"F" Surname Family Sketches



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Charles Washington Fairfax was born in Geneva Sept. 2, 1862. He was educated in the Geneva public schools and then worked as a clerk in his father's wall paper store. In 1880 he formed a partnership with his brother, Geo. S. Fairfax, and they took over their father's business, giving him an opportunity to retire from active life. For a number of years the business was conducted under the firm name of Geo. S. and Chas. W. Fairfax, but in 1903, a third brother, Frank E. Fairfax, was taken into the firm. They at once built a four-story block on the corner of Castle and Linden Streets which still houses the business. Four years later they incorporated as the Geneva Wall Paper Co., with capital stock of $70,000. Mr. Geo. S. Fairfax died May 11, 1925, and Mr. Charles W. Fairfax died on Sept. 9, 1929, since which time the business has been conducted by Frank E. Fairfax. Charles W. Fairfax was active in public affairs and was alderman from the Fourth Ward and was president of the Common Council. Later he had a place on important city commissions. In 1909 he was a Republican nominee for mayor, but was defeated. He was actively associated with the affairs of Company B. and had had considerable military experience. This was used to the advantage of the city on numerous occasions when parades or celebrations had to be organized and at this, Col. Fairfax was singularly adept. His last public activity was as chairman of the celebration of the Sullivan SesquiCentennial in 1929. Mr. Fairfax died in the midst of the preparations for this event.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

John Eden Farwell, vice president and manager of the Geneva Permanent Savings and Loan Association, was born in Geneva, April 4, 1890, the son of John G. Farwell and Mary E. Goff. He was educated in the Geneva schools and graduated from Amherst College in 1913. Returning to Geneva he took a position with the Loan Association, of which his father was then manager, and after his death succeeded him. He is a member of Elks, the Masons, the Chamber of Commerce, Theta Delta Chi, Beta Sigma Clubs, Geneva Auto Club, Masonic Club, Geneva Country Club; he is a member of the finance commission of the city and a director of the Land Bank of the State of New York. His wife was Miss Olive Stryker of Phelps and they reside at 382 Washington street.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


John G. Farwell
, Geneva, son of Samuel P., was born in the town of Ischua, Cattaraugus county July 17,1861, and when twelve years old his father removed to Elmira N. Y.  John G. graduated from the grammar school and the Free Academy of the latter city, and in 1880 removed to Geneva and entered the law office of John E. Bean, esq.  He was admitted to the bar at Buffalo on June 5, 1885, and in October of the same year was united in marriage with Minnie E. Goff.  On the first of January following, he opened an office in Geneva, where he is now practicing.  He has been a justice of the peace since 1885, and was local editor of the Geneva Gazette for five years.  Mr. Farwell is also an extensive dealer in Geneva and Buffalo real estate.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Walter L. Fay, long connected with the Fay & Bowen Engine Co., was born in Auburn, Feb. 5, 1859. He was educated in the Pingry School, Elizabeth, N. J., graduating when eighteen. He immediately entered upon a business career, working for his father for a short time and in 1879 entered the employ of D. M. Osborne & Co., where he remained for four years, when he accepted a position with A. W. Stevens & Son, the senior member of this firm being a pioneer in the field of thresher and steam engine building. Mr. Fay continued with this firm for thirteen years, then started in business for himself in partnership with Ernest S. Bowen manufacturing bicycle spokes and spoke nipples. Five years later they sold out to an Eastern combination and then commenced the manufacture of gasoline engines and launches. The business was incorporated in the Fall of 1903 and in the following year removed to Geneva, where it has since been located and under a recent reorganization since Mr. Fay's retirement, is called Fay-Bow Boats, Inc.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Harrison B. Ferguson
, Canandaigua, was born in Phelps April 22, 1842, a son of John H., a native of the county, a farmer and afterwards a merchant of Orleans.  He had four children, of whom our subject was the second one.  He was educated in the common schools and at Lima Seminary, and after leaving school spent two years in his father's store, and August 22, 1862, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment N. Y. Vols., and served with them until December 25, 1864, when he received his discharge from the army and entered the Ordnance Bureau of the War Department at Washington, where he was employed until October 1, 1865.  He then came to Canandaigua and engaged in the insurance business.  He was also in the book business about five years.  In the fall of 1875 Mr. Ferguson was elected county treasurer, and afterwards re-elected.  He entered the employ of the First National Bank of Canandaigua as clerk, and rose to the position of cashier, which position he held until the close of the bank, and assisted in its voluntary liquidation.  He is still engaged with Mr. Munger, who was president of the bank.  He is secretary and treasurer of the Canandaigua Gas and Electric Light Companies; treasurer of Union Free School District No. 1, and secretary of the Canandaigua Cemetery Association.  Mr. Ferguson married in 1866 Ella C., daughter of Rev. Jacob A. Wades, of Orleans, and they have four children:  Clara Louise, Julia May, J. Arden and Harry W.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robert B. Ferguson, Geneva, was born in Phelps, August 27, 1822, he being one of nine children of Robert and Mary (Baggerly) Ferguson, natives of Maryland. The grandfather, William, was of English descent. The father came to Phelps and settled in 1805. Robert B. married, December 5, 1855, Maria, daughter of Hiram and Mary (Knapp) Warner, of
Phelps, and they have these children: Sumner J., Mrs. Mary Belle Ottley, Alice May, who died in September, 1892; Margaret Clay, a teacher of botany in Wellesley College; Clara Ann, wife of Marshall King; and Everett Warner. Mr. Ferguson has lived for fifty years upon his farm of 200 acres, where is is a large raiser of grain and has an apple orchard of about seventeen acres, producing about 500 barrels per year.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


