"M" to "Me" Surname Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


MacKay, John, Geneva, was born in 1813 in the South of Scotland, and in 1838 came to America, landing in Geneva with but twenty-five cents in his pocket.  For two years he worked on a farm and saved about $300, then went into a drug store in Geneva as clerk for several years.  He spent five years in a drug store in Penn Yan, then returned to Geneva and was salesman in a lumber yard for a few years.  In 1861 he in company with Dr. Conger, bought the lumber yard and there carried on business until 1878, when he bought Mr. Conger's interest and carried on business until 1885, when he retired.  In 1844 he was united in marriage with Emily Hayes of this town, and they had one child, Janette Sophia.  His wife died October 26, 1883.  The family are members of the Presbyterian church, in which Mr. MacKay has been an elder over a quarter of a century, and has done much towards building up the society.



From Shortsville Enterprise 20 November 1913

Donald Hector MacKenzie was born at North River, Nova Scotia, on July 17, 1876, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander MacKenzie, pioneers of that country. His mother emigrated from Scotland at the age of three months and his father was born in that country of Scottish parents a few years after their arrival here. His early education was obtained in the district schools of Nova Scotia. He was prepared for college under private tutorship. In 1901 he entered Taylor University at Upland, Indiana, where he remained for a year. The following year he entered Dalhousie University at Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he pursued a three years' course of study. After graduating from that institution, he went to Auburn Theological Seminary, finishing in 1908. The picture made from a photo taken at the time of his graduation at Auburn.

His first pastorate was at Trinity Presbyterian church at Manlius in 1908. When he went there the church was in a run-down condition; in fact, it had been vacant for six years previous and only partial services being held the year before his arrival. As a result of his untiring efforts, he re-organized the congregation, obtained a new pipe organ for the edifice and left the church in a year in a most flourishing condition.

