alexander and Mary A. (Risdel) McMichael, he a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and she of Yorkshire, England.  They came to America when children with their parents.  They have four sons and three daughters.  Mr. McMichael is one of the largest farmers of Prattsburg.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Olney T. Padelford, Canandaigua, was born on his present residence in Canandaigua, July 14, 1837. His father, Zachariah, was born in East Taunton, Mass., March 18, 1800, and died March 1, 1887, a moulder by trade. When twenty-one years of age he came to Western New York, working near Batavia and also in Gorham, but returned to Massachusetts. In 1824 he settled permanently in Canandaigua, working in the furnaces at Wolcott, Ontario and Manchester during the winters, and farming summers. He gradually increased his possessions until at one time he owned in one block 280 acres. He was a Republican, and when the Auburn division of the New York Central Railroad was built, Mr. Padelford established a wood yard here and furnished the company with wood, and it was from this the station was named Padelford. He married in this town Susan, (died August 13, 1860), daughter of Zachariah Tiffany, of Canandaigua, and they had four children: Harvey, of Padelford Station; Mary, who died aged four years; Edmund, who died aged two years; and Olney T. The latter was seventeen years old when he went to Shortsville to learn the machinist's trade; he also followed pattern-making, and has been employed in various places. In Oil City and West Virginia he was engaged in the oil business. He is a Democrat. He and his family are members of the Presbyterian Church in Canandaigua, and he is a Mason of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294. He married in 1860 Catherine, daughter of  John P. and Elizabeth (Nagles) Scherrer, and they have had three children: Alburtus Leander, who lives on the homestead with his father; Charles Eugene, who conducts a jewelry store in Victor; and Z. Sherman, who was drowned in a pond in Canandaigua in his fifth year. In 1867 Mr. Padelford established a tile manufactory in Canandaigua, which he conducted three years, and in 1870 returned to the old homestead farm, where he has ever since lived.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Page, Charles Augustus, Geneva, was born in Orange county, September 2, 1817, and from there went to the town of Geneva and engaged in farming. In 1861 he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred Forty-eighth Regiment N.Y.S. Vols. and served three years; and although never wounded in the battle, the close of the war found him in broken health. Returning from the South Mr. Page sold his farm in Geneva, and purchased another on the east side of the lake, but after three years there he came to Geneva village where he died August 22, 1891. His wife was Margaret Ansley, by whom he had six children:  Newton, of Geneva; John, who died while young; Helen S., who married Andrew J. Eshenour, the latter a successful business man, and who died in 1890; Louisa, who became the wife of Louis P. Barger; Mary, who married W. P. Moses; and Margaret.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


