"L" Surname Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Ira E. Lacy
, Gorham, a native of Naples, was born June 7, 1849, son of John, a son of Somers Lacy, who was a native of Albany county, and married Alphia Andrews, by whom he had four sons and four daughters.  He died in 1871, aged eighty-four years.  John Lacy was born in Albany county in 1809, and at sixteen came with his parents to Naples.  He was twice married, first to Isabelle Hoyt, by whom he had two children.  She died in 1840, and in 1841 he married Julia A. Vosburgh, whose maiden name was Vinton.  She was born May 182 1815, a daughter of Howard and Betsey (Bryant) Vinton, of Connecticut.  They had eight children.  Mr. Vinton died in Monroe county in 1833.  The family then moved to Naples, where in 1872 Mrs. Vinton died.  By his second wife Mr. Lacy had one child, Ira E.  Mr. Lacy settled on a farm in Naples, where he lived for thirty-two years.  In 1871 he came to Gorham, where he died in 1876.  Ira E. was educated in Naples Academy.  In connection with farming he followed teaching for many years.  In 1874 he married Rosella S. Witter, born in Centerfield, December 3, 1853.  They have five children:  Isabelle J.; Mary A.; John W.; Frank H.; and Leo A.  Mr. Lacy owns the farm of his father, upon which he has made many improvements.  He is at present engaged in breeding pure Chester White and Suffolk swine.  His place is known as the Maple Avenue farm.  He is a Republican and a member of the Reed's Corners Grange.  Mrs. Lacy is a daughter of A. S. Witter, a son of Lewis P., whose father, Isaac, was born in Connecticut in 1757, and married Margaret Owen, by whom he had seven children.  He was a tailor by trade.  In 1806 he came to Gorham and settled the farm now owned by Lewis P. Witter.  He died in 1843.  Lewis P. was born in Orange county, December 26, 1803, and came with his parents to Gorham.  He was twice married, first to Margaret Trotter, October 23, 1823, by whom he had four sons and one daughter.  She died January 14, 1868, and May 18, 1870, he married Hannah, daughter of Ezekiel Birdseye.  A. S. Witter studied medicine in Rochester, and settled in Branchport, where he practiced his profession.  In 1860 he settled in Gorham and has since followed farming.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Hiram Ladd, Victor, was born in Victor, in the northeastern part, January 9, 1823. He received a common school and academic education, and has always been a farmer. October 1, 1846, he married Mary J., daughter of John and Sally Riddell of this town, and they had two children: John M., who married, September 20, 1875, Mary E., daughter of Philo B. and A. Maria (Henry) Chapman of Hopewell, and they have had four children: Howard, who died at the age of three and a half years; Inez C., Jean P., and Fannie survive. The second son, Smith R., was well educated, like his brother John M. and married Alida Carpenter of Titusville, Pa., and had two sons: Sylvester C. and Smith R., jr. Their father died December 27, 1881. Hiram Ladd's father, John, was born in Massachusetts June 6, 1786, and came to this place in 1816. He married Betsey Olney, and had nine children who grew to maturity: Alvira, Mahala, Cassandana, William, Hiram, Calista, Adeline E., Smith and Jannette. Mr. Ladd has always been an active temperance leader, and fearless writer of prohibition sentiment since the party organization in the State and United States. Mr. Ladd was honored by the Prohibition party of the state in being elected delegate to the National Convention at Pittsburg in 1884, and his district nominated him for member of assembly the same year. In 1886 he received the nomination of member of Congress from his district. He also was delegate to the National Convention of the Prohibition party at Indianapolis in 1888. Mrs. John M. Ladd's father, Philo B. Chapman, was born in Hopewell, Ontario county, January 28, 1825, and was educated in the public school and Phelps Union School. In 1850 he married A. Maria Henry of that town, and had one daughter, Mary E. Mr. John M. Ladd is an active farmer of Victor, he is also a noted Shropshiredown sheep breeder in company with W. B. Osbourne, since about the year 1887. Their sales extend all over the country.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Clarence C. Lamport, Canandaigua, was born in Geneva in 1854, a son of Bishop, who was born in Troy in 1823, and came to this country when ten years of age. He was a tinsmith by trade. He died in 1891 leaving two children: E. Harry, a dentist of New York city; and Clarence C. The latter was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and after leaving school went into the plumbing establishment of Greely & Davenport to learn the trade, which he has ever since followed. In 1887 Mr. Lamport began his present business in Canandaigua, which is located in the Atwater block. He has now control of the best work of the village, and has just completed the plumbing and steam heating of the new Dwyer block, and also the heating apparatus of the Canandaigua Hotel. He carries a complete stock of everything needed in plumbing, steam and hot water heating, and is always prepared to do new work on shortest notice. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294 F. & A. M. In 1891 Mr. Lamport was appointed sanitary inspector on the Board of Health in this village.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Ambert T. Lane
, Victor, was born in the town of Farmington, Ontario county, October 16, 1854.  He received a common school and academic education.  July 1, 1878, he married Amelia, daughter of Hiram and Apma (Dickinson) Parks, of Victor.  They had two daughters, Laura E. and Florence M.  Mr. Lane's father, Jacob, was born in Montgomery county in the year 1793.  His parents went to Canada, and in the War of 1812 he espoused the American cause, and came to Ontario county.  The property was confiscated there, and he began anew a good American patriot.  He married Rhoda Grinnell, and had six children:  Andrew; George; Helen; Charles; Isaac; and Ambert T.  Mrs. Lane's father, Hiram Parks, was born at Scipio, Cayuga county April 15 1803; he married Apma Dickinson; she was formerly of Connecticut.  They had eight children:  Eveline; Edwin; Eliza; Maryette; Abigail; Thomas; Amelia; and Laura J.  For many years, Mr. Parks was an elder in the Presbyterian Church in Victor.  Mr. Parks' father, Simon, came on foot from New England to Scipio, Cayuga county, and married there.  In 1812 he moved with his family to Victor.  In 1814 he and his wife, Abigail, joined the Presbyterian Church in Victor by letter.  He was a deacon in that church until his death.