Rev. MacKenzie's advent in Shortsville was in April, 1909, taking the pastorate of the first Presbyterian church. He pleased our people from the start and he and his estimable family have made many fast friends. The congregation has been enlarged and the church was never more prosperous than at the present time. His indefatigable labors here have been rewarded, and it is to be hoped that he will remain in our midst for years to come. He was married to Miss Ellie J. Godfrey, of Liverpool, Nova Scotia, on September 6, 1905. They went to Auburn on their honeymoon and he entered the Seminary for his final course of preparation for the ministry. Three lovable, vivacious children have blessed their union, Donald, Rachael and Ruth MacKenzie.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Cyrenius Macomber,
Manchester, was born in Farmington, August 30 1817.  He received his schooling in the district schools of the town, and in 1847 purchased his farm of ninety-six acres in this town.  Early in life he married Caroline M. Harmon, by whom he has had four children.  Cyrenius Macomber has lived always an upright and conscientious life, known and beloved by a host of friends and neighbors and acquaintances.  And now in his declining years he may rest assured that all know that he has worn the white flower of a blameless life, and worn it well, without ostentation or display.  He is a staunch Republican in politics, and has held some local town offices.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Polly Mallison, Victor, was born in the town of Perinton, Monroe county, October 22, 1809.  She has married twice, first to William H. Compton of Victor, and had two children:  William and Julia A., both deceased.  Mr. Compton is also deceased. For her second husband she married Amos Mallison of Akron, O.  They had no children.  Mrs. Mallison's father, Alexander Cameron, was a Scotchman, and was born on the ocean on their way to the United States.  He married Betsey Jackson, and had nine children:  David, William, John, Catherine, Nancy, Polly, Ruth, Sally, and Rachael.  Mrs. Mallison's grandson, Theodore Sidell, was brought up by Mrs. Mallison, and is now in charge of the farm.  After her death it reverts to him, and to his children after him. He was born in Akron, O., June 24, 1845.  He was educated in the public schools, and came to this State in the fall of the year Mr. and Mrs. Mallison came here, viz:  1870.  He married twice, first on January 11, 1871, Mary E. Conover, and had one daughter, Jennie M.  Mrs. Sidell died in July, 1876, and he married second on July 5, 1878, Mrs. Mary W. (Risley) Budington of Kingston, Ulster county; they have four children:  Jessie I., George A., Ward E., and Amos F. They all reside on the homestead farm that are living.  Mr. Mallison died January 25, 1877.  He was a soldier in the War of 1812. Mrs. Polly Mallison died May 1, 1893.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John W. Mapes,
Gorham, a son of Hiram, was born in Gorham June 1, 1823.  The Mapes family were natives of Wales.  One of the other generations introduced Normandy horses into England and for this act was knighted by the Crown and awarded a crest and coat of arms.  The family came to this country and were among the earliest settlers at Greenport and Southold, L. I.  Subsequently Phineas Mapes removed to Coxsackie, N. Y., where his son Hiram was born March 27, 1799.  The family lived for a few years at Mendon, and there Phineas Mapes died.  Hiram in early life went to Gorham, where he established a carding and cloth mill.  This he successfully managed for ten years and then took up farming, which he afterward continued.  February 24, 1821, he married Elizabeth Wyman, who was born in Gorham September 4, 1802.  They had six sons and four daughters.  Hiram Mapes died May 25, 1867, and his wife January 5, 1888.  John W. was educated in the common schools and is a farmer.  January 17, 1850, he married Minerva Barden, who was born in Benton November 26, 1826.  They have two children:  Ella, wife of Richard M. Ringer, of Rushville, and Arlington, who was graduated from Cook Academy in 1879, and from Cornell University in 1883, receiving the degree of Ph.B.  The parents of Mrs. Mapes were George and Dolly Witter Barden.  They had thirteen children, all of whom reached adult age.  George Barden, born at Attleborough, Mass., February 28, 1788, was among the earliest settlers of Benton, coming there with his father, Thomas, in 1799.  The family originally came from Plymouth, England.  Mrs. Barden was a daughter of Elijah Witter, of Seneca, and was born at Lackawaxen, Pa., February 22, 1789.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Myron Mariner,
East Bloomfield, a native of Sharon, Litchfield county, Conn., was born July 7, 1820, a son of Buell, a native of Connecticut, born January 6, 1775, and the fourth of a family of six children.  He married Esther Lord, a native of the same place, born August 10, 1784, and a daughter of John Lord of Connecticut.  Mr. Mariner and wife had eight sons, four of whom are living.  In 1823 he came to Yates county and spent a year, then went to Benton and bought a farm of 200 acres, on which he resided until his death January 6, 1852.  His wife died in 1877.  His farm is now owned by his youngest son.  Myron Mariner was educated in the common schools and taught for a short time, and then turned his attention to farming.  In 1848 he purchased 100 acres in East Bloomfield, which he now owns.  He has added many improvements to land and buildings.  For twenty years he was a breeder of American Merino sheep, for eleven of which he paid $2,500.  Mr. Mariner has been twice married.  First in 1847 to Ann M. Moody, a native of Seneca, and daughter of Benjamin Moody of that place.  To Mr. Mariner and wife was born one daughter, who died in infancy.  Mrs. Mariner died in 1849, and in 1852 Mr. Mariner married Abbie P. Marsh, a native of Litchfield county, Conn., and one of seven children of Horace and Electa (Beebe) Marsh, the former of Litchfield, Conn., and the latter of Canaan, Conn.  Mr. Marsh, died in 1844, at the age of seventy-two years.  Mr. Mariner has been a Republican since the organization of that party.  He was highway commissioner twelve years, and was supervisor in 1887-88.  His wife is a member of the Congregational church at East Bloomfield.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mrs. Emily C. Marks, Naples, was born in Windsor, Hartford county, Conn., youngest daughter of Roderick Holcombe. She married April 4, 1839, William Marks of Burlington. They moved to Naples the same month. Mr. Marks was about the first merchant who kept a general store in Naples. There are many interesting anecdotes told of Mr. Marks, who took a general interest in the welfare of the slaves and ran many of the escaped ones through on the underground railroad, sometimes in a hearse to Honeoye Flats. They had six children, three sons and three daughters. Two of the latter are now living: Mrs. A. Griswold and Emily C. Rogers, who resides in New York city. William R., the son, resides in Canandaigua, and was three years clerk of Ontario county. He has recently been appointed secretary and treasurer of the new Tin Manufacturing Co. of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Walter Marks,
Hopewell, was born in Hopewell in September, 1819, a son of William Marks, who was son of Ebenezer Marks, who came from Otsego county and settled in 1800 in the town of Eaton, now Hopewell.  His wife was a Miss French, and they had four sons and six daughters.  William was born in 1780, and married Betsey Knapp of Otsego county, and they had one son and four daughters.  Her father was Ezra, and her grandfather was named Ebenezer.  Mr. William Marks died in Hopewell in 1840, and his wife in 1855.  Walter Marks was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools.  In 1840 he married Sena Benham, a native of Hopewell and a daughter of Brazil and Electa Benham, early settlers of Hopewell, who had nine children.  The children of Mr. Marks and wife are:  William R. (deceased); Eugenia, wife of Gardner L. Archer, of Hopewell; and W. Franklin, who resides on the farm purchased by his father in 1840.  He married Isabella Butler, and his children are:  Jessie E., Ethel F. and Walter H.  Walter Marks is a Republican, has been commissioner of highways; justice of peace twenty years; supervisor eight years, and county clerk.  Mr. Marks owns a farm of eighty acres in Hopewell, which farm is separated from the farm taken by his grandfather in 1800 by a highway.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Marsh, Enoch O., Phelps, one of six children of Samuel and Milanthe (Hall) Marsh, was born in Phelps, March 3, 1846.  Samuel, the father, was also born in Phelps, where he died in 1877 at eighty years of age. Hosea, the grandfather, was born in Guilford in 1876 and came to Phelps in 1804, where he built a log house. He spent the remainder of his life here, dying at the age of eighty-three years.  The great-grandfather, William Marsh, was born in Vermont, his ancestors coming from England and settling there at an early date.  Milanthe Hall, the mother, was a daughter of John Hall.  Her grandfather was a soldier and was killed during the Revolutionary war.  Enoch O. married in December, 1867, Emma Loveredge of Phelps, daughter of William and Mary Burnett of Schoharie county.  Mr. Marsh is a representative citizen and has served as justice of the peace for eight years.  His farm of nearly 100 acres is used largely for grain.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Horatio H. Marsh, Bristol, was born in Bristol, September 18, 1820, and is a son of Parley Marsh, a son of Elisha Marsh, a native of Vermont. Parley Marsh was born in Vermont in 1791, and about 1815 came to Bristol and here married Betsey Hicks, born in 1798, daughter of Jabez Hicks. They had two children: Thadeus, who died at the age of two years, and Horatio H. Horatio H. was reared on a farm and was but two years of age when his father died in 1822. Mrs. Marsh then married Sylvester Wheeler by whom she had five children. Two are living: Sylvester H. and Mrs. Orville Bentley. When subject was thirteen years old his stepfather died, and he was obliged to help support the family, working by the month on a farm. He early in life took charge of his father's farm of eighty acres, and after many years bought out the heirs. Here he lived until 1889, in which year his mother died, when he moved to a small place east of Bristol Hill. In 1871 Mr. Marsh married Mary L. Jones, of Bristol, daughter of Elijah Jones. Mr. Marsh is a Republican, and he has been assessor six years. He and family attend the Universalist church.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;
 
Harry D. Marshall, was born at Dresden, N. Y., on February 21, 1883. He was educated at Geneva Public and High schools and was graduated from Hobart College in 1906. He then entered Albany Law School and graduated in 1908 and was admitted to the bar in 1908. Returning to Geneva he was associated with John W. Mellen in the real estate and insurance business and later became cashier of the old Farmers and Merchants Bank which merged with the Geneva Trust Company in 1919. He was elected secretary and a director of the bank at that time.

Mr. Marshall has been prominent in Republican politics, both in the city and county. He was appointed city clerk in 1912 by Mayor R. H. Gulvin. In 1914 he became city treasurer and was re-elected in 1916-18 and 20. He was an alderman from the First Ward from 1920 to 22 and in 1925 was named a member of the city finance commission by Mayor Henry T. Maxwell. In 1929 Mayor M. S. Gaylord named Mr. Marshall as a commissioner of Public Works and he was elected president of the Board and re-elected for 1930-31. Mr. Marshall is a former Republican city committeeman and was a supervisor from the First City District from 1922 to 24.