E. Ransom Page,
Canandaigua, was born in Bethany, Genesee county, June 2, 1834, a son of Abel W. and Marian (Ransom) Page.  The great-great-grandfather, Nathaniel, was born in New Hampshire in 1710, and had thirteen children, of whom Samuel was born in New Hampshire in 1747, and was the father of eleven children.  Of these John, the grandfather of subject, was born December 2, 1776, and came to Vermont, where he married Phoebe, daughter of Nathan Whipple, and they had two children, Abel W. and Juliette.  Abel W., father of E. R., was born in Vermont in 1805, and when six years of age came with his parents to Genesee county, where he died in 1864.  He had ten children, of whom seven survive.  The early life of E. Ransom was spent on the farm in Genesee county, where he remained until he was about twenty-one years of age.  He was educated in Bethany Academy, and his first business venture was as a commercial traveler in the book trade for about four years.  In 1860 he went to Illinois where he spent ten years in the sheep business, after which he returned to this State and 1870 came to Canandaigua and engaged in the insurance business.  In May, 1872, he formed a copartnership with Major A. C. Richardson, and they bought out DeVol & Couch, insurance men, and conducted a very successful business.  In 1873, Mr. Page bought out the interest of his partner and conducted the business alone.  January 1, 1878, he sold out his fire insurance business to George Couch, and spent four years in Auburn in life insurance.  In 1883, Mr. Page returned to Canandaigua and opened a general insurance agency, under the firm name of Page & Henry.  In 1885 the firm became Page, Henry & Benham, and in 1889 Mr. Benham disposed of his interest to Henry S. Hubbell, and the firm has since been Page, Henry & Hubbell, real estate and insurance agents.  Mr. Page married in 1864 Lucy A., a daughter of Joel S. Paige, M. D., a prominent physician of Owego, N. Y.  They had one child, Julia, who lives with her parents.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Levi A. Page, Seneca, was born on the homestead near Seneca Castle, January 1, 1841. He was educated in the public schools and Lima Seminary, and has always followed farming. Mr. Page has been one of the assessors of the town six years, was elected supervisor in 1882, serving eight consecutive years, was chairman of the board two years, and was elected one of the superintendents of the county poor in the fall of 1891, serving in that capacity still. February 19, 1867, he married Maggie F., daughter of John H. Benham of Hopewell, and they had seven children: Clara J., Laura S., Mary F., John A., Frank M., Levi A., jr., and Jessie B. Mrs. Page died in February, 1886. Mr. Page's father, Levi A., was born here October 6, 1816. He was educated in the schools of his day and in Cazenovia Seminary, and was a farmer. He married Deborah, daughter of Thomas Ottley of this town. They had three children: Levi A., Joel and Harriet J. Mrs. Page died in August, 1850. For his second wife he married Mary Winters of Seneca. Mr. Page died in 1865; his wife resides with her son, Levi A. His grandfather, Nathaniel Page, came here from Conway, Mass., in 1812.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Edward H. Palmer, organizer of the Empire Gas and Electric Company, and for many years its head, was born in Clinton, Iowa, in 1855. He attended Cornell University, graduating in 1877. A short time later he was admitted to the bar in Michigan and came to Geneva in 1883. He became successfully interested in several industries here and in 1901 purchased the Geneva Gas Company, his first venture in the utility field. Other companies serving nearby towns were acquired from time to time until the Empire Gas and Electric Company, which he founded by consolidating these companies, served a total population in excess of 100,000. The company was organized in 1911 as a stock company and continued as such until 1925, with Mr. Palmer as president and executive manager. At that time it was sold to the Ellis L. Phillips interests of New York. Mr. Palmer remained chairman of board of directors until 1928, when he retired from active business life. Mr. Palmer was for many years one of Geneva's leading business men. He was one of the founders and directors of the Utilities Mutual Insurance Company and was well known in local banking circles, having been president of the National Bank of Geneva and a director of the Geneva Trust Company. Mr. Palmer died in Albany May 20, 1931.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Henry Oliver Palmer was born at Geneva on August 25, 1884, the son of Edward H. and Cornelia Rouse Palmer. He was educated at Geneva High School, Cheltenham Military Academy and at Hobart College and Cornell University, graduating with an M. E. degree from Cornell. Mr. Palmer entered the employ of the Empire Coke Company in 1907 and from 1909 to 1912 was superintendent. In 1912 he became vice president of the Empire Gas & Electric Company, a position he held until 1919, when he became vice president and general manager. He is now group manager of the Associated Gas & Electric Company. Mr. Palmer is a member of the Congressional Country Club of Washington, D. C., the Lakeside and Geneva Country Clubs and the Cornell Club of New York. He is a member of Trinity Episcopal church. Mr. Palmer is a commissioner of the Finger Lakes State Parks Commission. He is also a trustee of Hobart College, trustee of Clifton Springs Sanitarium and vestryman and treasurer of Trinity church. On June 3, 1908, he married Minna C. Gauntlett at Ithaca. They have four children, Mary C., Jane, Cornelia and Henry O. Palmer, Jr.



From Victor Herald 20  April 1900

Dr. J. W. Palmer was born in Hancock, Mass., in the year 1806. He was a lineal descendant of Walter Palmer, who came from England and settled at Stonington, Conn., at a very early day. He studied medicine at the Berkshire Medical College at Pittsfield, and commenced the practice of his profession at that place as a partner with Dr. Childs. He removed to Lanesboro, Berkshire county, in 1833, and soon after married Mary M. Osborne, sister of D. H. Osborne, of this village. He practiced medicine in various places until he came to Victor in 1848, spending the remainder of his life in this place. Dr. Palmer was always considered a skillful physician and surgeon, a close and accurate diagnoser, and his opinion was much sought after in blind and difficult cases, and usually found to be correct. He was an ardent advocate of higher education for the young, and spared no pains or privation to give his children the best advantages he could afford. He was a member of the County Medical Society, in whose councils and meetings he was often a central figure. He had four children, Henry D. Palmer, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church at Penn Yan; John O., first a merchant at Canton, Ohio, who afterwards studied for the medical profession; Elizabeth, for many years a teacher in Rochester, and Frederick W., who was first a teacher in the Penn Yan academy, afterwards taking a course in the Theological Seminary at Auburn, and is now an ordained clergyman. Dr. Palmer died at his home in this village, April 11, 1882, at the age of 76 years.