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lane, Harland H., Canandaigua, was born in Tioga county May 15, 1863, and was educated in Candor Academy. His first occupation after leaving school was as a clerk for the D. L. & W. R. R. Co. at Candor. He remained there until 1882, then spent one year at Hornellsville with the Untied States Express Company, and in 1883 came to Canandaigua to open an office for the United States Company.  He was the cashier for them until 1886, when their office was closed here, and Mr. Lane had charge of the electric light for the Excelsior Company of Brooklyn until they sold their interests and then he was engaged as secretary of the Canandaigua Water Works Company, which office he still holds. January, 1891, he was elected village treasurer, and re-elected in 1892 without opposition.  He is also the secretary and treasurer for the Canandaigua Fire Department. He was president of the Merrill Hose Company for two years and secretary for three years. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge F. & A. M. No. 294 K. of P.; and of Rochester Lodge B.P.O. Elks No. 24. Mr. Lane married in 1885 Minnie Howard, of Canandaigua, and they have two children:  William Howard, and Mary.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lane, the late Jacob, father of Ellen M., was born in the town of Charlestown, Va., June 25, 1797, and moved with his parents to Canada sometime before the war of 1812.  The family espoused the cause of the Americans. In consequence of this event their property was confiscated.  The family came to the United States, locating in the town of Victor. Jacob, her father, enlisted in the American army, and was honorably discharged at its close. He married, and had six children:  Andrew J., George W., Ellen M., who is a noted school teacher; Charles L., Isaac B., and Ambrose T.  Mr. Lane died December 24, 1889. Ellen M. resides on the old homestead in the town of Farmington.  Her grandfather, Thomas, married and had nine children:  Peter, Jacob, John, Eleanor, Hannah, Catharine, Margaret, Betsey and Mary.  Miss Lane has taught school eight years and was the first assistant in the Union School of Canandaigua, but recently resigned to care for an invalid at home. Mrs. Jacob Lane died October 24, 1889.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

David G. Lapham
, Canandaigua, was born in Manchester, January 17, 1839, a son of Anson S., a farmer of that town.  Our subject attended the common schools of Manchester, and later fitted himself for college at Palmyra Union School and Macedon Academy.  He entered Yale College in 1860, graduating in 1864.  That year his father died and he conducted the farm for his mother three years, and then entered the office of Senator E. G. Lapham, with whom he read law for two years and was admitted to the bar in 1869.  He spent one year longer in the senator's office and then opened an office for himself in the Hubbell block.  He has since enjoyed a lucrative practice, and is considered one of the leading members of the profession in his county.  In 1892 he was nominated on the Republican ticket for surrogate and the Democrat party recognizing his popularity, made no nomination in opposition.  In 1885 he was elected surrogate for the term of six years, expiring in 1891.  He has held the office of town clerk for two terms and has been village clerk and attorney.  He is a trustee of the Ontario Orphan Asylum and treasurer of the Red Jacket Club.  Mr. Lapham married in 1872 Emily, daughter of Jonas H. Wheeler of Canandaigua, and they have two daughters:  Anne Edith and Emily Marian.



From Ontario County Journal 10 January 1890


Elbridge Gerry Lapham
was born in the town of Farmington, October 18th, 1814. His father, John Lapham, who was judge of Ontario county in its early days, was a Quaker. Elbridge's early life was spent on the farm, and his early schooling was confined to the district school. Later he entered Canandaigua Academy, where he became the classmate of Hon. Stephen A. Douglass, and after his graduation, he studied civil engineering. He followed that profession for a time with success on the Michigan Southern railroad, but abandoned it for the law. He pursued his law studies in the office of Jared Wilson in this village, and was admitted in 1844. He at once went to the front in that professions and was soon the leader of the Ontario county bar, while as a trial lawyer, he ranked with the foremost in the state. The first office he ever held was that of member of the constitutional convention of 1867, acting as chairman of the committee on canals. He came from Democratic stock, and was an active supporter of that party until 1848. He favored the Wilmot proviso, became a Barn Burner, and was a member of the Buffalo convention that nominated Martin Van Buren for president. Having separated from the Democratic party on the issue of slavery, it was but a step to Republicanism, and when the Republican party was the first formed, he became one of its warmest supporters. He was a powerful and convincing speaker on the stump, and his work for the new party in that line was very effective. Mr. Lapham held no political office until 1874, when about six hundred of his fellow citizens united in addressing to him a letter urging him to accept the nomination for Congress. He accepted, was elected, and served in the 44th, 45th and 46th congresses, and was elected to the 47th, but before the time to take his seat, he was elected to the higher branch of congress to succeed Roscoe Conkling. In the 44th congress, he was on the committees on private land claims; in the 45th was on committees on judiciary; in the 46th was committee on judiciary, heading the Republican representation on that committee; was one of the managers on the part of the House of Representatives in the impeachment trial of W. W. Belknap, secretary of war; was chairman of the select committee appointed to investigate the election frauds of 18-- in the State of North Carolina. In senate, he was on committees on privileges and elections, foreign relations, patents, transportation routes to the seaboard; chairman of select committee on woman suffrage, joint select committee on honoring the memory of James A. Garfield; chairman committee on fish and fisheries; member of sub-committee of committee on privileges and elections in regard to alleged election outrages at Danville, Va.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lapham, George E., Farmington, was born in Farmington, October 11, 1848. He was educated in the public schools, Macedon and Belville Academies and is a farmer, also makes a specialty of the milk business for the city of Rochester.  September 20, 1870, he married Ida M., daughter of George and Hannah M. Loomis of his native town.  They have four children:  Dircie M., Mary B., Leslie D,. and George E., jr.  