He is a member of the Geneva Club, a former director of the Lodge of Elks, the Rod & Gun, Chamber of Commerce and an active member, group 2, of the Seneca Yacht Club. He is a member of St. Peter's Episcopal church. In July, 1911, Mr. Marshall married Edith O. Wilcox of MacDougall. Mrs. Marshall died November, 1925. From 1921 to 1929 Mr. Marshall was treasurer of Geneva General Hospital and is at present a member of the hospital finance commission.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Martin, Jacob, Hopewell, was born in Rush, Monroe county, November 3, 1820. His father was John, a native of Maryland, who came with his parents to Monroe county, and there lived and died.  His wife was Mary Moyers, and they reared six children.  Jacob Martin was raised on a farm, and at the age of twenty-one went to Henrietta and engaged in the manufacture of carriages, which he followed until 1861, when he came to Chapinville and soon afterward began the manufacture of spokes, hubs, etc.  He is at present in business with Albert S. Glass & Son, carriage wheel manufactures. They employ 150 men and have a greater output than any other factory in the State.  October 24, 1847, Mr. Martin married Emeline Dennis, a native of Kennebec county, Me., born in 1826.  Her parents Jacob and Nancy (Longfellow) Dennis, came to Henrietta in 1847, and in 1849 went to Canandaigua.  The father of Mrs. Dennis, Stephen Longfellow was a cousin of Henry W. Longfellow. Mr. Dennis and wife had seven children, five of whom are living.  The children of Mr. Martin are:  Mary L. (deceased), Isabella, Edward D., and Emma D. Mr. Martin is a Republican. Mrs. Martin and daughters are members of the Universalist church at Clifton Springs.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Judge Francis O. Mason, another distinguished member of the Geneva bar, was a contemporary of Judge Folger. He was born in the town of Bristol, this county, but most of his professional life was spent in Geneva. Judge Mason served the county as Judge for several years and with great ability. He was a Republican and was a member of the National Convention of 1876 when General Grant was a candidate for a third term, Judge Mason being one of the "old guard" that remained constant to Grant to the close of the convention. Judge Mason was at one time a partner of Judge Folger and later was associated with A. P. Rose, Esq., the firm name being Mason & Rose. Judge Mason was deeply interested in Geneva affairs and he, together with Samuel VerPlanck and Philip N. Nicholas, Esq., organized the Geneva Police Department and were the first police commissioners. Judge Mason was also active in establishing the Geneva City Hospital. His death occurred in 1900.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

J. Harvey Mason, Canandaigua, was born in South Bloomfield, May 6m 1819, a son of Jesse, a native of Massachusetts, who came to this section in 1813. He was born in Bristol, Mass., in 1795 and married, when about twenty-three years of age, Mehibable, daughter of Amos Lee of South Bloomfield, and they had twelve children, seven of whom survive: Three sons are in Buffalo, one daughter in Fall River, Mass. and one in Canandaigua; a brother, Henry is a merchant in East Bloomfield. Our subject, J. H., was the oldest son. When about three years old his parents moved to Rochester and in 1829 to Canandaigua, where his father engaged in tanning. J. H. was educated in the district school (where their store is now located), also Canandaigua. On leaving school he learned the tanning business, in which he has always been engaged, also dealing in hides, wool, tallow, etc. In 1891 they handled from 60,000 to 80,000 lbs. of wool alone. Mr. Mason has always taken an interest in politics, and has twice represented his town as supervisor. He has also been overseer of the poor several years. He is a director of the Canandaigua Lake Steamboat Company of which he is vice-president. He is the oldest Mason of Canandaigua having been a member since 1853. He married July 2, 1840, Harriet, daughter of Allen Smith, a grocer of this town, and they have one son, Jesse H., a partner in the business.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mather, Charles R., Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, February 8, 1863. He is a son of George C., a farmer of this town, born in Middlesex, Yates county, June 16, 1835, who came to Canandaigua in 1850, when he bought the farm now occupied by Charles R. He married in 1850 Malvira A., daughter of John Adams of Middlesex, by whom he has five children:  John L., a mechanic of Shortsville; Rebecca J., wife of Thomas M. Weatherwax of Carrol county, Ill.; Sarah R., wife of Frederick Douglass of Canandaigua; Alice N., wife of C. F. Robertson of Canandaigua, and Charles R. Mr. Mather has always taken an active interest in politics and has been excise commissioner twelve years. Charles R. is recognized as one of the leading Republicans of his district and has twice been selected member of the county Executive committee. He married in 1884 Louisa, daughter of George Stearns, a merchant of Rushville, by whom he has two children:  Leah and Helen. The old homestead contains 143 acres, the principal crops being grain and fruit.  They are also breeders of horses.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mather, Zachariah,
Canandaigua, was born Middlesex, Yates county, November 20, 1819, a son of Lucius and Jane (Ackerman) Mather.  Zachariah, the grandfather, was a native of Connecticut and had two sons, Eleazer and Lucius.  Lucius was born in Connecticut about 1787, and came to Fayette, Seneca county, when a young man.  He married Jane Ackerman, of Fayette, and they had five children:  John, Zachariah, Abraham, George, and Lucinda.  The early life of our subject was spent in Middlesex.  He assisted on his father's farm until twenty-nine years of age.  In 1849 he moved to Ontario county, and bought a farm on the Academy Tract in Canandaigua, where he has since made his home.  He has increased the size of the farm to 120 acres, and erected a fine residence and barn.  The principal products of the farm are fruit and stock, and the place is known as Maple Grange.  Mr. Mather has occupied various offices of trust in his neighborhood.  He married in Middlesex in 1849 Theodocia, daughter of Chauncey Adams, an early settler of Middlesex, and they had one son, Lucius Chauncey.  Mrs. Mather died October 29, 1883, at fifty eight years of age.  Lucius C. Mather was born November 11, 1849.  He was educated in the Lima Seminary, and is a farmer and veterinary surgeon.  He is interested in the breeding of fancy stock, and has taken many prizes at county fairs.  He is an active member of the Canandaigua Baptist Church.  In 1877 he married Jennie, daughter of Erastus Green, a resident of Montana, but a native of Yates county.  Mr. Mather has two children:  Ethel L., born July 27, 1880; and Theodocia A., born January 12 1883.  Mr. Mather is a member of Academy Grange No. 62, and has held office of master eight years, and is secretary and present lecturer, and master of County Grange four years, and secretary  two years.  He has been vice-president of the Ontario County Agricultural Association for three years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