From Victor Herald 20  April 1900

Henry Pardee was born in Sharon, Connecticut, September 23, 1796, and came with his parents to the town of Victor in 1802. His father, Silas Pardee, purchased a farm about a mile east from Victor village, owned a few years since by George A. Adams, Helen M. Lane being the present owner. When Henry was sixteen years of age he enlisted in the war of 1812. He was sent to Buffalo, where he was wounded in the arm by a musket ball, and was taken prisoner at the time the town was burned by the British troops, being afterwards exchanged, returning to his home in Victor. He secured a good education in the public schools, and, upon reaching manhood his ability and intelligence were recognized by his townsmen, and he was many times elected to fill important offices, holding that of justice of the peace for many years, and was generally known as Esquire Pardee. He was elected four terms to represent his district in the Assembly at Albany, and looked faithfully and well after the interests of his constituents. Mr. Pardee was careful in preserving a file of his business correspondence during his service as Assemblyman, and it is interesting to note some of the requests for his influence.  One man objected to the law by which Webster's dictionary was to be introduced in all schools in the state, claiming that it was a scheme in the interest of the publishers of the work, Messrs. Merriman, of Springfield, Mass., which would throw several thousand dollars of New York school monies in the hands of these rich publishers in Massachusetts. Another protests against the free school law, "because it works bad in the Rural Districts, some of them being nearly destroyed, and many others, where was peace and harmony before the passage of the law, now is wrangling, discord and strife." Another objection was that the free school law made paupers of the children by educating them at public expense. We hope this writer lived long enough to see and realize the benefits resulting from the free school law, by the advancement in all lines of educational work since his letter of protest in 1851. Another writer from Allen's Hill, in 1851, enters a protest against the establishment of an agricultural college at the expense of the taxpayers, and thought the best "experimental farm," for the education of young farmers, was the "home farm." This writer also advocates the repeal of the "odious free school law,: as being pernicious in character, and wrong in principle. He says, "admit this principle once, and where will you stop? If children are to be educated by the state, why not clothe and feed them from the same public crib? Whither will such agrarian fanaticism lead us? It is a legislative system of pillage and robbery." These writers evidently had taxes to pay with no children to be benefited. The world has moved since 1851. Mr. Pardee was married three times. His first wife was Mary Ann Morford, who died in 1826, leaving three children, Helen Jane, Ann Finley and Abigal C. His second wife was Susan F. Morford, sister of his first wife, who died in 1842, leaving three children, Mary E., Henry Harrison and Amelia Francis. His third wife was Diana Wilmarth Richardson, who died in 1847, leaving one child, Alice Diana. In politics Mr. Pardee was what was called an old line Whig, and upon the organization of the Republican party, he became an ardent advocate of its principles and purposes, and was considered one of the strong men of the town, acting with vigor in whatever he was interested in. He died June 15, 1862, about a year after the civil war commenced. As might be expected, he was found heartily sustaining the integrity of the Union up to the time of his death.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John Pardee was one of a family of thirteen children, there being twelve sons and one daughter, each son thereby having a sister, who came to this country with their parents among the earliest settlers. After various trials, the family became scattered, and John moved to Sharon, Conn., where he bought 300 acres of land of John Darby, paying therefore 100 pounds, on the 15th day of December, 1769, in the ninth year of the reign of King George the Third. He died about the year 1788, leaving six children: Jesse, Silas, Hannah, John, Abigail Pardee Newell and Sarah Pardee Wood, Silas Pardee, born in the year 1754, moved to Victor, then called Bloomfield, about the year 1802. He was a Revolutionary soldier, with his brother, Jesse, and they shared the hardships of the terrible winter at Valley Forge. He married Abigail Pettit, daughter of Jonathan Pettit. He died May 31, 1833, leaving three children: Abbie, Henry, and Rachael Pardee Rogers. Henry Pardee was born at Sharon, Conn., September 23, 1796, came to Victor with his parents, and settled on a farm east of the village, on what was known as the Stage Route. When he was sixteen years of age he enlisted in the War of 1812; was wounded in the arm by a musket ball and was taken prisoner at the burning of Buffalo; returned to his home in Victor, and was elected four terms to represent his district in the Assembly. He was a justice of the peace for a good many years. He was married three times; his first wife being Mary Ann Morford, and Amelia Frances, who died December 28, 1826, leaving three children: Helen Jane, Ann Finley, and Abigail C. His second wife was Susan F. Morford, she being sister to his first wife; she died April 19, 1842, leaving three children: Mary E., Henry Harrison, and Amelia Frances. His third wife was Diana Wilmarth Richardson; she died May 16, 1847, leaving one child, Alice Diana, a twin brother, Henry Seymour, having died before its mother. Henry Pardee died June 15, 1862. Helen Jane Pardee married Charles Fisher. Abigail C. married W. W. Arnold. Amelia Frances married William Blackmore, of Rochester; she died in the year 1887, leaving two sons, William and Charles D. Ann Finley Pardee died March 9, 1893. Alice D. Pardee died July 3, 1873, at Indianapolis, Ind., where she was being cured of lameness that had afflicted her since childhood.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Myron Park, Canandaigua, son of Joel and Lydia Park, was born in East Bloomfield, January 24, 1812. He had a good education in the common schools, and when seventeen years of age he lived with his uncle for one year, then learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked for eight years. He then bought a farm in Bristol, and after spending two years there sold out and bought a farm in East Bloomfield, where he spent two years. In 1841 he came to Canandaigua and bought a farm of 174 acres on lot fourteen, where he spent the balance of his life. Mr. Park always took an active interest in all good works, was charitable and liberal, and respected by all who knew him. In politics he was a Republican, and in religions a Protestant, having been a member of the Baptist Church about forty years. He married, February 8, 1835, Hannah B., daughter of John Harvey Wheeler, of East Bloomfield, and they had four children: Myron Alonzo died September 23, 1878, aged thirty-seven years; Henry O., a farmer of Canandaigua; Mary U. and Ellen M., who conduct the homestead farm. Myron Park died March 26, 1879.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