Mr. Lapham's father, Elias H., was born in this town in 1808. He was educated in the public schools and Canandaigua Academy, and was a farmer.  He married Dircie A. Brown of this town, and they had three children:  Helen D., died in infancy; David B., born July 2, 1837, and died May 16, 1889; and George E.  His mother died May 2, 1859, aged forty-six years.  His grandfather, Isaac Lapham, was born in Berkshire county, Mass., in 1777. He came here and located north of the Friend's meeting-house. He married Mary, sister of Jared Smith, and they had eight children:  Epephras, Elias H., Anson S., Ambrose S., Isaac S., Jared S., Lucina S., and Mary E. His great-grandfather, David Lapham, was a native of Massachusetts, and his great-grandmother, Judith, died in 1846 aged eight-eight years.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Nathan D. Lapham, present District Attorney of Ontario County, was born in Macedon, Wayne County, November 14, 1871, the son of DeWitt C. and Amelia J. (Finley) Lapham. He was educated in the schools of his native village and graduated from Macedon Academy. He attended Cornell Law School, graduating in the Class of 1895. December 26th of the same year he was admitted to the bar and established himself in the practice the following Spring at Lyons, being associated with Clyde W. Knapp, present County Judge of Wayne County. This partnership was dissolved after a period of two years. Mr. Lapham practiced independently at Lyons until 1902, when he sold his interests to B. S. Rudd. On November 13, 1904, he moved to Geneva, where he has since practiced law and is one of the city's best known attorneys. For a number of terms he has served the County in the capacity of District Attorney.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James E. Larkins
, Hopewell, was born in England in 1820.  He is one of seven children of Henry and Ann (Coats) Larkins, natives of England, who came to New York in 1836 and settled in Genesee county, afterward moving to Ontario county, where in 1843 Mrs. Larkins died.  Mr. Larkins afterward went to Michigan, where he died in 1865.  James E. came to America with his parents, was educated in the common schools, and is a general and successful farmer.  He married Cornelia H. Wells, a native of Hartford, Conn., and they had two children:  Edward W., who is in Colorado, and Emma C., wife of James Swartz, of Dundee.  He always has been an active Republican, was justice of the peace eleven years, and assessor six years.  He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church at Chapinville, and Mr. Larkin is at present one of the trustees of the church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James H. LaRue
, Manchester, was born May 28, 1838.  His ancestors were originally from France.  Mr. LaRue possesses a farm with his brother, Alvin E. LaRue, of seventy-five acres in the town of Manchester.  He was a member of Company D, One Hundred and Eleventh Reg. N. Y. Vols., and is a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  His ancestors on both his father's and mother's side participated in the War of 1812.  He married Martha Vanderbilt; they have no children.  Alvin E. LaRue was born August 15, 1852.  He married Isadore Vanderbilt, and they have three children.  He is part owner of the farm, and both he and his brother are staunch Republicans.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George W. Latham
, Gorham, a native of Canandaigua, was born December 17, 1843, a son of Warren C., whose father was an early settler of Oneida county, coming there from Glasgow, Scotland, with his brother, who settled in California.  Warren C. Latham was born in Oneida county in 1801. For many years he carried the mail on the Buffalo and Albany route.  He married Sarah Youngs, a native of Gorham, by whom he had two sons and seven daughters.  About 1835 he settled in Canandaigua and drove a stage between that place and Geneva for six years, then engaged in farming in Gorham where he remained until his death in 1884.  Mrs. Latham now resides in Kent county, Mich.  George W. married in 1864 a Miss Augusta P. Lewis of Gorham, born June 27, 1837.  She is a daughter of Gustavus A. Lewis of Gorham, who was a son of Ebenezer of Revolutionary fame, who early settled in Gorham.  He was twice married and by his second wife had three daughters and one son.  Gustavus A. Lewis was born in 1801, and married Lany Manley of Amsterdam, by whom he had ten children.  Mr. Latham owns and has improved the original farm of A. A. Lewis on which he now lives.  He is a Republican and has been trustee and deacon of the Congregational church many years, also superintendent of Sunday school fifteen years, and leader of Bible class ten years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Aldrich J. Latting
, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell in 1859, son of Jacob, born in New Paltz, August 3, 1822, whose father was John, a native of Dutchess county, born in 1790.  When a young man John followed teaching several winters.  He married Elizabeth Van Norstrand of Dutchess county, by whom he had twelve children, nine of whom grew to maturity, and at present three are living.  During the winter of 1822-23 John Latting came to Hopewell Centre, then moved to Farmington where he remained two years; when he returned to Hopewell and settled on the farm now owned by Jacob Latting, and his brother, John H., and situated in the northwest corner of this town.  Here he lived until his death in 1866.  His wife died in 1856.  Jacob was reared a farmer and has always followed that occupation.  He married Lydia H. McLouth of Farmington, by whom he has two children:  Aldrich J. and a daughter, Emogene, wife of Frank A. Ingraham, who resides in Cortland, N. Y., and owns part of the old farm.  Jacob Latting is a Prohibitionist.  His parents were Quakers and he is a birthright member, and attends South Farmington church.  A. J. Latting married Emma Knowls November 25, 1885, by whom he has two children:  Mabel L. and Blanche E.  Mr. Latting cast his first vote for Garfield.  He afterwards voted for Cleveland, and is now a Prohibitionist.  He is a member of E. K. O. R. of Manchester, and has also been master of Manchester Grange No. 501.  He and his wife united with the First Baptist church of Manchester, April 17, 1892.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John W. Lauder, Victor, was born on the old homestead November 24, 1858, was educated in the public schools and Lima Seminary, and is a farmer.  December 30, 1883, he married Cora C., daughter of Charles and Eliza Marquis of Victor.  They have five children:  Pearl A., Ruth E., C. Maud, Erma F., and John A.  Mr. Lauder's father, John A., was born in the town of Florida, Montgomery county, August 21, 1821; he too was a farmer.  In September, 1855, he married Ann Bowerman of Schenectady county, and they had one son, John W.  Mr. Lauder's father died December 3, 1883, and his mother resides with him on the old homestead.  His grandfather, James, and his grandmother, Jane, came from Scotland and located in Florida, where his father was born.  The ancestors of the family are Scotch and German.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lee, Father Patrick, Clifton Springs, was born in Ireland March 6, 1818.  He was liberally educated in the High schools of Ireland, and at the University of Worcester, Mass., and St. Joseph College, Buffalo, N.Y. He was ordained June 30, 1856. Father Lee has been stationed at East and West Bloomfield and his first mission was at Victor. He was stationed here in 1862, having now had charge of the Clifton Springs church and mission for over thirty years.  Father Lee is a gentleman of broad and liberal views and of sound judgment.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Roswell M. Lee