The late Smith Ferguson was born in Orange county in 1798. His ancestor, John Ferguson, settled in Westchester county, N. Y., in 1700, the family having in possession papers showing he was, soon after purchasing real estate, in the "Borough" of Westchester. February 12, 1824, he married Emily, daughter of Sarah Wooden and Zephaniah Townsend of Ulster county, and they had seven children: Sarah C., Amelia T., Ann A., George A., Mary I., Josephine E., and Everard D. They came to reside in this town in 1851. Their father died December 9, 1886; the mother, December 23, 1886. Sarah married Chauncey Ferguson, and died January 29, 1881; Amelia married Fayette Jones, and died May 7, 1860; Ann A. married Benjamin Perkins, and has a son and daughter; Mary I. married Herman Ferguson, and resides in Newburgh, N. Y.; Josephine E. married M. D. Skinner; Everard D., a physician in Troy, married Marion A. Farley of Crown Point, Ind., and has a son and daughter; George and Josephine reside on the homestead. The family are of English and Scotch ancestry.



From "Pioneer and General History of Geauga County." Historical Society of Geauga County, O. (Ohio), 1880.

CONSTANTINE C. FIELD was born February 18, 1813, in the township of Phelps, Ontario county, New York. He came to Concord, Geauga (now Lake) county, in the spring of 1836; removed to East Claridon in 1839 and engaged in the mercantile business. He was twice elected assessor for Claridon township; in 1850 was elected justice of the peace, and served one term He was elected county auditor in 1856, and re-elected in 1858, 1860, and 1862. In January, 1866, he was appointed county treasurer for the unexpired term of the lamented O. R. Newcomb, deceased. He removed to Painesville in the fall of 1866, and again engaged in the mercantile business. In 1870 he was elected a member of the State board of equalization for the district, comprising Ashtabula, Lake, and Geauga counties. He now resides in East Claridon, Geauga county, Ohio. Mr. Field discharged his duties in all positions with ability and integrity. [page 351]
Thanks to Martha Magill for this contribution.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Horace M. Finley, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua in 1839, a son of Marshall, a native of Vermont, born in 1815. He came to Ontario county and was a teacher for a number of years, then established a daguerreotype gallery in Canandaigua, which he conducted until his age prevented him from active business, and it has since been conducted by his son, Horace M. The latter was educated in common schools and at Canandaigua Academy, and on leaving school went into his father's gallery to learn photography. In the early sixties he joined his father as a partner, and has ever since had an interest in the business. In 1888 he was joined in partnership by William N. Freeman, and their gallery is now located in the Finley block on Main street, where they are prepared to do first-class work either in photographs, crayons or out-door work. Mr. Finley married in 1866 Louisa H., daughter of Alfred B. Field, a former merchant of this town, and they have one child, Mrs. M. C. Beard, of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Fisher
, was born in Stockbridge, Mass., November 30, 1796, and came with his parents to Woodstock, Madison county, when he was two months old, and afterwards, in the year 1811, to Henrietta, Monroe county.  In the year of 1814 he located permanently at Fisher's, in the town of Victor.  He was among the earliest settlers here, and the place was named after him.  He was justice of the peace for a term of years, postmaster, and entertained travelers until there was a hotel started in the place.  He married twice, first July 29, 1821, Rebeckah Gaskell, of Victor.  They had two sons and three daughters:  Harriet; Charles, now of Newton, Kansas; Almira; Robert, an attorney of Victor village; and Mary R.  Mrs. Fisher died September 7, 1848, and he married second Helen J. Pardee, on October 21, 1850.  They had two sons, Henry P., born December 27, 1851, died June 25, 1893, who married Lucy E. Bushman, November 9, 1875, and had two children:  Clara and Charles.  William F. was born March 9, 1854; September 6, 1882, he married Addie C., daughter of Almon and Emily Preston, of Battle Creek, Mich.  They have two sons, Almon P. and Henry S.  Mr. Fisher was a produce dealer with his brother for some time, but is now farming on the old homestead.  He is a member of Milner Lodge, No. 139, F. & A. M., Victor, and Excelsior Chapter, No. 164, R. A. M., Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Harlan M. Fisher
, a native and resident of Bristol, was born February 25, 1850, and is a son of Alphonso G., a son of Nathaniel, whose father, Nathaniel, was a native of Dighton Mass., who about 1800 came to Bristol and settled.  Nathaniel, jr., was born in Dighton, Mass., and came to Bristol with his parents.  He was a colonel in the War of 1812, and was a prominent man.  He was held in great respect by the Indians, who often stopped on their hunting expeditions to stay over night with Ski-a-na-gha, as they called him, perhaps leaving some of their trophies of the chase as they departed in the morning.  His wife was Lovice Phillips of Dighton, Mass., who bore him one son and two daughters.  He died in Bristol in 1855, and his wife in 1863.  Alphonso was born in Bristol November 16, 1816, and married Almeda, daughter of John Worrallo, who was lost on Lake Erie.  Mr. Fisher and wife had two sons:  Harlan M. and Edgar N., the latter a farmer of Bristol.  Mr. Fisher was an active politician, yet never accepted office.  He died November 19, 1891, and his wife resides on the old homestead.  Subject was educated in Canandaigua Academy, graduating in 1878, and taught school for nineteen years in connection with farming.  He owns 165 acres of land and is a general farmer.  He makes a specialty of breeding bronze turkeys, Holstein cattle and Berkshire swine.  He is a member of the Ontario County Agricultural Society, and for four years has lectured at Farmers' Institutes in New York, under the auspices of the State Agricultural Society, on various subjects connected with agriculture, and is considered a drainage expert.  He is a Republican, and was assessor two terms.  In 1872, he married Helen L., daughter of the late Benjamin F. Phillips of Bristol.  They reside on the farm settled by Elnathan Gooding, grandfather of Mrs. Fisher and the first settler of Bristol, who came there at the age of seventeen and remained alone the first winter.  One incident is perhaps worthy of mention as illustrating the material of the sturdy yeomanry of New England who settled the Empire State.  While young Gooding was chopping down the thick forest to clear for crops, he heard a twig snap, and glancing over his shoulder saw a large savage standing back of him with a tomahawk raised to deal the deadly blow.  Without deigning to give the Indian further notice, he kept on chopping, never missing a single stroke.  The Indian, admiring his coolness in the trying circumstances, quietly slipped the tomahawk in his belt with an "Ugh, white man no scare", disappeared in the dense woods.  The children of Mr. and Mrs. Fisher are:  Ethel L., Ada E., Harlan A., Rex P., Almeda L., and Marion E.  Ethel L. is a student at Cook Academy at Havana NY.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry P. Fisher
, Victor, was born at Fisher's, Victor, December 27, 1851.  He was educated in the public schools, was a produce dealer for some time, and later a farmer.  November 9, 1875, he married Lucy E., daughter of Abner and Phoebe P. (King) Bushman of East Mendon, and they had two children:  Clara B. and Charles H.  Mrs. Fisher's father, Abner Bushman, was born in Monroe county November 28, 1801, was a school teacher, farmer, and also justice of the peace for twenty years.  He married twice, first to Jane Ely, and they had one daughter, Mrs. Bentley Corby, of Pittsford.  April 14, 1849, he married second Phoebe F. King of Brighton, Monroe county, and they had seven children, three died in infancy, four survive: Hanford E.; Lucy E.; Clara M.; and Julia who died at the age of eight years.  A branch of her family named Hopkins dates back to the Mayflower.  His grandfather on his mother's side, Silas Pardee from Columbia county, was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, and Mrs. Fisher's great-grandfather, Rufus King, was in the Revolutionary War.  Henry P. was a staunch Democrat.  He died June 25, 1893.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

J. G. Fitzwater was born at Bluff Point, Yates County, on October 2, 1853. For many years he conducted a boot and shoe repair store in this city, retiring in 1927. He re-entered active business for a short time and retired on March 13, 1927. Prior to coming to Geneva he conducted a shoe and clothing business in Penn Yan for 14 years. Mr. Fitzwater married Miss Lois A. Dean of Penn Yan and they now reside at 93 Main street. Mr. Fitzwater is an ardent fisherman and many fine catches of Seneca Lake fish have been recorded by him.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