McArthur, James, Canandaigua, superintendent and manager of the Vanderbilt Sash Balance Co. (incorporated in Canandaigua in 1872), is a native of Canandaigua, where he was born in 1853. After leaving school he engaged in the furniture business, which he has always been interested in up till 1888. In 1886 he got out a patent for a sash balance, which he sold, and it is now manufactured at Rochester by the Pullman Sash Balance Co.  In January, 1890, he was the patentee of the Perfection Sash Balance, which is also manufactured at Rochester.  The same year he made an improvement on the Pullman patent, which he sold to the company. In 1891 he patented a spring fruit grate for shipping fruit, which avoids all jarring in shipping the fruit.  This is manufactured in Rochester.  His next device in 1892 was a car brake and truck which he sold, and it is a success. In 1892 Mr. McArthur devised and patented the Vanderbilt Sash Balance, and after selling to the company in Canandaigua, he was employed to come here and act as superintendent of the manufacture, he retaining a large interest in the work.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Samuel McBlain, Geneva, was born in the town of Seneca May 30, 1836. He was reared on the farm and followed farming as an occupation in the summers, attending the district schools in the winter and graduated at the Albany Normal School in 1861. August 15, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Forty-fourth Regiment N. Y. Volunteers as a private. He was successively promoted to the office of corporal, sergeant and first sergeant in said company. In October, 1864, the term of enlistment of the original Forty-fourth Regiment having expired, he was transferred to Company I, One Hundred and Fortieth Regiment N. Y. S. Volunteers. In this regiment he held the office of sergeant-major, second lieutenant and acting adjutant, first lieutenant, and at Appomattox was brevetted captain. February 22, 1866, he married Sarah J. Huie of Geneva, and they have had four children: George, residing at home; H. Mills, who was killed by accident with a horse; Thomas, who died when nine months old, and Jennie E., residing at home with her parents. Mr. McBlain's father was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1797, and came to the United States in 1824. He married Mary A. Martin and had five children: Robert, who went into the war from California in the Confederate cavalry; William J. who died in 1861; Mary A.; Samuel, the subject of this sketch, and George, who was killed at the first Fredericksburg battle. Mrs. McBlain's father, Thomas Huie, was born in the town of Geneva August 2, 1802. He was educated in the public schools and married Sarah Harris, formerly of Maryland, and they had four children: John H., Prudence B., George E., and Sarah J. Mr. Huie died May 27, 1877, and his wife died July 22, 1883. Captain McBlain participated in the following battles: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Middleburg, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, Weldon Road, Poplar Spring Church, Five Forks and Appomattox Court House. At the close of the war Captain McBlain settled on the farm where he now resides and holds the office of postmaster.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

 
McCarthy, Mrs. Carrie A. U., Victor.  Mrs. McCarthy's late father, Josiah Upton, was born on the Old Upton farm north of the village, and occupied now by Jeremiah W. Hawkins.  He was educated in the public schools and Lima Seminary, and was a farmer and produce dealer by occupation.  In September, 1836, he married Sophia Roe, formerly of Massachusetts, and they had three children:  Maria P.; William H. and Carrie A., who married John McCarthy, and had three children:  George E., John N., and Ralph E., residing at home with their mother.  Mr. McCarthy died October 31, 1885.  Mrs. McCarthy's grandfather, James Upton, came from Charlemont, Mass., and located on the farm, purchasing it for $12 per acre.  He was the first poormaster in the town of Victor.  He married Olive Boughton, and had thirteen children:  Olive, Achsah, Josiah, William W., James, Edward, Uri, Caroline, Mary, Charles, Alvira and Maria, one died in infancy.  Mr. McCarthy's brother, William R., was a soldier in the late war in the Fifth Ohio Vols., and was honorably discharged at the close of the war.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