, a native of East Bloomfield, was born September 20, 1855.  He has always been a farmer and owns about 118 acres.  Since 1879 he has been a successful breeder of American Merino sheep, and keeps registered stock.  He is a member of the "American Merino Sheep Association."  Also for the last few years he has been engaged in the sale of agricultural implements, Walker's fertilizer manufactured at Phelps, and Keystone wire fence.  Mr. Lee is a Democrat and is at present highway commissioner, and has acted in that capacity for two years.  He has also been deputy sheriff three years.  March 7, 1878, Mr. Lee married Ella A., daughter of Russell W. Gooding of East Bloomfield, and they have had four children:  Bessie M. (deceased); Seth R.; Hester A.; and Pauline G.  The parents of our subject were Seth L. Lee, born in East Bloomfield in 1823, and Sarah Peck, a native of West Bloomfield, to whom were born three sons and five daughters.  Mr. Lee owned 238 acres of land in East Bloomfield.  In politics he was a Republican.  His death occurred March 20, 1875, and his wife now resides in Canandaigua at the age of sixty-five years.  The father of Seth L. was Major Seth L. Lee, a native of Massachusetts and son of Captain George Lee.  The wife of Major Lee was Sallie M., daughter of Benjamin Wheeler.  Mr. Lee came to East Bloomfield about 1800, and there owned about 1,000 acres of land, a grist-mill and saw-mill, and was a large wool grower.  Mr. Lee died in 1864, and his wife in 1870.



From Shortsville Enterprise 5 March 1914

James J. LeFevre, son of Anthony and Sarah LeFevre, was born in Aardenburg, Holland, on October 15, 1867. During the year 1880, James came to America with his parents, three brothers and three sisters and located on a farm in Millers Corners, now called Ionia. This was only a 67-acre farm and not being large enough to employ father and three sons, James, at the age of 17 years, hired out to work for Samuel D. Young, of Farmington, for eight months. After that he was employed by the month for different farmers around Millers Corners during the summer and went to school during the winter months. During the winter of 1888, he learned telegraphy at Millers Corners, and on April 1, 1889, went to work as baggageman at Macedon, N. Y., for the New York Central railroad. In September, 1889, he asked to be transferred to Brighton, N. Y., where he was baggageman and clerk for two and a half years. In the mean time his parents moved to Rochester and his new location enabled him to live at home. Mr. LeFevre came to Shortsville on February 28, 1894, where he was made ticket agent and telegraph operator for the New York Central which position he now occupies. He has made an upright and reliable citizen and is always ready to labor for the advancement of the Parlor Village. He is a member of Shortsville Tent, No. 119, Knights of the Maccabees, having served as Commander of the Tent; also a Past Grand of Parlor Village Lodge, No. 88, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Shortsville; a member of Parlor Village Rebekah Lodge, No. 435, of Shortsville, having been degree captain since the institution of this lodge; and a member of the Shortsville Methodist Episcopal church, having served as its chorister for the past 15 years. Mr. LeFevre married Miss Elizabeth Weitzel, a daughter of Henry and Johanna Weitzel of Mendon, N. Y., during the year of 1892. Four children have blessed their union.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Legerwood, Seneca, was born in Roxboroughshire, Scotland, June 4, 1825. He attended school there when a boy and learned the blacksmith trade. He came to the United States in 1847, locating in Gorham for one year, and then came to Hall's Corners, where he conducted a blacksmith business over twelve years. He then purchased a farm and has been one of Seneca's successful farmers. March 13, 1861, he married Margaret A. Rippey of Seneca, and they had two children, John A. and Mary E. John was educated in the public schools and is a farmer. He married Mary E. Sattler of Gorham, and they have a son and daughter, Anna B. and George W. The daughter, Mary E., presides over her father's house. Mrs. Legerwood died September 18, 1889, mourned by a bereaved husband and many friends. Mr. Legerwood is now a retired farmer living at Hall's Corners.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Peter Leighton
, Canandaigua, was born in Scotland and came to the United States at the age of twenty-two; in 1870 he was employed as salesman by James D. Paterson who was at that time engaged in the dry goods business in this village.  The following year he became engaged as salesman with the firm of Sibley, Lindsay & Curr of Rochester N. Y., with whom he remained until 1880, when he associated himself with Andrew Johnston of that city, and bought out his former employer, Mr. Paterson in Canandaigua, when the firm of Leighton & Johnston continued in business until 1889, when Mr. Johnston retiring the business has been since conducted by Mr. Leighton alone, occupying a building 20 x 100 feet of two floors and basement devoted to general dry goods, fancy goods, cloaks, draperies, etc.  In 1877 he married Jeannie Hall, a native of Scotland, and they have three children:  Frederick, Henry and Helen.  Mr. Leighton has long been one of the trustees of the First Baptist Church and is also president of the Vanderbilt Sash Balance Company, which was organized in 1892 with a capital of $10,000 for the manufacture and sale of spring sash balances.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Leonard, Charles D., Geneva, was born in London, Canada, June 18, 1867, and came to the Untied States with his parents when less than a year old.  They located in Rochester, where Charles D. was educated in the public schools and in Williams's Commercial College.  Soon after the completion of his education he became interested in the nursery business. He has been a resident of Geneva four years and is secretary of the Rupert stock farm nurseries of the town of Seneca, having an office on Seneca street, Geneva.  These nurseries are celebrated for the best fruits. Mr. Leonard has entire control and charge of the large force of salesmen traveling in the United States and Canada. Mr. Leonard has recently returned from an extensive trip in Europe, where he visited the largest and best horticultural gardens in England and France, among others the famous Kew, the greatest in the world.  He has given the nursery business his closest study and attention both in Rochester and Geneva. The nursery has 450 acres.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Alfred B. Levet