E. W. Parker, Hopewell, was born in Jacksonville, Steuben county, August 19, 1838, a son of Samuel, who was a son of Samuel who came from Luzerne, Pa., in an early day and settled in Livingston county, where he spent the remainder of his life. His wife was Martha Parker, and they had four daughters and four sons, three of the latter being Methodist clergymen. Samuel, jr., was born December 16, 1797, in Luzerne, Pa. He married Mersett S. Fowler, of Livingston county, born April 7, 1810, and they had two children, Robert and Samuel. In 1833 Mrs. Parker died, and in 1834 he married Lois Winters, born in Schuyler county, in 1805, and to them were born three sons and one daughter. Mr. Parker was a minister in the M. E. church. He preached in Livingston and Ontario counties, and was at one time stationed at Elmira. In 1840 he located on the farm now owned by the subject, where he died in 1879 and his wife in 1887. Subject was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and in 1865 married Kate E. Lewis, a native of Hopewell born 1841, a daughter of Nathaniel B. and Wealthy A. Lewis. The father of Nathaniel B. was Nathaniel, a native of Connecticut, who early came to Hopewell where he died. He was one of the founders of the M. E. church, and gave the Emery Chapel its name. He died about 1857. Nathaniel B. was born in Hopewell. His wife was Catherine Smith, by whom he had two sons and two daughters. He was assessor a number of years, and also commissioner. He died in Hopewell May 2, 1867, and his wife died October 23, 1883. Subject has had two children: Annie L., born January 27, 1873, and died June 22, 1892, and Charles H., born October 26, 1883. Mr. Parker is a Republican.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Edgar Parker, for many years owner and editor of The Geneva Advertiser-Gazette, a leading Democratic newspaper, was the son of Giles Parker and was born October 21, 1837, at the house, No. 322 Castle street, in which he lived his entire life. He was educated in the Geneva public schools and as a young man went, in March, 1855, to assist his brother-in-law in clearing land in Michigan. Here he contracted malaria and in impaired health, he returned to Geneva early in November of the same year. He at once began an apprenticeship in the office of The Geneva Gazette, which at that time was conducted by his brother, Stephen H. He finished his apprenticeship April 1, 1859, and became foreman of the office, continuing in that capacity until May 1, 1862, when he leased The Gazette and its plant from his brother and conducted the business for four years. Upon the termination of the lease of The Gazette on May 11, 1866, Edgar Parker became superintendent and local editor for his brother. This relation continued for fourteen years, at the end of which time Mr. Parker decided to establish a paper of his own which he called the Geneva Advertiser, and the initial number appeared on December 31, 1880.