McCarthy, M.D., C.D., Geneva, son of Charles T. and Catherine (McKean) McCarthy, was born December 24, 1860, in Canandaigua, where he was educated at the academy.  He graduated in 1882 from the Genesee Normal School, and in 1888 graduated from the University of Buffalo. He practiced one year in Kansas City, and then settled in Geneva, and December 30, 1891, married May E., daughter of John O'Neill of East Bloomfield.  Dr. McCarthy is a member of the County Medical Society.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Darwin McClure
, was born in Onondaga county, November 9, 1942, of Scotch Irish descent.  The father of Darwin was Hiram, son of James, a native of Vermont, who came to Onondaga county in 1791, and there lived until his death in 1852.  Hiram was born on the old homestead in October, 1800.  In 1822 he married a Miss Maker, and they had eight children, seven of whom grew to maturity.  Mr. McClure died in 1857.  Darwin McClure was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools and Friendship Academy.  In 1864 Georgietta Miles became his wife, and they had one child, Georgietta.  Mr. McClure is a farmer and in politics until 1872 was a Republican; he has since been a Democrat.  In 1865 he came to Hopewell and purchased a farm of 110 acres, on which an old Indian village and burying ground was located, and has there since resided.  He was one of the organizers in 1877 of the Ontario County Patrons' Fire Relief Association, was treasurer until 1886, since which he has been secretary of the association.  He has held several town offices, and is a member of Hopewell Grange No. 172.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Alonzo McCredy, Canandaigua, was born in Warren, February 22, 1822.  His grandfather, Robert McCredy, came to this country the latter part of the eighteenth century, settling in Florida, Montgomery county, where Thomas, father of Alonzo, was born in 1795.  When about twenty he moved to Herkimer county, at that time a wilderness, and bought a farm of about 100 acres, which he made into a good grain farm.  He married Hannah Blatchly, of Peekskill, and they had twelve children, five of whom are living:  James, a farmer of Michigan; Eliza, widow of James T. Yule, of Herkimer county; Robert, of Olean; Hanford, a retired farmer of Warren, Herkimer county; and Alonzo.  The latter was given a common school education and in 1856 moved to Minnesota, where he spent four years, and then moved to Illinois, where he lived three years, and in 1863 returned to New York State, locating in this county.  He bought a farm of 149 acres in this town, where he has ever since made his home.  Mr. McCredy has never taken an active part in politics.  He is content to be known as an honest, upright citizen and a successful farmer.  He married in 1853 Louisa, daughter of Peter Rankin, of Herkimer county, and they have two sons:  Elliott, an employee of the Sanitarium at Clifton Springs, and Dimmock, who lives at home.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John Willard McCrossen
, Richmond, was born on the farm where he now lives March 20, 1816.  His father, James McCrossen, son of David, was born in 1780 in Dungerry, County Tyrone, Ireland.  David was a Scotchman, his mother being also Scotch.  James came to this country when eighteen years of age, settling first in Philadelphia, and eight years later came to Richmond.  He had been a distiller.  He bought at first seven acres on which was water power.  Here he operated a distillery in 1806, which he continued until his death in 1820.  He married Deborah, daughter of Alden Adams.  She was born in Vermont in 1789, and died at the age of eighty-six.  Of their five children, David died in Grand Rapids, Mich., aged eighty-three years; Jane, wife of William Pursell, died in Springwater, aged eighty-three; Susan, wife of J. D. Hazen, died in Grand Rapids, aged seventy; John W. and James who died young.  John W. was educated at the common schools, and in 1835 married Alida Westbrook, by whom he had these children:  Erzilla, Mrs. Lyman Bowles, of Cohocton; Alida, wife of James Capron, of Springwater.  His second wife was Lucina Adams, whom he married in 1844.  She was a daughter of Isaac Adams, a pioneer of the town, who came with Philip Reed in 1795.  Their children are:  Birdie A., who lives at home; Deborah, Mrs. J. M. Miller; Sylvia, Mrs. W. J. Short, of Michigan.  Mr. McCrossen has 426 acres in his home farm, and 148 acres in Canadice.
 


From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

McJannett Brothers -
James P. was born in Canandaigua October 16, 1847, and his brother, John A., was also born in the same town November 6, 1849.  The father, David, was born in Dalrymple, Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1812, and came to this country in May, 1840, settling in Canandaigua, first on the Metcalf farm, then the Bates farm.  After various removals he finally settled on the farm now owned by Chester Welch, where he died January 24, 1861.  He married in Scotland in 1837 Janet Dunlop, by whom he had eight children, six now living:  Robert M., a printer of Naples, for many years editor and proprietor of the Naples Record, and of late years J. P. of that town; Margaret, now living with her brother; Mary, wife of Hiram Adams, of Richmond; Isabella, wife of Horace Outhouse of Canandaigua; and James P. and John A.  David W. died October 30, 1864, at Chestnut Hill Hospital, a member of Company H, Fourth New York Heavy Artillery.  William died June 20, 1866, aged fourteen.  John A. was a teacher during winter terms for several years.  Our subjects have always lived in this town.  They were educated in the common school at Canandaigua and at the academy, and after leaving school engaged in farming.  In 1863 the farm in the Academy Tract was bought by Robert McJannett, and sold by him to these brothers in 1875.  In the spring of 1884 they bought a farm on lot eighty-three, which they still own, making now four hundred acres of land on which they do general farming, with stock and hops a specialty.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


 McKechnie Family - In 1883 two brothers, James and Alexander McKechnie, aged seventeen and twelve respectively, left their native home in Falkirk, Scotland, for America, landing in Canada, where they remained but a short time when they moved to Rochester, where their father and elder brother were engaged in the brewing business.  In 1843 these two young brothers discovered that Canandaigua offered the advantage of a good spring of water and other facilities for the brewing business, so they moved to this town and the same year they bought out a small brewery.  Starting in a small way with an establishment having a capacity of 500 barrels per year, they gradually increased their buildings and business capacity until 1861, when we find they were making from ten to twelve thousand barrels per year.  In 1861 the whole was destroyed by fire, but they were indomitable and immediately rebuilt and continued their business.  In 1871 the establishment was rebuilt and since that time many buildings have been added, as the increase of business demanded having now a capacity of fifty thousand barrels a year.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Frederick A. McKechnie, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua in 1865, a son of Alexander.  He was educated at Canandaigua Academy and Swarthmore College, and after leaving school returned to Canandaigua, and in 1884 entered the McKechnie Bank as clerk.  He was appointed to his present position as assistant cashier in February, 1890.  Mr. McKechnie is a director and secretary of the Canandaigua Lake Steamboat Company, and is vice-president of the J. & A. McKechnie Brewing Company.  Alexander McKechnie died January 28, 1883, in his sixty-second year, and the following year the J. & A. McKechnie Brewing Company as a stock company was organized, changing none in the management as the stock was held entirely by different members of the family.  James McKechnie died September 12, 1889, aged seventy-four, leaving no children.  Alexander McKechnie left at his death six children:  Isabella, wife of H. L. Howe of the Ontario Iron Works; John D., president and treasurer of the J. & A. McKechnie Brewing Company; George W. died August 16, 1889, he had been vice-president, head brewer and superintendent in the brewery, and a man of more than ordinary business ability.  His death was caused by heart disease.  The other children are:  Mrs. J. W. Swain of Philadelphia; Alexander, jr., died June 30, 1884, who had been the assistant cashier of the McKechnie Bank; and the youngest child is Fred A., assistant cashier.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Benjamin F. McKinney
, Geneva, was born in Bradford county, Pa., November 17, 1843, a son of Henry and Amanda McKinney.  In March, 1864, he enlisted in Company I. One Hundred and Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania Vols., and was mustered out August 3, 1865, as corporal.  He has been in the employ of the L. V. R. R. since November, 1871.  In October, 1884, he came to Geneva as local freight agent, and in 1872 married Laura Mallory, of Litchfield, Pa.  They have two children:  Lizzie M. and Carrie A.  Mr. McKinney is a member of Swift Post G. A. R. No. 94, and was formerly a member of Perkins Post.  He is adjutant of Swift Post.  His father, Henry McKinney, resides with him.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