, Geneva, was born in Victor, November 23, 1869, was educated in the public schools of that town and took a course in mechanical draughting at Mechanics' Institute, Rochester, and is a cabinet maker by occupation.  He is also employed quite extensively in draughting for building purposes.  October 8, 1892, he married Jennie A. Harrington of Geneva.  Mr. Levet's father, John H., was born at Islington, near London, Eng., in 1827.  He was educated there and by occupation was a piano forte maker.  He married Emma M. Barlow of his native place, coming to the United States about 1852, locating first in Rochester, afterward in Victor.  They had seven children, two died in infancy, five grew to maturity:  Oliver C. married Agnes Gould; Emily M. and Alfred B., two died after they grew to maturity, Walter J. and Alice L.  Mrs. Levet's father, Elias W. Harrington, was born in Scipio, Cayuga county, November 4, 1827.  January 15, 1850, he married Marietta Doty of Columbia county, who was born November 30, 1830, and came to Geneva in 1861.  They had four children: one son, Henry S. died at eleven years of age; Lucy D. who married Alburtus B. Johnson; Sarah M. a teacher in Victor; and Jennie A.  Mr. Harrington died December 28, 1881.  Mr. Levet's father died in 1871.  Mr. Harrington's stepfather, Col. W. W. Jones, was the first white child born in Geneva and west of Utica.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Alfred George Lewis, owner of the White Springs Farm, was the only child of George Howard and Katherine Bell Lewis and was born in Buffalo July 5, 1879. He was educated in his native city and in 1898 he purchased the White Springs Farm and took up residence in Geneva. Mr. Lewis built himself a commodious home and greatly improved the buildings on the estate. He became a famous importer and breeder of Guernsey cattle, but of late years the farm has been devoted more to growing of fruits and agricultural crops. Mr. Lewis organized the White Springs Farm Dairy Co. in 1905, which since that time has been the principal source of supply of the milk used by the people of Geneva. Mr. Lewis is one of Geneva's wealthiest citizens and there are very few business concerns in which he has not an interest. He is prominent in both the civic and social life of the city and is a generous contributor to all worthy public movements. Mr. Lewis married, Sept. 29, 1903, Miss Agnes Slosson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Slosson, who is equally prominent in all public activities.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James W. Lewis, Gorham, a native of Gorham, was born October 10, 1852.  His father, Eugene, was a son of Sylvester, a native of Northumberland, who married Catharine Dubois, by whom he had ten children.  He served in the War of 1812, and was one of the first settlers of Gorham, where he died in 1873, and his wife in 1881.  Eugene was born in Gorham, April 19, 1823.  In 1849 he married Rebecca Wilson, a native of Gorham and daughter of James and Hannah Wilson, of Gorham. They had two sons and a daughter, James W. being the only one living.  Eugene was a Republican, and a member of Rushville Lodge No. 377 F. & A. M.  He died August 12, 1891, and his wife survives him.  James W. was educated in Rushville Union Schools.  He and his mother own 160 acres of land.  In 1875 he married Sarah Tuttle, of Canandaigua, a daughter of Henry N. and Mary A. Tuttle, who had ten children.  Mr. Tuttle was a soldier in the late war, and died August 23, 1891, and Mrs. Tuttle resides in Canandaigua.  James W. and wife have one child, Harriet P.  Mr. Lewis is a Republican in politics.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Joseph S. Lewis, familiarly known to all his acquaintances as "Captain," was born in Washington County July 7, 1803, one of four children and only son of Barnet and Mary (Stewart) Lewis. His father was a veteran of the War of 1812 and his grandfather a veteran of the Revolutionary War. While Joseph was still very young his parents moved to Madison County. When less than 17 years of age Joseph visited Geneva and was so pleased with the place that he made it his home for the next 76 years. A few years later he persuaded his parents to move to this section and they lived and died near Benton Center. Joseph's first employment was at the old Franklin House and his first business venture was the operation of a stage line between Geneva and Penn Yan. Later Delos Colvin became his partner and other towns were added to the route and a livery to the business. Mr. Lewis was a member of the first volunteer fire department of Geneva, a Leather Bucket Brigade. His leather bucket with his name on it still exists. In 1836 Captain Lewis was interested in the only boat then running on Seneca Lake and became its captain. Two years later he built and launched the first steamboat on what was then called Crooked Lake. This boat he named the Keuka, for the old Indian name of the Lake and gradually the name of the lake was changed from Crooked to Keuka. He personally commanded this boat for five years and became widely known to the traveling public throughout Central New York. During his life Capt. Lewis was connected with many business enterprises but he often said "The days spent on the Keuka on Crooked Lake were about the happiest."

Prior to and long after the Civil War Captain Lewis carried on an extensive wool business, associated with Stuart S. Cobb. This business was located on Seneca street, corner of Union Alley (the present Times building) and ran back to Seymour Alley, with offices in front and wool storage in the rear. To the day of his death Captain Lewis was considered an expert judge on the quality and value of wool. The old "wool room gang," as they chose to call themselves, was composed of Captain Lewis and Mr. Cobb and their most intimate friends, and many of the political, business, civic and social enterprises of the town at that time were organized here.