George S. Flint was born in Canandaigua and lived in that city until 15 years of age when the family moved to Clifton Springs. After two years residence there, he went to Naples and at the age of 19 moved to Geneva where he has lived since. For the past 20 years Mr. Flint has had charge of the retail business of the Geneva Refrigerating Corporation, of which he is a director. In 1910 he was appointed coroner by Governor Charles E. Hughes to fill a vacancy and thereafter served two terms by election. Retiring from office he was, after six years, again elected coroner on the Republican ticket in 1924. He was elected county clerk in 1930 taking office January 1, 1931. He is a veteran of the Spanish-American War; a member of Geneva Lodge B. P. O. E., No. 1054; Geneva Lodge, F. and A. M. and the United Commercial Travellers. He resides at 4 Hoffman Avenue.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Charles J. Folger - Another eminent citizen and member of the Geneva Bar was Judge Charles J. Folger, who won a nation-wide reputation, becoming distinguished as a lawyer, jurist and statesman. He was born in Nantucket, Mass., April 16, 1818, and came with his parents to Geneva in 1830. Two years later he entered Hobart College, graduating in 1836. Soon after he entered the office of Sibley and Worden in Canandaigua and began the study of law, being admitted to the bar in 1839. As early as 1844 he was appointed county judge and served continuously until 1855. During the legislative sessions of 1862 and '63 and then continuously until 1869, Mr. Folger represented Ontario County in the State Senate and in 1867 he also was one of the delegates at large to the Constitutional Convention. On May 17, 1870, he was elected Judge of the Court of Appeals and ten years later, May 20, 1880, was elected chief judge of the same court. In 1881, on the 27th of October, Judge Folger was appointed by President Arthur as secretary of the treasury of the United States and in order to accept the appointment he resigned from the Court of Appeals on November 14th.

In 1882 he became a candidate of the Republican party for the office of Governor of New York but in the memorable campaign of that year which brought widespread disaster to the Republican party he was defeated. He then returned to his cabinet position, but only for a short time, inasmuch as he died Sept. 4th, 1884, at his home in Geneva.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Worth Folger, Geneva, son of Judge Charles J. Folger, was born October 9, 1847. He graduated from Williams College in 1868, then engaged with E. C. Selover in the nursery business. He was purchasing agent in the Bureau of Engraving at Washington, D. C., two years. In 1875 he married Susie Depew, daughter of George W. Depew, and they had five children. Mr. Folger died January 11, 1885.



From Ontario County Journal 31 December 1886; News from Reed's Corners;

John Fonda, was born in the town of Gorham, in 1852. He is the oldest of four boys. Nineteen years ago he commenced work with George Noble, to learn the trade of the blacksmith. He remained with him during a period of nearly, or quite seven years. His ambition to do something for himself prompted him to build a shop of his own, and he started out just then on his own responsibility. His earnest determination, and the quality of his work soon brought him custom. He soon enlarged his area for business, bought more ground and now has a thriving business. He does not confine his work to any special line, but accommodates all who come, in any desired class of work. His motto is "work and win."



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

George Frederick Fordon, a well-known farmer and fruit grower whose home was just west of Geneva, was born in the town of Seneca, January 11, 1850. He was educated in the country district schools and at Geneva High School. After graduation, for a time during the winter months, he taught in country District School No. 7. This was between 1869 and 1876, after which he purchased a farm in the conduct of which he was very successful. Mr. Fordon married, November 1, 1876, Caroline Elizabeth Tills, and their children were William Frederick born Oct. 8, 1877; Lucy Eliza born Oct. 17, 1879; Sarah Frances, born July 30, 1896. William Frederick continues to reside on the farm which was operated by his father. Mr. Fordon died June 17, 1922. (Note: Name of one daughter, Caroline Matilda, omitted. Birth dates also confused by omission.)