On November 25, 1901, Stephen H. Parker died suddenly and Edgar Parker merged his paper with his brother's Gazette and called it The Advertiser-Gazette. The merger was announced on March 11, 1902. Mr. Parker continued as editor and publisher of The Advertiser-Gazette until his death on Nov. 27, 1914. Mr. Parker was married on July 21, 1860, to Sarah R. Furman, third daughter of Amasa Furman of Ovid. They had one son, Harry E. Parker, and two daughters, Mrs. Fred C. Kent and Mrs. David C. Reed.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Parker, J. Albert, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, August 7, 1851, a son of John Parker, a gardener of this town, who was born in England, and came to this country in 1850. He located in Canandaigua where he lived until his death in 1881.  He had five children, four of whom are living.  He was educated in the common schools, and on leaving school he went into the store of A. S. Newman. Mr. And Mrs. Parker are members of St. John's Episcopal church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

J. W. Parker, Manchester, was born in the village of Pike, Wyoming county, January 23, 1835.  He received an academic education, after which he taught school for several years.  In 1860 he came to Port Gibson, where he taught school for one year, which he gave up to enter into the mercantile trade, which he has since most successfully conducted; also conducted the Crystal Springs Creamery.  Mr. Parker was appointed postmaster under Grant, which office he has since held, with the exception of the Cleveland administration.  He has been justice of the peace 22 years, and justice of session four terms.  He married Emma, daughter of Hon. H. Schutt; they have one child, a daughter, Ada B. Parker, Ph. B., member of the faculty of the State Normal School, Mansfield, Pa.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Parmele, Hiram Taft, Canandaigua, was born in West Bloomfield in 1831, a son of Isaac, born in Connecticut in 1799, who moved to Ontario county when a child, his father, Reuben, settling on a farm where Isaac and five other children were raised.  The old homestead farm is in the possession of a descendant of the family. Isaac, the second son, always lived in East Bloomfield, where he died in 1886. He married Laura, daughter of Ebenezer Leach of Lima, and they had six children, of whom four are living. Hiram T. was the oldest son.  He was educated in the common schools and at private schools at Honeoye Falls and Bloomfield. After leaving school he followed farming a few years, and then engaged as a clerk in a store at East Mendon. In 1852 he opened a store in Honeoye Falls, which he conducted for three years, then went into business in West Bloomfield, where he conducted a general store until 1871. In 1873 he came to Canandaigua, and went into the milling business at Chapinville, where he owned the flouring mill for six years. In 1882 he went to Victor and opened a bank, the firm being Parmele, Hamlin & Co. December 1, 1887, he established the Canandaigua National Bank at Canandaigua, and has ever since been a member of the board of directors, and has held the office of cashier. Mr. Parmele has always been an ardent supporter of the Republican party, and has held numerous offices of honor and trust. In 1866 he was elected supervisor of West Bloomfield, and re-elected for four successive terms, during his last term serving as chairman of the Board of Supervisors. Mr. Parmele married in 1856 Mary, daughter of Melancton Gates of West Bloomfield, and they had four children:  Laura, wife of  J. H. Johnson, a lawyer of Penn Yan; Henry, a banker of East Bloomfield; George , a lawyer of Rochester; and Mary, a student of Vassar College.



From Ontario County Journal 26 February 1909

Bristol Springs, N. Y. - In the Parmele cemetery in this town is buried the Rev. James Parmele, born Nov. 19, 1757, died July 9, 1842, in South Bristol. He served more than three years in Washington's army and was overcome by the heat at the battle of Monmouth in June, 1778, and was a partial invalid for life. In 1818 he was granted a pension, but in the next congress pensions were granted only to dependent soldiers, so his was cut off. He was paid in Continental script and being of a thrifty disposition, saved it till it became utterly worthless at the end of the war. This remains an honest debt, due to Revolutionary descendants from the government that will never be paid, writes his daughter in 1907, in the genealogical record of the Parmele family. His daughter, Mrs. Simon Collins, is still living at Bridgeport, Conn. Her nephews, Daniel P. Allen and Collector Charles S. Allen, live in the Bristol Hollow, just north of the Brown stand school house. Mr. Parmele's son, Col. James Parmele, is well remembered by many now living here and Mrs. Collins is remembered for being one of the tallest ladies born in this town as well as for her ability as a teacher and literary talent.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