Captain Lewis was conspicuous in raising recruits for the 126th and 128th Regiments of Infantry. Lewis street was named for him. He was a charter member of the Kanadesaga Club and a lifelong Mason and in politics an ardent Democrat. He twice filled the office of village trustee and once was village president. For ten years preceding 1891 he was president of the Board of Education. He was chairman of the Board of Trustees of the First Presbyterian church and was one of the Cemetery Commissioners and a director of the Geneva National Bank,  in which he was a large stockholder. Although a bachelor Captain Lewis was a very genial, social man and most domestic in his tastes. From a very young man he always maintained his own home, living for many years in Water street, now Exchange, near the present factory of the U. S. Radiator Corporation, and when that section ceased to be residential moved to Park Place, where he lived until he died June 18, 1896. He is still remembered by many older Genevans as always alert and active, wearing a silk hat and long black cape instead of an overcoat, and carrying in his mouth an unlit cigar.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Frederick Licht
, Geneva, was born in Germany, December 27, 1825, and came to this country with his parents in 1832, locating in Brooklyn, N. Y.  He was engaged in the brewing business in Long Island for twenty-five years, and is at present vice-president of The Patent Cereals Company.  He is the patentee of the process now used by the P. C. C. in the manufacture of the different wheat and corn specialties for brewing and family use.  The P. C. C. mills were formerly located at Brooklyn, but as the business outgrew their old quarters, they removed to Geneva in 1888.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

George F. Licht, a former mayor of the city and for a long period actively connected with the affairs of the Patent Cereals Co., was born on Long Island, August 18, 1850, and was educated at the Brooklyn and Long Island schools. When sixteen years of age he entered the employ of Tiffany to learn the trade of engraving, and remained with them for ten years. He then engaged in the milling business with his father, in which he continued for the remainder of his active business life. He was one of the incorporators of the Patent Cereals Co. and for many years was its superintendent. In 1902 he was appointed by Mayor D. E. Moore as a member of the Purchasing Committee for the city, and also a member of the Fire Commission. In 1903 he was elected mayor of the city, and in 1906 Mayor A. P. Rose appointed him a member of the Fire Commission and he served for four years. Several years previous to his death, which occurred in California Jan. 19, 1928, he retired from business and removed to the Pacific Coast with his family.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Louis J. Licht, long prominent in the affairs of the Patent Cereals Co., was born on Long Island, Sept. 2, 1862. He was first connected with the Brooklyn Sugar Refining Co., where he remained five years. He then engaged in the manufacture of cereals under the firm name of Licht & Co., and in 1888 moved to Geneva where he organized the Patent Cereals Co. Mr. Licht has also been prominent in public affairs and is best known for his service on the Board of Public Works where he was a most efficient executive.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Cyrillo S. Lincoln
, lawyer of Naples, was born July 18, 1830, in South Bristol, a son of Lucius and Amelia (Fellows) Lincoln, natives of Otsego county, whose ancestors came from New London, Conn., and were of the same stock as General Lincoln of Revolutionary fame.  Subject was educated at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, and Charlottesville Academies, and at Union College, from which he graduated in 1854.  He studied law in Rochester, was admitted to the bar in 1859, and at once located at Naples in the practice of his profession, where he has enjoyed a good patronage.  He is a Republican and represented his district in the Assembly (in 1872) for four years in succession.  He married Laura A. Clark, in 1863, a sister of Noah T. Clark, of Canandaigua, and a cousin of Ex-Governor Clark.  Mrs. Lincoln's grandfather, William Clark, was a colonel under Washington in the Revolution, and one of the original purchasers of the town of Naples in 1789.  Mr. Lincoln and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.  They have two children:  Mary C., wife of A. L. Parker of Detroit, who is secretary of the Y. M. C. A.; and Spencer F., a graduate of Cornell University Law Department, and assistant editor of the North Western Law Review of St. Paul, Minn.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lincoln, Lewis C., Gorham, was born in Gorham, June 8, 1866, a son of Flavius L., a son of Henry, a son of Otis who settled on the farm on which subject resides and which has been in the family since 1804. Henry was born in Otsego county, and when a boy came to Gorham.  His wife was Louisa Wood and they had nine children.  Flavius L. was born in Gorham. His wife was Mary A. Hubbell, of Canandaigua, born December 25, 1833.  Her parents, Elisa and Nancy Hubbell, were natives of Berkshire Co., Mass., and came to Canandaigua about 1812.  They have three sons and seven daughters. Mr. Hubbell was a lieutenant in the War of 1812 and died in 1865 aged eight-seven.  His wife died in 1873 aged eighty-four. To Mr. Lincoln and wife were born two sons, Lewis C. and Burr W.  He died in Gorham March 25, 1885. Lewis C. was educated in Canandaigua Academy and in 1888 he married Lillian L., daughter of S. B. Douglas, and they had one child, Gertrude M., who died aged two years.  Mrs. Lincoln died September 3, 1891.  Mr. Lincoln is a Republican and is justice of peace. Burr W. Lincoln was born April 26, 1868, and educated in Canandaigua Academy.  He resided on the old homestead until his death September, 1887.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Samuel Grant Lincoln