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The late William Forster, was born near Newcastle, Northumberland county, England, April 7, 1792; came to the United States in 1817, landing at Boston, Mass., worked in the country about two years, and came to Hall's Corners in 1819. He was in Clyde one year in the butcher business with a Mr. Parker. Returning to Hall's Corners he became a farmer with others, and subsequently for himself, purchasing the homestead northeast of the Corners. September 18, 1823, he married Mary Caward, of this town, formerly of Yorkshire, England; they had nine children: John 1st, who died in infancy; George, who died in his eighteenth year; Mary, Jane, William D., who married Martha Britt, of Catskill, and has two sons and a daughter; Edward H., John M. and Thomas W. are not married and occupy part of the home farm. John M. is a school teacher, having followed the profession ten years in several States; Ursilla E. died in her twentieth year, and Clark, who married Mary E. Ritchie. Their father died September 12, 1881, and their mother, February 13, 1888. One of their relatives, George Caward, was one of the largest barley dealers west of Albany.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Leander Forsyth
, East Bloomfield, a native of New London county CT, was born August 12, 1820, a son of Elisha, whose father, Lathan, was a native of Salem, Conn.  Lathan was twice married and the father of seventeen children.  He was a private in the Revolutionary War, and died about 1830.  Elisha, a native of Salem, Conn., was born in 1787, and was a farmer and a cooper.  He married Sallie, daughter of Joseph Chester of Salem, Conn., who was born March 17, 1731, and died in 1803. Mr. Forsyth came to East Bloomfield and there spent the remainder of his days, dying in 1857, and his wife in 1861.  They had three sons and two daughters.  Leander was reared on a farm and received a common school education.  At the age of seventeen he started in life for himself.  Coming to East Bloomfield he worked by the month for two years, and then went to Michigan where he learned the cooper's trade, which he followed forty years, but after six years he returned to East Bloomfield where he has since resided.  Of late years he has been engaged in farming, and for twenty years has been a successful grower of onions.  May 24, 1847, Mr. Forsyth married Lucy Quick, a native of Lyons, born January 6, 1819, and a daughter of Peter Quick.  Their children are:  Kate, who was educated in East Bloomfield Academy, and Frank, a carpenter of East Bloomfield.  He married a Miss Sage of Mendon, and they have one daughter, Lucy.  Mr. Forsyth is a Republican in politics, and has been highway commissioner twelve years in succession and excise commissioner three years.  He and family are Baptists.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Frank F. Foster
, Gorham, was born in Prattsburg, Steuben county, July 6, 1851, one of seven children of George and Ann (Stevenson) Foster of Yorkshire, England, who in 1850 came to America and now reside in Prattsburg.  In 1871 Mrs. Foster died, and he married Salina Horton.  Frank F. was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools and in Prattsburg Academy.  February 25, 1879, he married Flora L. Lord, a native of Gorham, born March 3, 1834.  She is a daughter of Ethan and Paulina Lord.  Mr. Foster follows farming, and makes a specialty of breeding draft horses.  He owns 130 acres, on which he has resided since 1880.  Here he has erected fine buildings.  Mr. Foster is a Republican.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John G. Foster, Canandaigua, was born in Victory, Cayuga county, August 22, 1836, a son of George W. of that town. The family on both sides were natives of Rhode Island. George W. was born in that State in 1793, and married in Rhode Island, Maria Estes, daughter of a sea captain. Soon after his marriage he came to this State and engaged in mercantile business in and about Auburn, later conducting a farm in Cayuga, where he died in 1882. He had ten children, four of whom are living. John G. spent his boyhood on the farm, and when sixteen years of age, he learned the trade of carriage making, in which he has always been engaged. He went to Buffalo when about eighteen and lived there until the breaking out of the war. December 16, 1863, he enlisted in the Eighth New York Heavy Artillery, and saw service in seven of the greatest battles of the war: Spottsylvania, North Ann River, Weldon Railroad, Wilderness, Gaines Farm, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, etc. At Petersburg, June 18, 1865, he was severely wounded and spent eleven months in the hospital. He was mustered out June 20, 1865, and returned to Batavia, from whence he went to LeRoy where he spent seven years. In 1872 he came to Canandaigua and worked as a journeyman for seven years, and then established a business for himself, and has since been a manufacturer of carriages, wagons, sleighs, and does general repairing. Mr. Foster married, May 20, 1857, Cordelia Ryan of Buffalo, and they have four children: Charles H., a commercial traveler; Bert M., one of the inventors and proprietors of the Foster Paint Company; Jennie L., wife of D. F. Thurston, a commercial traveler of Chicago; and John S. of Geneseo, a dealer in carriages.