G. Herbert Parmelee,
Phelps, was born in Addison, Steuben county, July 27, 1854, one of three children of Rev. Anson Hall and Mary E. (Whiting) Parmelee.  Rev. Anson Hall Parmelee was born in Bristol, Vt., September 14, 1810, was a graduate of Middlebury College in 1839, entered Andover Theological Seminary the same year, was licensed to preach in September, 1842.  After three years' service as general agent of the American Tract Society for the establishment of colportage in North and South Carolina and Georgia, he entered upon pastoral duties in the State of New York where he labored about thirty years in the towns of Addison, Livonia and Seneca Castle.  The Vermont Parmelees were originally from Connecticut.  G. Herbert Parmelee married, November 23, 1881, Lillian May Pond of Phelps, daughter of George and Ann (Hurd) Pond; they have four children:  George P., John B., Grace L., and Louis Whiting Parmelee.  At the decease of George Pond in 1889, the L. P. Thompson Plow Company's property in Phelps came into his possession, which has been noted as producing the first iron Beam and first chilled plow manufactured in the State.  Mr. Parmelee has developed the plant until it now produces thirteen different styles of plows which are considered first class.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. John Parmenter, now president of the Geneva Savings Bank, was born in Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada, January 25, 1862. His parents shortly afterwards removed to Buffalo, where he was educated in the public schools, Central High School and later in the University of Buffalo from the Medical Department, of which he was graduated in 1883. He practiced medicine and surgery in Buffalo until 1905, when he purchased the old Snell farm southwest of Geneva, changing the name to High Acres. After a time Dr. Parmenter sold the farm and came into the city to live where he was drawn into various business interests and eventually became head of the Savings Bank which position he still occupies.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

William E. Parr, son of John Parr (deceased) was born in Lyons, Wayne county, October 18, 1875. Came to Naples when two years old, where he has since resided. He attended school at the academy, and his occupation was grape culture. He worked at carpentry several years. He lives on Mount Pleasant street with his mother and two sisters in a Queen Anne cottage of unique architecture, which he designed and constructed himself. He is now employed at the Middlesex Valley railroad station.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Edward R. Parrish, Naples, second son of Jeremiah B. and Clarissa (Clark) Parrish, was born in Naples, December 6, 1818.  He was one of seven children:  Mary, Bishop, Emily, Edwin R., William, Caroline, and Gordin.  Mr. Parrish was educated at the select school of Naples, and has always been a farmer.  He is largely interested in sheep-breeding and the growing of wheat, and has always been a hard worker.  He takes a great interest in the advancement of his town, and was one of the founders of Naples Academy.  He married Susan Matilda Parkhurst of Fairfield.  She was a most amiable woman, noted for her social qualities and earnest church work.  They had four children:  W. Scott, Rozelle, Schuyler J. and Emily.  Mr. Parrish's great-grandfather, Samuel Parrish, was the first settler in Naples, and came from Norwich, Conn., in 1789, some months previous to any of the other pioneers.  Schuyler J., the second son of Edwin R., was born in Naples August 17, 1844, was educated at the academy in Naples and at Eastman's Business College in Poughkeepsie.  Returning to Naples he engaged in business with his father at farming and the buying and selling of wool, produce and stock.  He has had dealings with nearly every one in this section, and in addition to the management of the farm of over 1,200 acres he has been largely interested in the wool and sheep trade.  The town was always assured of the hearty cooperation and financial influence of Mr. Parrish.  Mr. Parrish was a trustee of the Presbyterian society and an active member of the church.  He married Martha Connaughty of Naples.  July 13, 1892, he died, leaving a wife and five children, two having died in infancy.  His father, Edwin R. Parrish, survives him, also one brother, W. Scott of Canandaigua, and a sister, Mrs. T. H. Williams of Washington, D. C.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Winfield Scott Parrish, Canandaigua, was born in Naples, January 24, 1842. The grandfather, Jeremiah B., was a descendant of the Parrishes of Revolutionary fame, and was himself a captain of volunteers in the War of 1812, and was in the battle of Lundy's Lane. He settled in Naples, following farming and practicing law. He was at one time associate justice of this county, and was for many years supervisor of Naples. He married Clara C. Clark, an aunt of Gov. Myron H. Clark, and they had seven children: Bishop, Edwin R., William W., Gordon C., Emily, Mary and Caroline. Edwin R., father of our subject, was born in Naples in November, 1818. He married in 1840 Matilda S. Parkhurst, of Fairfield, Herkimer county, and they had four children, two of whom are living: Rozelle F., who died when but thirteen years of age; Schuyler J., who conducted the homestead farm at Naples, died July 13, 1892, aged forty-eight years; Emma L. married Thomas H. Williams, a physician of Washington, D. C.; and W. Scott. The latter was educated at Naples and Fairfield Academies and Poughkeepsie Business College. When twenty-nine years of age he went to Illinois and spent two and one-half years, then settled on a farm of 270 acres in Canandaigua, which he has ever since conducted. He married, June 5, 1872, Emma Basford, of Kankakee, Ill., and they have had three children: Mary E., William Howard and James Basford.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Percival J. Parrott came to Geneva in 1900 to become a chief entomologist at the Experiment Station, a position which he has held continuously since, and was made vice director in 1929. He was born in Croydon, England, and came to America with his parents and a large family of brothers and sisters, who settled in Kansas, where he received his early education. After leaving the Kansas State University he entered Cornell University at Ithaca and after his graduation returned to Kansas, where he became assistant entomologist at the University, where he had already obtained the degree of A. B. He has become a member of a score of educational groups during his career and his knowledge of insect pests is so well known that when the invasion of the Mediterranean fruit fly was reported in Florida he was selected by the Secretary of Agriculture at Washington to go to the southern state and take full charge of the methods of control. Staying in the southland for six months during the harvesting of the crop proper control measures were worked out so that the following season there was no difficulty reported from the invasions of the pest. He received a medal for his entomological exhibit at the Pan American exhibition and is the author of several books on the insects that are prevalent in New York State. Locally he is well known among the organizations, being a member of Ark Lodge, the Rod & Gun Club, Rotary, University and Geneva Country Clubs. He is a member of North Presbyterian Church. He married Florence Mildred Hubbard of Geneva who died in 1929 leaving two children, John and Margaret, who live with their father.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Parsons, William W., Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, May 22, 1863, a son of H. W. Parsons, a farmer of that town. The great-grandfather, William, came to this section from Connecticut, and his son Hiram lived in Bristol on the farm settled by his father. He had one child, Hiram W., who lived on the homestead, where he was born in 1840. He married in 1862 Sarah M. Wheaton of Birstok, and they have two children:  Ernest D., a clerk in his brother's store, and William W. The early life of the latter was spent on the farm at Bristol. He was educated at the Union School and Lima Business College, and in 1884 opened a store in partnership with S. P. Hall on Bristol street, which lasted on year; then the firm was Parsons Bros. For two years and Wheaton & Parsons for three years. In January, 1891, he became sole owner of the business. In the spring of 1892 he moved in to his new store on Main street, which has been refitted for him. This has three floors for trade and basement for reserve stock. He carries a full line of groceries and provisions and the fall of 1892 he added the furniture department. He married, January 20, 1887, Minne A. Francis of Bristol. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge, No. 204 F. & A. M., and Kanandaigua Lodge, No. 245, K. of  P.