 
McKnutt, the late Isaac, was born in the town of Manchester April 27, 1833.  He was educated in the common schools and followed farming.  March 14, 1859, he married Eliza, daughter of Martin and Elizabeth Miller, formerly of St. Lawrence county.  She came here with her mother when she was seven years old.  They had four children, one died in infancy, three survive:  Isaac F., who manages the farm for his mother and the family; Susie A., who married Nelson C. Reeves of East Henrietta, Monroe county, and Louie M., who resides at home.  Isaac McKnutt died May 8, 1892.  Mr. McKnutt's father, Robert was born in 1805, in the town of Manchester and married Angeline Stafford of his native town.  They had seven children:  Pauline J., Phoebe A., Isaac, Belinda E., Emily M., Augusta A., and Augustus R.  Robert McKnutt died December 8, 1883.  Mrs. McKnutt's father, Martin Miller, was born in Scotland about the year of 1804.  Her father married Elizabeth Cabalon, and had five children:  Joseph, Annie, Mary H., Jennie and Eliza.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Marshall McLouth,
Farmington, was born in Farmington August 30, 1815.  He was educated in the public schools, and was a farmer until he retired.  December 31,1838, he married Margaret, daughter of Ebenezer and Margaret (Spear) Pratt of the town of Manchester.  They have had seven children, five survive:  Lucy, who married Charles Converse, now of Michigan, and have eight children: Milton, Edward, Charles, Howard, LeRoy, Allison, Roscoe and Margaret; Mary, who resides at home with her parents; Louis H., who married Celia Thayer, and have three children:  Wells, Hannah, and Marshall; Gustavus A., who married Mary Bloodgood, and have five children:  Eva, Harriet, Jessie, Carlton, and Sarah.  Jessie married Edwin A. Adams.  Mr. McLouth's father, Peter, was born in Taunton, Mass., in 1761, was a brick manufacturer and school teacher by occupation.  He came to Farmington in 1800.  He married twice, first Lavina Wells of Williamstown, Mass., and had one son, William W.  For his second wife, he married Lydia Osgood, formerly of the State of Vermont.  They had eleven children, eight grew to maturity:  Walter, Lonson, Thomas, jr., Cyrus, Harriet, Lyman, Peter and Marshall.  His father, Peter, and four of his brothers served in the Revolutionary War.  Mr. McLouth served two years as supervisor of his town in 1864-65, and was a right loyal man during the late war.  His grandfather was educated in the Maynooth College, and after coming to the United States taught a grammar school in Massachusetts.  John Hancock was one of his pupils.  Mrs. McLouth's father, Ebenezer Pratt, was born in Berkshire county, Mass., came to this county in the year 1795, and married Margaret Spear, formerly of Keene, N. H., and had seven children, six grew to maturity:  Electa, Dighton, Achsah, Ebenezer, Meritt and Margaret.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Norton McMillan,
Canandaigua, the first son of Peter and Lusena (Towner) McMillan, was born on the old Granger farm in this town September 2, 1843.  He was eighteen years old when the war broke out, but enlisted July 22, 1862, in the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth N. Y. Vols., and participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Bristow Station, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, and many others.  December 25, 1864, at the consolidation of the regiment, which caused the discharge of part of the non-commissioned officers, Norton returned to Canandaigua, and engaged in farming in different places in the West and New York.  In 1878 he bought a farm of 105 acres in Canandaigua, which he conducted for four years, then sold, and rented the old Wilder farm, which he bought in 1885.  This is a fine place of 115 acres.  He married, March 16, 1870, Anna, daughter of James Curran, of Livonia, Livingston county, and they have two sons:  Peter A., born May 30, 1871, and Roy H., born December 4, 1876.  Peter A. is a school teacher; Roy H. is a student of the Union School of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

McMillan, Peter H.
, Canandaigua, was born at Conesus, Livingston county, May 15, 1818.  His father, John McMillan, was a native of New Hampshire, where he was born in 1766.  He was twice married and had seven children by his first wife.  He married second Rhoda Jackson, mother of subject, and widow of John Reeves, by whom she had five children.  By his second wife, Mr. McMillan had three children; two of the children of John are living:  Mrs. Rhoda Howe, of Lyons, Ionia county, Mich., and Peter H.  John McMillan died in Livingston county in 1840.  Peter H. was educated in the common and select schools, and in August, 1841, removed to Ontario county, locating on a farm owned by Francis Granger.  He conducted this for nine years, then bought a farm of ninety-five acres on the town line of East Bloomfield and Canandaigua, where he lived about six years.  He then sold the land in East Bloomfield and bought in Canandaigua 125 acres, having now about 200 acres.  Mr. McMillan is a Democrat, and he has been three terms assessor of East Bloomfield.  He married in 1840 Lusena Tower, of Saratoga.  They had eleven children, nine of whom are living:  Horton, a farmer in Canandaigua; John of Kansas; Mary Potter of Williamsport, Pa.; Rhoda Berry of Canandaigua; Converse on a stock farm in Indiana; Lusena, wife of Lyman Cooley, a civil engineer of Chicago; and Peter, George and Henry, all farmers, of Canandaigua.  Mrs. McMillan died July 25, 1880, and he married second Nancy Clapp of Canandaigua, who died October 25, 1886.  His present wife was a daughter of Stephen Francis of Bristol, who died October 18, 1892, aged eighty-six years.  Mr. McMillan was one of the earliest breeders of American Merino sheep in this section.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Francis X. McNulty, Canandaigua, was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1848, was educated in the common schools and learned the mason's trade, becoming a contractor in 1864. In 1865 he came to New York, where he worked for one year, and was in Palmyra one season. In 1868 he had the contract for the Gibson block in Phelps; the next season he built the Foster block in Clifton Springs, and the school building. In 1872 he came to Canandaigua, and ever since has had nearly all of the brick work. He built the Union Free School building, Tillotson block, Masseth House, Flannigan and Times block, Water Works plant, McKechnie's lager beer brewery, and many others. In 1881 he began the construction of buildings for the New York Central Railroad Company, and has done a large portion of their mason work between East Syracuse and Buffalo, including buildings, walls, bridges, and culverts. He is one of the trustees of the Union School, and police commissioner of this village. He is a Democrat, but not an office seeker. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and married in 1885 Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Moran, of Canandaigua, by whom he has one child, Katherine Regina.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