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Albert Fowle, retired Geneva baker, is one of the few living Genevans who clearly recall the sensation which the news of the death of Abraham Lincoln aroused here. He was a newsboy at the time and was one of the first in the city to receive the news. For 50 years he conducted a bakery at 77 Seneca street, retiring on March 27, 1926. He now resides at 71 Main street.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Reuben W. Fowler, Gorham, was born in Cuyahoga county, O., August 22, 1838, a son of Harvey, who was a son of Reuben W., a native of Connecticut, who married Sybil Sawyer and had seven children. About 1800 Mr. Fowler came to Gorham and settled on what is known as the Stark farm. He bought the land of the Indians, paying $1 worth of flour for an acre of land, carrying the flour on his back from Albany. He was worth at his death about $40,000. He died in 1854 at the age of seventy-five years, and his wife in 1875 at the age of ninety-four years. Harvey Fowler was born in 1811 on the homestead, and at the age of twenty-two married Fannie, daughter of James and Nancy Blair, of Pine Corners, and had six children, five of whom survive. He purchased a farm in Cuyahoga county, O., and there resided several years, when he returned to New York and purchased the Deacon Hatfield farm. In 1876 he went to live with is son-in-law, John Wilson, where he died May 9, 1892. His wife died September 15, 1883. Reuben W. attended the Rushville Academy. March 11, 1861, he married Caroline Sawyer, a native of Marshall, Mich., born July 22, 1842. She is a daughter of C. H. and Ruth A. (Comstock) Sawyer, who in 1851 moved to Hornellsville, and there died, November 12, 1853. His wife died March 11, 1876. Subject and wife had had two children: Charlotte A., wife of Frank C. Twitchell, a native of Middlesex, and a grape grower; and Harris C., who died December 20, 1866, at the age of fourteen months. Mr. Fowler has been a successful grape grower for twenty years. He is a Republican, but never cared for public office. He is a member of the Royal Templars at Middlesex.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Herman F. Fox, Geneva, was born in Savoy, Germany, May 13, 1843, and came to the United States with his parents at the age of five years. He was educated in the public schools and learned the cabinet trade. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth N. Y. Vols., and was in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, and Bristow Station. October 14, 1863, he was captured in the last named battle, taken to Libbie prison, and from there to Belle Isle, where he remained six months, rejoining his regiment May 17, 1864. He was in the battle of Tolopotomy and Cold Harbor. He was then detailed color bearer at brigade headquarters, serving in that capacity in the following engagements: In front and at the left of Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Reams Station, assault around Petersburg, Boydton Plank Road, and Sutherland Station. While charging the enemy's works, April 2, 1865, he was severely wounded the second time, losing his hand. Falling from his horse he still held the flag in his other hand, which the rebels tried to wrench from his loyal grasp. The brigade was successful in its second charge and Mr. Fox was carried into our lines, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. Upon his return to Geneva he learned telegraphy. In 1869 he began the manufacture of cigars, also opened a cigar store, which is continued until the present. In 1885 he was doorkeeper of the Assembly in the State Legislature. On March 30, 1889, he was appointed postmaster of Geneva by the Harrison administration, serving his full term. In 1872 he married Mary Winkler, formerly of Lyons, Wayne county, and they had three children: Carrie A., Charles H., and Frederick H. Mrs. Fox died March 6, 1877. His father, Ernest, was born at the old home in Savoy, Germany, in 1817, and married Amelia Gerber of his native place. They had twelve children, and came to the United States in 1848.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Joseph Fox, Geneva, was born in Troy, N. Y., in August, 1850. He was educated in the public schools, and learned the trade of stove mounting. March 27, 1883, he married Catherine O'Connor, of Troy, and they have six children, four sons and two daughters: Joseph T., William and Mary K. (twins), John, Winefred A. and George. Mr. Fox's father, Joseph F., was born in County Caven, Ireland, in 1801, and came to the United States when a young man. He married Bridget McMahon, formerly of his native place, and they had two children, Joseph and Mary. His father's brother was killed by Indians in the West. Mrs. Fox's father, Thomas O'Connor, was born in Roscommon, Ireland, and married Margaret Tanney, of his native place. They had nine children; five were born in Ireland.