From Ontario County Journal 31 December 1886; News from Reed's Corners;

Mrs. Alice Partise is proprietor of the Reed's Corners Hotel. Her husband, Geo. Partise, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1819. He came to this country when but two years old. He married Miss Alice Lynagh, and resided for a number of years in the town of Benton, Yates county. In 1869 he purchased the hotel property of David Southerland, and was the proprietor until the time of his death in 1875. Since that time Mrs. Alice Partise, the widow, assisted by her brother, Nicholas Lynagh, has kept the property as a hotel, and endeavors to make it an accommodating place for the comfort of the public.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Wilson Howell Patterson, Richmond, was born in Newark, Wayne county, October 13, 1850.  His father, George, a native of County Fermaunagh, Ireland, was born July 28, 1812.  He emigrated to this country with his father, Daniel, in 1823.  George followed shoemaking for several years, then engaged in farming.  He came first to Livingston county, and then to Richmond in 1867, and settled where his son Wilson now resides.  He married Elizabeth Carrier, of Colerain, Mass., who was born in 1815.  They had seven children: Sarah Jane, James Henry, Margaret E., Wilson H., George H. (deceased), Mary Ellen, George Edward.  Mr. Patterson died in 1872, aged sixty years, and his wife in 1882, aged sixty-seven years.  Wilson H. was educated at Newark Union Free School and Academy.  He married in 1874, Gertrude E. Allen, of Calhoun county, Mich., daughter of Almond and Lucy Ann (Powell) Allen.  They have five children: Frank A., born August 14, 1878; Robert M., born March 8, 1882; Elizabeth G., born April 16, 1885; Lyra Carson, born September 27, 1890; and Glenn Wilson, born February 6, 1893.  Mrs. Patterson's father was born in Albany and her mother in Livonia, Livingston county.  Mr. Patterson's farm consists of 160 acres, and he makes hay a specialty.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Paul, Charles R., Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua in 1850, a son of F. W. Paul, a railroad contractor and at one time president of the Niagara Falls Division of the Erie Railroad. He was born in Scotland in 1813 and came to this country a young man, locating in Canandaigua. He was always interested in railroad construction and had contracts on the Erie, Flint and Pere Marquette at Saginaw and others. He died here in 1865, leaving six children, four of whom survive. The only son of the family in business in this town is our subject. He was educated in Canandaigua Academy, under Professor Clarke, and after leaving school acted as clerk in his brother's drug store, and in 1874 became a partner. At his brother's death in 1889 he became sole proprietor, and is now conducting the oldest drug store in town, it having been in existence since the town was first started. In 1876 Mr. Paul married Mary A., daughter of Thomas Blanchard, a native of England, who conducted a market here. Mr. Paul is a member of the Board of Health; of the A. O. U. W.; of the Mutual Accident Association; and the Empire Knights of Relief. Mr. and Mrs. Paul are members of St. John's Episcopal church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