, Geneva, was born in Geneva September 11, 1868.  He was educated in the public schools, and since April 1, 1890, has held the position of messenger in the Geneva National Bank.  Mr. Lincoln's father, George, was born February 19, 1817, at Geneva, and was educated in the public schools of his day.  He married Rachael Thompson of this place and they had nine children:  Jennie A.; Mary E.; Louisa; Lavenia; Caroline; George jr.; Harriet; Frederick R.; and Samuel Grant.  Two died in infancy, three in their teens, one at thirty-four and one at thirty-six.  Only two survive:  Jennie A. who married Garrett S. Duffin of New York and has two daughters, Irene and Bijou; and the subject of this sketch.  The grandfather, Peter, was born a slave in Virginia in 1771.  He was first owned by a Mr. Park, and afterwards by Robert S. Rose.  Rose and Lawson, who were brothers-in-law, brought their slaves north, locating in Seneca and Ontario counties, 200 in number.  On one occasion a man was sent for Peter's cradle.  Peter refused to let it go.  Sent for by his owner and asked why he refused, he said because he was held responsible for his tools.  His master struck him with his cane at this answer, and Peter said he should not do it again as he was going to leave.  His master said, "Go, and I will give you a new hat in the bargain."  George, the father, died January 13, 1893, and Rachel, the mother, June 21, 1880.  She was born November 26, 1826.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lindner, Frank, Clifton Springs, October 8, 1856.  He is engaged in a meat market, having succeeded his father who inaugurated the business here many years ago.  Mr. Lindner is erecting a new block at Clifton Springs at present, into which he will soon move his business.  He married Annie Harbor, and they have one daughter. Mr. Lindner has served as inspector of elections, trustee of the first company, etc., and is a staunch Democrat. Edward Lindner was born at Clifton Springs, August 20, 1885.  He is associated with his brother in the business, conducting the upper market. His wife was Barbara Nicket, of Rochester, and they have two children. Mrs. Lindner died in February, 1892.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William Llewellyn
, Clifton Springs, was born in England November 17, 1841.  He learned the trade of confectioner and baker, and in April, 1865, came to this country.  After being connected in different localities with his trade he established in 1887 a general commission business at Clifton Springs; the firm being W. & W. H. Llewellyn, and composed of himself and his son, William H.  He has served as trustee of corporation and school and is identified with the Masons.  He married Julia Winifred Cox of Gloucester, Eng.  W. H. Llewellyn is also a partner in the banking house of Jackson & Llewellyn.  He married Miss Grace L. Briggs of this village May 4, 1893.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lobdell, Burton H., Victor, was born on the old homestead three miles southeast of the village March 18, 1846. He was educated in the public schools and Eastman's Commercial College, Rochester, and is a farmer. March 17, 1873, he married Amelia Ketchum, of Victor, and they have two children:  Nelson L. and Marion F. Mr. Lodell's father, Jacob L., was also born on the old homestead in 1819.  In 1845 he married Joanna Farr, formerly of Canandaigua, and they have four children: Burton H., Byron J., Oliver L., and Frances M.  Byron J. is in Los Angeles, California. Mr. Lobdell's grandfather was born in Stockbridge, Mass., March 14, 1771, and came to this town at an early day. He was the first white man that wintered in the town, and was the first supervisor of Victor, was justice of the peace several years, and was a man of good judgment. He married Hannah Boughton, who was born April 6, 1775, and had fourteen children. He died November 12, 1847, and his wife April 6, 1846.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Long, Leonard, Farmington, was born in the kingdom of Wirtemberg, Germany, September 17, 1833, and was educated in the common schools.  In 1850 he married Catherine Schmidt of his native place, and came to the United States in September, 1860, and soon after located in Farmington.  They had two children:  Rose, who died when she was four and one-half years old; and Leonard, jr., born October 8, 1876, is a bright farmer, and is now a student in the Friends' College at Union Springs.  Mr. and Mrs. Long own a splendid home and farm, the result of sobriety, energy, good judgment and industry. Mr. Long is a Democrat.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Loomis, Farmington, was born in the town of Bloomfield, Hartford county, Conn., December 7, 1818, and came with his parents to Onondaga county when a child.  At about the age of six years he came to Farmington.  He was educated in the district schools, has always followed farming, and has been identified with the prosperity of the town, of which he is one of the oldest inhabitants.  Mr. Loomis has been supervisor of the town one term, and also highway commissioner.  October 19, 1842, he married Hannah M., daughter of Benjamin and Lavina A. Ketchum of Farmington, and they had six children: Aurelia L., who married LeGrand L. Morse, who is a farmer and school commissioner; Benjamin H., who is a farmer in Mertensia; Ida M., who married George E. Lapham; Georgiana, who died at the age of eighteen years; Leslie G., a produce dealer of Victor; and Charles P., who died of scarlet fever only five days apart from his sister, who died of the same malady. Mrs. Loomis died suddenly August 25, 1892.  Mr. Loomis's father, George, was born in Connecticut in 1784, and married Aurelia Palmer. They had four children:  Eunice, Charlotte, George, and Jerome.  One of his ancestors, Captain John Loomis, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  The Loomis family came from England at an early day with the Rev. John Wareham, locating in the east.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Loomis, Henry H., Geneva, was born in Geneva on the old homestead near the experiment station, January 14, 1817, and was educated in the district schools of that day and Geneva Lyceum. He is a farmer and real estate operator, owning many thousand acres of land in the Western States.  In 1836 he purchased from the government in Michigan at $1.25 per acre, also in 1844 from the Michigan Central Railway scrip at thirty-eight cents on the dollar for many acres. In 1849 he began to buy the bounty land warrants of the Mexican war, continuing doing so for many years. In 1852 he began to purchase in western Texas bounty land warrants, locating them in Michigan.  Mr. Loomis’s father, Jerome, was born at Lebanon, Conn., in 1756, and came to this State June 1, 1788.  In 1798 he married Elizabeth Tippetts of this State, and they had twelve children:  Jerome, Martha, Irene, William, Anson C., Elizabeth, Homer, Stephen T., Henry H., Mary J. (who died in infancy), Mary J. 2d, and Cordelia C.  The first home was built where Mr. Loomis and sisters reside, near the experiment station on the Pre-emption road in 1793.  Mr. Loomis’s father, Jerome, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, under General Stark, and helped to capture General Burgoyne.  He died in April, 1840, and his wife in 1857.  Henry H. Loomis has never married.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Leslie G. Loomis