From Biographical History  La Crosse, Monroe and Juneau Counties, Wisconsin: Lewis Publishing Co.; 1892; Pages 176 - 177.

W. D. Fox, hotel proprietor, La Crosse, Wisconsin.- A city had always among its distinguishing features one which person of all degrees thoroughly understand and appreciate, namely, a homelike and elegantly appointed hotel. La Crosse had many establishments of this kind, a noteworthy one being the Cameron House, conducted by W. D. Fox and D. P. Smith.  Mr. Fox was born in Ontario county, New York, December 6, 1826, and is a son of George and Huldah (Sheldon) Fox , natives of Connecticut and New York respectively. He received his education in the common schools, and at the age of twenty years went to Ohio, soon after removing to Wisconsin; there he was engaged in the milling business for ten years. Later he turned his attention to the hotel business, and has kept hostelries all along the line of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad; first he was at Portage, where he remained twenty-five years and had an enviable reputation. In March, 1880, he came  to La Crosse to take charge of the Cameron House. Here everything will be found necessary  the fitting up of a high-class hotel, and the cuisine bears deservedly a high and wide-spread reputation among the best classes of the traveling public. During the past decade Mr. Fox  had also been connected with the lumber interest here, and has found them quite remunerative.  He has associated with him in the hotel business D. P. Smith, possessing qualifications that especially fit him for the management of a hotel.