D. H. Patty, Geneva, was born in Auburn, February 21, 1851, and in 1869 came to Geneva and kept books for Graves, Selover & Willard, where he remained ten years.  In 1879 he commenced business for himself, and now has seventy acres of nursery and orchard, employs from twenty-five to fifty men, and besides this keeps from 100 to 150 men on the road selling trees.  He has two branch offices, and does a business of about $75,000 per year.  In 1883 he married Helen A., daughter of William Scoon, and has one child, Laura, born in 1884.   
 

From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Pavlak, Victor, Geneva, was born in the province of Passen, Germany, October 10, 1850. He was educated in their schools and came to the United States in 1871, locating in Geneva. He visited his former home on one occasion. He has always worked at the nursery business since in his adopted country, and formed a co-partnership with William Sisson in 1885, which continued until the death of Mr. Sisson in 1892 since which time he has had full charge of the business, in fact he has always been its manager. He has about fifteen acres with all varieties of the best stock, and conducts the same on honest business principles.  November 12, 1884, he married Mary L. Sisson of Geneva, and they have two children:  Mary K. and William J. Mrs. Pavlak's father, William Sisson, was born in Yorkshire, England, June 4, 1819, and came to the United States about 1840, locating in Vermont, but coming to Geneva the following year. He married Bridget Lyman and they had five children:  William, one who died in infancy; George L., Mary, and Francis, who died when a year old.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Payne, Geneva, was born in Norfolk, England, in 1829, came to the United States in 1854, and married Sarah Fenn, of his native place.  They had six children: Elizabeth, Caroline, Sarah, Mary, Thursa B., and George A.  The latter is a farmer with his father.  He married Anna A. Bluntt, and they have one son, James D.  Thursa B. married Westley Hobson, and has one daughter, Mildred A.; Mary married George Rennyson, and died leaving two children, Ashley and Byron.  Sarah has been married twice, first to Jordan Brezee, by whom she had four children: Belle, Nancy, George, and Elizabeth.  For her second husband she married George Halladay, and has three children: Nellie, Charles, and Hattie.  Caroline married Clark Fowler, and has one son, Harry P.  Elizabeth has been married twice, first to William McCoy, and they had a son, Charles.  For her second husband she married James Pierce, and has one son, Frederick.  Mrs. Payne died in 1881, mourned by a bereaved husband and children and a host of friends.  



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The late George Payne, Farmington, was born in Farmington, east of the homestead, September 28, 1809. He was educated in the district schools and was a farmer. July 2, 1834, he married Nancy Jane, daughter of William and Martha Brown of his native town, and had seven children: Gideon, who died March 2, 1880; Andrew G., who married Cynthia Christie, of Mayfield, Fulton county, and is a farmer; Martha L., who married David Padgham; Phebe L., who married John Corrigan, and resides in Canada; Hannah L., who married Walter D. Norton, of Victor; one died in infancy; and Florence L., who resides with her mother at the homestead. Mr. Payne died July 22, 1847. His father, Gideon, was born January 10, 1765, in Berkshire, Mass. February 18, 1793, he married Phebe Hill of his native place, and at once came to Farmington, one of the first settlers in the town. His ancestry has been traced back to 1590, and some of the family to 1060. The name originated in Normandy, and the first ancestor, Hugh De Payen, was a son of the page who went to England with William the Conqueror. Elizabeth Payne, the mother of Oliver Cromwell, was a daughter of one of the ancestors. Hugh de Payen was one of the leaders of the first crusade. He established the Order of Templars in England in A. D. 1118. This order was the most powerful and wealthy in Europe for three centuries. Mrs. Payne's father, William Brown, was born February 28, 1778, in Cumberland, RI, and came to this place at an early day. He married Martha Hill, of Swansea, RI, in Farmington, October 27, 1805, and had four children: Chloe, Hannah M., Nancy Jane, and Levi A. Chloe died when she was 6 years old. William Brown was killed in a friendly wrestling match with a neighbor, April 28, 1814, and his wife died March 11, 1825. William Brown's father, Ichabod, was born in Cumberland, RI. He married Hannah Ballou of that place, and they were among the early settlers here. He was an officer in the Revolutionary War.



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