, Victor, was born in Farmington, Ontario county, April 9, 1857.  He was educated in the public schools, Canandaigua Academy, and was a farmer until 1877, when he came to Victor and entered the employ of E. S. Norton as clerk until 1882.  He then began business on his own account in company with Wilber C. Woodworth, under the firm name of Loomis & Woodworth.  They are doing a business this year of nine hundred and fifty thousand dollars, furnishing the best market for farm produce in this whole region.  June 4, 1884, he married Della M., daughter of Theodore and Clarinda Hunt of Newark, and they have two children:  Leslie G. jr. and Harry H.  Mr. Loomis's father, George, was born in Bloomfield, Conn., about the year of 1818, and came to this State with his parents when about five years old, and married Hannah M. Ketchum of this State.  They had six children:  Aurelia E.; Benjamin H.; Ida M.; Leslie G.; Georgiana; and Charles P.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Mariette Lord, was born in Gorham, and was reared on the old homestead where she now resides, and educated in the common schools.  She donated quite largely in the building of the Middlesex Valley Railroad.  Her father was Ethan Lord, a native of Sharon, Litchfield county, Conn., born December 24, 1798.  In 1827 he married Paulina Parsons, a native of Sharon, and to them were born two children:  Mariette and Flora.  In 1830 Mr. Lord came to Yates county, and in 1831 purchased and settled on the farm in Gorham now owned by M. R. Boardman, and in 1835 moved on the farm now owned by his daughter.  Mr. Lord made his own property.  In politics, he was a Whig, afterward a Republican.  He died in Gorham in 1871 and his wife in 1892, aged eighty-six years.  His father was John Lord, a native of Sharon, where he died.  His wife was a Miss Everett.  They had ten children.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lucas, Holmes C., Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, August 15, 1818, a son of Zebina Lucas, who came to this town from Vermont in 1815, among the earliest settlers of the town.  He owned a farm about five miles south of the village, and was a man of prominence in this town, having held the office of justice of the peace nineteen years. He was supervisor from 1840 to 1846.  He married Laura Ingram, daughter of Benjamin Ingram, who settled on the lake shore at Monteith's Point, then known as Truman's Point, earlier than Mr. Lucas.  Zebina had two children.  The youngest, Alonzo, died in October, 1892, aged seventy-one.  Our subject, H. C., has always been a farmer, but in 1858 he moved into the village, where he established a business for dealing in grain, wool, hops, etc.  He is doing a very successful business, handling some years as high as 800,000 to 1,000,000 pounds of wool.  He is still in active business, but does not exert himself to drive it as he did years ago. In 1867, Mr. Lucas secured subscription for enough stock to have the Merchants' Union Express Company open an office here. This was merged into the American Express Company after a few years, and Mr. Lucas has ever since been the representative of the company in the town.  Mr. Lucas was the builder of the Canandaigua elevator, and was for many years the owner of the Lucas block.  He conducts a farm of 130 acres in Gorham besides attending to his other interests. In 1840 he married Sylva Penoyer by whom he had two children, one of whom, Laura, died aged twenty.  The other child, Zebina, is the assistant agent in the express office.  Mrs. Lucas died in 1844, and he married second, in 1847, Fanny S., daughter of Squire Pratt, of Gorham, and they have one daughter.  Mr. Lucas was chairman of the School Board when it was decided to build the new Union school building, and the town was bonded for $40,000 to erect the building. Mr. Lucas negotiated these bonds and sold them at a premium, and paid them up within the specified time.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Zebina Lucas, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, April 24, 1843, a son of H. C. Lucas. His early life was spent on the farm, and he received his education in the common schools and at Canandaigua Academy. After leaving school he entered the law office of Smith & Williams in Canandaigua, where he was at the outbreak of the war. In September, 1862, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-eighth N. Y. Vols., with whom he was at Suffolk, Portsmouth and other places. In the spring of 1863 he was assigned on detached service and went on duty as clerk in the provost marshal's office in Norfolk, Va., remaining about two years. Returning, he spent a year in New York and then returned to his home in Canandaigua, where he has since been employed in the American Express office as deputy for his father, H. C. Lucas. In 1880 he married E. M. Norton of this town, and they have one son, Fred Z.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Lutze, Dr. F. H., Canandaigua, was born in Bevergern, Province of Westphalia, Prussia, and came to this country, where he enlisted in the First New York Vol. Eng. Corps, November 16, 1861.  He was discharged November 16, 1864 at Varina, Va.  He is a graduate of the New York Homeopathic Medical College of New York.  He has the clinic for nervous diseases and the diseases of children in the Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital on Cumberland street, and the clinic of digestive, renal and nervous diseases in the Brooklyn Eastern District Homeopathic Dispensary, 194 South 3d Street, between Briggs and Roebling streets.  He translated Hahnemann's essay on the "Repetition of the Homeopathic Remedy" from the German into English; also "Antipsonic Remedies"; "Intercurrent Remedies for Chronic Diseases"; and "Remedies for Disturbances of the Antipsonic Cure" from the German of Dr. C. von Boenninghausen.  These were all published in the Homeopathic Physician, a journal edited by Dr. E. J. Lee and W. M.  James, 1889, Vol. 9, Philadelphia.  In the same journal he published in 1890 an article entitled "Duration of Action and Antidotes of the Principal Homeopathic Remedies."  This was afterwards also published in pamphlet form and had a large circulation.  In 1891 it was translated into the Italian by Dr. G. Pampili and published in his journal Rivista Omiopalica, Roma, Maggio, 1891, a copy of which was sent to him. He has also contributed articles to the following medical magazines and journals:  The United States Medical Investigatory, The Medical Current, The Journal of Homeopathics, The Homeopathic Physician, and The Medical Advance.



From Ontario County Journal 31 December 1886; News from Reed's Corners;

Thomas Lynch was born in Middlesex, Yates Co., N. Y., in 1858. He learned the blacksmith trade of his father, and followed the business in his native town until he moved to this place in 1882. While ready to do work in any class of business pertaining to his trade, still his ambition has been to be a first-class mechanic at horseshoeing, and to gratify his taste for this work he would willingly sacrifice any other work for this alone. His business continually increases, and his patrons claim that few do work as well, and not better.



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