Submitted by: Arlene Goodwin



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John B. Francis
, was born in Wethersfield, Conn., January 29, 1813, of Huguenot ancestry.  He was educated in the common schools in Wethersfield, and at the age of sixteen went with Daniel Dewey, of Hartford, Conn., to learn the trade of cabinet worker.  He went to Bristol, Conn., in 1832, and worked for Seneca C. Hemenway and George Mitchell, the manufacturers of clock cases, where he was engaged for five years.  In 1837 he came to Waterloo, where he was with Hart Gillam & Co., in the furniture business, for about two years, and then spent about eighteen months conducting a furniture store, and in April, 1841, came to Canandaigua where he worked for Mr. Kellogg one year, and then established a store for himself.  About 1850 he added undertaking to his furniture business, and has ever since conducted it, making over forty years in the business in this town.  He is now retired from active life, and is living in Waterloo.  He is a Mason, and was until he moved from town the oldest Mason there; a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294, and Excelsior Chapter No 164.  He has also held a membership in the Monroe Commandry No. 12 K. T.  Mr. Francis married, April 22, 1838, Harriet Ives, of Bristol, Conn., daughter of Orrin Hart, of Canandaigua.  They have never had any children.  She died March 12, 1892, at seventy-three years of age.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Job Francisco, Canadice, was born in Canadice, November 21, 1831.  His father, Jacob, was born in Manlius, Onondaga County, about 1808, and died at the age of seventy-seven.  He came to this town when thirteen years old, and on arriving at Cayuga bridge, where the toll was located, a man invited him into his wagon, covering him with a blanket, thus passing the boy free.  He returned to Onondaga county, and came again permanently when nineteen years of age.  He was a blacksmith by trade, and worked at the business until disabled by infirmity.  He married Lovisa Goodfellow, a native of Onondaga county, who bore him eight children: John, who died in Portage in 1891, aged sixty-four years; Sophronia, Cordelia, Solomon, Job, Emeline, Francis Marion, who enlisted in the late war and died in the Florence prison pen; Harrison Eugene was in the army and died in 1891 in Parma, Monroe county; and Mary Persis, wife of Alonzo Holmes.  Later in life Jacob purchased a sixty-six acre farm, which he worked.  Job learned the blacksmith's trade.  He married Maria Trowbridge, of West Bloomfield, whose grandfather, Cruger, came from Massachusetts.  Of their four children, on son, Henry, died at the age of twenty-two.  The others are Stella, wife of Charles Caldwell, of Richmond; Nellie, wife of Harry Thomas, of Steuben county; and Ida, who is also at home.  Mr. Francisco has always lived in this town.  He has sixty-five acres on the homestead and forty-six acres on the Lake Road.  He has lived on his present place twenty-three years.  In politics he is a Republican, as are also his sons.  His great-grandfather emigrated to this country from France and settled in the East, and it is claimed that he lived to attain the great age of 133 years, as appears by a pamphlet published long ago.