McTeggan, James, Canandaigua, was born in Beanbarnois, Canada, March 20, 1829.  When six years of age his parents moved to Ogdensburg, where his father, George, engaged in farming.  He afterwards moved to Waterloo, and in 1844 went into the employment of the Auburn and Rochester R.R. Company, making his home in Waterloo.  In 1848 he moved to Geneva, where he died in February, 1873, in his seventieth year.  He left four children:  Ann Jane, widow of John T. Scoon, of Geneva; George, an engineer on the N.Y.C.R.R. Co.; Mary, wife of Cornelius A. Hemiup, of Geneva; and James.  James was educated in the common schools and academics at Seneca Falls and Waterloo.  After leaving school he engaged in farming in Waterloo for five years.  In 1847 he entered the employ of the Auburn and Rochester R. R. as baggage master and mail carrier.  From Geneva he went to Newark, N.Y., where he was station agent for the N.Y.C. for two years, and in 1855 came to Canandaigua as station agent, remaining nine years, then went to Suspension Bridge as freight agent for the same company, where he was located until 1880.  That year he moved to Buffalo, where he acted as general western freight agent for the N.Y.C. & H.R.R., a position he held for twelve years, returning to Canandaigua in 1892, where he bought his present farm and beautiful residence.  This is a fine fruit farm of forty-seven acres, formerly owned by Cong Lanefort, on which forty years ago Abner Antis built the beautiful stone mansion, considered one of the finest in the town.  On this farm in 1887 an attempt was made to reach natural gas, which was partially successful.  Mr. McTeggan now has the use of gas from this well for heating and cooking.  Mr. McTeggan married in 1852 Elizabeth LeGard, by whom he had two children, one now living, Mrs. John Burke, of Niagara Falls.  Mrs. McTeggan died in 1860, and he married second in 1862, Anna Wilson, of Canandaigua.  They have one child living, John S., a clerk for the N.Y.C.R.R. at Buffalo.  One child, Lizzie, died May 3, 1878, in her eleventh year.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Alfred M. Mead,
Victor, was born at Macedon Centre, Wayne county, November 21, 1856.  He was educated in the public schools, and graduated from the Macedon Academy.  He studied medicine in, and graduated from, the Medical Department of the University of Buffalo, practicing successfully in the town of Victor since 1880.  April 6, 1881, he married Hattie A., daughter of Robert K. and Mary Brown, of Union Hall, Wayne county.  They have three children:  Edgar R., Dora E. and M. Evelyn.  The father of Alfred, John G., was born in Dutchess county, and was a farmer.  He married Emma Cookingham, of his native county, and they had three children:  Edgar, who married Alice Smith, and had two children:  Louie and Alvin; Alfred M.; and E. Louise, who married Dr. Charles Briggs of Fairport.  She died in March, 1881.  Dr. Mead is member of the Ontario County Medical Society, and of the Methodist church, and was coroner of Ontario county two terms.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James Mead
, a native of Gorham, was born April 30, 1836.  He is a son of William, a son of Amasiah, who was a son of Thaddeus.  The latter was an early settler of Westchester county, where Amasiah was born February 14, 1770.  He married Abigail Jessup, born March 20, 1769, a daughter of Sylvanus Jessup, and they had four sons and two daughters.  He died June 7, 1844, and his wife January 13, 1858.  William was born in Westchester county October 15, 1795.  In 1821 he came to Gorham and finally bought the farm of 155 acres where subject now resides.  Mr. Mead was twice married, first, January 24, 1821, to Sallie Baker, by whom he had two children.  She died September 6, 1829, and October 19, 1831, he married Mabel Sterling, a native of Lima, and they had two sons and four daughters.  She was born November 3, 1810.  Her parents were James and Mabel (Chester) Sterling, who had seven sons and two daughters.  The father of James was Samuel Sterling of Connecticut.  William Mead died in 1858 and his wife in 1861.  James Mead was educated in Spencertown Academy, Columbia county, and Canandaigua Academy.  February 18, 1864, he married Mary A. Dickerson, a native of Gorham, born January 21, 1842.  She was a daughter of Selah Dickerson, a son of David Dickerson, of Pennsylvania, who came early to Gorham.  Selah Dickerson was born in Gorham, August 27, 1806, and married Lucy A. Holton, of Gorham, born July 10, 1811, a daughter of Francis Holton, born June 9, 1781.  Mr. Dickerson and wife had three sons and a daughter.  He was assessor and highway commissioner, and died September 16, 1869.  His wife died February 1, 1888.  The children of James Mead and wife are:  William M., Lucy I., Jennie L., and Mabel S.  Mr. Mead is a Republican, and has been assessor one term.  He has been vice-president and director of Gorham Agricultural Society, and is a member of Stanley Grange, No. 284, and is a very prominent member of the Presbyterian Church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Meath, Bernard, Canandaigua, was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, in 1826, and came to this country in 1847.  He first located on the west shore of Canandaigua Lake, then spent six years with Theodore Pomeroy in Farmington for $156 per year.  He kept a small store in Cheshire for eight years, and in 1861 bought the Stiles farm of 110 acres, and the following year bought the Simmons farm of seventy five acres, making one large farm of 185 acres, on which he has made many improvements.  In 1874 he built one of the finest residences on the Middle Road, and since then he has built barns and other outbuildings, until now he has one of the finest homes in Canandaigua.  The principal products of the farm are grain, and hay, and stock.  He married in 1849 Ann Coney, who died in 1874, and he took for his second wife, Mary Cougevan of Canandaigua, by whom he had seven children:  Bernard, Mary, Nora, James, Ann, Mathew and John.  Mr. Meath has always taken an active interest in politics, in which he has worked for the success of the Democratic party.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Horace Meech was a canal forwarder, owned a line of canal boats running from Geneva to Albany and New York, which obtained a great reputation. He resided in Geneva for some time and then removed to Albany where he died.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John W. Mellen
, Geneva, was born in Clyde, Wayne county, April 21, 1861.  The family came to Geneva about the year 1873.  He was educated in the public schools and Hobart College, where he took the classical course.  At the end of three years he left on account of failing health, and has held the position of cashier in Samuel Southworth's bank for several years.  He was elected town clerk in 1892 and re-elected in 1893.  He was appointed clerk of the Board of Education, on which he has served three years.  September 16, 1891, he married s. Georgiana Dininny, of Addison, Steuben county, and they have one son, John D., born November 11, 1892.  Mr. Mellen's father, James P., was born in Hudson, Columbia county, and married Maria Rose, of Clyde.  They have seven children, as follows:  Charles R., Sarah, James, John W., Mary R., Catharine and Arthur H.  Mrs. Mellen's father, John W. Dininny, was born in Oneonta, Otsego county, in 1822, and is an attorney.  He married Sarah Coburn, and they had four children:  Harper J., William D., Carleton V., and S. Georgiana.  Mr. Dininny served as colonel of the One Hundred and Forty-first N. Y. Vols., but had to resign by order of the regimental surgeon, by reason of impaired vision, which if he continued in service would lead to total blindness.



From Phelps Citizen 18 October 1900

Jonathan Melvin was born in Grafton, Mass. He settled on Melvin Hill. He died May 25, 1841, aged 90 years. He was a soldier in the Revolution. His wife was Beulah, daughter of Elder James Leland, and was born in 1762 and died in the town of Greece, N. Y. Mr. Melvin set out a great many apple trees. He had a family of 13 children who were born in Ashfield or Conway: 1. Jonathan, born in 1779, married Clarry Castle; 2. Caleb, removed to Webster; 3. Ansel, removed to Illinois, 4. Polly, married Philander Glover; 5. Betsy, married Caleb Rice; 6. Sylvia; 7. John, removed to Michigan; 8. Ora, who died March 29, 1860, aged 55 years; and 9. Lucy. There were others who died in childhood.

Jonathan Melvin, Jr., died Dec. 25, 1841, aged 83 years, and is buried in the Melvin Hill cemetery. His wife died in 1816, aged 65 years; and his second wife wife, Rebecca _______, died in 1853, aged 74 years. His son, Almon, though residing many years in Wayne county, returned to Phelps about 1840 and died at the homestead October 31, 1886, aged 85 years; an exemplary man. Dr. John Melvin settled in Shortsville. A daughter, Maria, born 1808, married in 1824, Hugh Jameson of Lyons. Mr. Jameson died in 1864 and Mrs. Jameson in 1885. There ought to be more information gleaned of the Melvin family and of their labors in helping Phelps to establish its reputation for fine fields and an abundance of fruits.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James Stuart Menteth,
Canandaigua, was born at Menteth's Point, town of Canandaigua, July 29, 1841, a son of Thomas Loughnan Stuart Menteth, who came to this country from Dumfries, Scotland, in 1832.  Thomas was a son of Sir Charles Menteth, who was the father of seven sons and two daughters.  The oldest son, James Stuart Menteth, inherited the title at the death of Sir Charles Menteth in 1852.  Thomas Menteth died in 1854, leaving three sons and two daughters.  At the death of Sir James in 1870 the title reverted to James Stuart, our subject.  Thomas L. was an English army officer, and served from 1818 to 1830 in the service in India, retiring with the office of captain.  He returned in 1830 to Scotland, where he remained till 1832, when he came to America and located on the west shore of Canandaigua Lake about six miles from Canandaigua village.  He purchased here an estate of over 400 acres, and built a flouring mill, which he conducted in connection with general farming.  He lived to fifty-eight years of age, and died an honored and respected citizen.  His children living are:  Alice, wife of George Finley, of Canandaigua; and James Stuart.  The boyhood of our subject was spent on the farm of his birth.  He was educated in Canandaigua Academy, Dr. Reed's Walnut Hill School at Geneva, Lima Seminary, and two years under Hon. John Raines as private tutor.  In 1859 he went to California, where he was engaged in stock ranching for four and a half years and mining over two years, returning to Canandaigua in 1866, where he has ever since made his home, and has added to the original estate many improvements, being now an extensive grower of fruit, hops, grain, etc.  He married in 1872 Helen G., daughter of Darwin E. Fay, Oswego county, and they are the parents of two children:  Philadelphia Stuart Menteth, and Isabella Stuart Menteth, students of Granger Place School.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Merrill, F. B., Canandaigua, is a native of Belknap county, N.H., and came to Ontario county in 1887 from New York, where he had been a dealer in malt, hops and barley.  He established a market of the same products in this town, in which he is still engaged.  In 1891 Mr. Merrill purchased the old road bed of the Geneva and Southwestern Railroad from Geneva to Naples, and in the early part of 1892 the Middlesex Valley Railroad Company was incorporated, and the work of construction was commenced in June, 1892.  The road from Stanley to Naples was completed and opened to the public August 29, 1892. Mr. Merrill is president of the construction company that built the road and resident director of the railroad company; he is also president of the Central City Water Works of Syracuse.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

 
Metcalf, J. Henry, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua June 25, 1857, a son of Jabez H., a lawyer of that town admitted to the bar in 1843.  The whole life of our subject has been spent in this village, where he was educated in the Canandaigua Academy.  When he was eighteen years of age he began to read law in his father's office, and was admitted to the bar in 1878, passing his examination in June about a week before reaching his majority.  He opened an office in this village, and has ever since enjoyed a lucrative practice.  January 2, 1890, Mr. Metcalf was appointed by Governor Hill county judge of Ontario, to fill vacancy caused by the resignation of Secretary of State Rice.  The following fall he was elected to the position over Dwight C. Backenstose of Geneva, his term expiring in 1896.  He is a director of the Canandaigua National Bank.



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