Kindly donated by Robert Hiller; Robert would like contact with others interested in Francisco surname.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Dales F. Frankish, was born in Gorham, October 12, 1863. His father was Thomas, a native of England, born October 11, 1830, who came to America about 1843 and in 1863 purchased a farm of 110 acres. He now owns 283 acres. In 1856 he married Rebecca Pearson, a native of England, and a daughter of John Pearson of England, who came to America in 1844, To Mr. Frankish and wife were born six children, two of whom are living, George, a farmer of Gorham, and Dales F. Mr. Frankish is a Republican and a member of Reed's Corners Grange. Mrs. Frankish died December 16, 1892. Dales F. was educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy. December 18, 1889, he married Mary Smith, a native of Geneva, and daughter of Virgil and Fannie (Mitchell) Smith, he a native of Gorham and she of New Jersey. Subject and wife have one child, Maud.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Edward H. Frary
, Canandaigua, was born in Lyndon, Cattaraugus county, April 25, 1840.  As far back as 1640 the ancestors of this family have been natives of this country.  When Edward was but five years old his father died.  He was educated in the common schools and at Rushford Academy, and after leaving school learned the carpenter's trade.  In 1860 he came to Canandaigua, where he followed his trade until August 26, 1862, when he enlisted in Company A., Ninety-seventh Regiment NY Vols., known as the Conkling Rifles, and saw service with the Army of the Potomac from Antietam to the Wilderness.  He was wounded May 6, 1864, at the battle of the Wilderness by a ball passing through his left shoulder and lung.  He was carried from the field and left for dead, but good care brought him around, though he was never able to do duty again.  He was discharged February 15, 1865, on account of wounds, and returned to this place, where he has since lived.  In 1869 he was elected collector for this town, and 1870-71-72 held the office of constable.  In 1872 he went into Cooley's store, where he spent about eight years.  In 1880 he was appointed census enumerator, and in 1880-81 was village collector; 1882-83-84-85, school collector for District No. 11, and from 1888 to 1893 collector of District No. 1.  In 1887 he was elected on the Republican ticket justice of the peace, and re-elected in 1891.  He married in 1860 Emily A. Cross of Canandaigua (who died April 20, 1893), and they have three children:  Nellie A., wife of H. E. Osborn of Batavia; Edward W. of Canandaigua; and Minnie B.  Mr. Frary is Past Commander of Albert H. Murray Post G. A. R., No. 162.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William H. Frautz, Geneva, was born in Geneva, November 25, 1855. He was educated in the public schools and learned the trade of a mason. For some years he has been a contractor and builder, with his business enlarging continually. March 15, 1875, he married Amanda J. Tyler of Geneva, formerly of Lenox, Mass., and they have had six children. Charles died when three months old, five survive: N. Elizabeth, Nancy D., Mary A., William H. jr., and Catherine. Mr. Frautz's father, David, was born in Germany in the year of 1822, and came to the United States when a young man. He married Elizabeth Dove of Geneva, and they had three children: Charles, who resides in this village; William, who died when a month old; and William H. His father died in 1857, and his mother in 1869.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John P. Frazer
, Victor, was born in Newton, Sussex county NJ February 28, 1828, where he was educated in the district schools.  October 17, 1845, at the age of seventeen years he came to Canandaigua, and learned to be a tinsmith with his brother, B. P. Frazer.  In 1849 he came to Victor and worked as a journeyman at his trade with A. P. Dickinson and others.  In 1851 he began business on his own account, manufacturing and selling tinware, afterwards he added the hardware business, and has conducted it since.  November 28, 1849, he married Abby J. Kenfield of Naples, Ontario county, and they have one adopted son, Charles.  Mr. Frazer's father, John, was also born in New Jersey in 1788 and married Sarah Predmore of New Jersey, who was born November 21, 1786.  They had seven children:  Horatio N.; Benjamin P.; Mary A.; Joseph P.; William A.; Sarah E.; and John P.  His grandfather, John Frazer, was born in Iverness, Scotland, and came to the United States when he was sixteen years old; he was obliged to seek shelter here on account of playing Yankee Doodle on his bagpipe.  Mrs. Frazer's father, John Kenfield, was born in Massachusetts in 1800, and married Ruth Bump of his native State.  They had nine children, eight grew to maturity:  Mary A.; Salmon; Harriet; Lorenzo D; Abby J.; John; Wesley; and Lucina E.  They came to Naples in 1842.  Mr. Kenfield died February 1, 1881.  Mr. Frazer has been overseer of the poor of the town four years, also superintendent of the county poor six years, has been president of the village two years, member of the board of education six years, trustee of the M. E. Church for thirty years, and he and his wife are members of the same.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles E. Freer
, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua March 23, 1853, a son of Henry, a farmer of this town.  Henry Freer was born in Allegany county near the village of Nunda, about seventy-four years ago.  He was a boy when he came to Canandaigua and lived with the Grangers, for whom he was gardener and coachman many years.  He married when twenty-two years of age Ann Eliza Pease of Canandaigua by whom he had two children, but one now living, Mrs. Edna Randall of Bristol Springs.  Mrs. Freer died in 1850, and he married second Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Price, a native of England, who came to America in 1819, and to Canandaigua in 1838, who had been a resident of New Jersey and later of this county.  They had two children:  Hiram residing on the old homestead, and Charles E., our subject.  The whole life of the latter with the exception of three years, has been spent in this town.  He was educated in the common schools and Canandaigua Academy, and made his home on his father's farm until twenty-five.  He worked one year at Brigham Hall, and his father's farms on shares until 1880, when he bought eighty-nine acres in East Bloomfield which he sold in 1883, and bought his present place of 110 acres in one of the most beautiful locations on the lake shore, on which he has made many improvements, having set out fifteen acres for vineyard, 1,000 pear trees, 1,500 peach trees and 500 plums and considerable small fruit.  He has made his farm one of the largest fruit producers of its size in this town.  Has also erected new buildings and a commodious cottage on the shore.  He married in 1878 Jennie, daughter of James Worrell of Canandaigua, and they have two children:  Eleanor, who is in her fourteenth year, and Grace in her twelfth year.  James Worrell was a native of England and had been a resident of Canandaigua for fifty years.  He died December 30, 1892.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Hiram W. Freer, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, near Cheshire, August 20, 1860, the youngest son of Henry Freer. His present residence was bought by his father about twenty-five years ago, and is a fine farm of 100 acres on the west shore of Canandaigua Lake, considered one of the best in this section. Hiram was educated in the common schools, and his first business venture was in 1890, when he bought all that part of the homestead farm lying between the highway and Canandaigua Lake. Here he set out fifteen acres of vineyard, five acres of pears, plums and quinces, and an acre of peaches. He has also erected a commodious horse barn and a summer cottage on the lake shore. Mr. Freer is a Republican, but not a politician, his interests being centered in his farm. He married February 17, 1886, Emma, daughter of William H. Bennett, a native of Orleans county, by whom he had one child, Louis B., born September 14, 1887. Mrs. Freer is a member of the Wesleyan Methodist church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Seward French
, West Bloomfield, was born at East Bloomfield February 28, 1856.  He was preparing for Hamilton College when his father died, and he was called home to attend duties there.  He became a school teacher and later a deputy sheriff, in which office he was successful in apprehending thirty-one men out of thirty-three warrants had in one year.  In 1879 he began the study of law in the office of the noted criminal lawyer, Hon. George Raines of Rochester, with such close application that on an examination three and a half years later for admission to the bar, he was one of the foremost in his class of thirty.  He practiced in Rochester until 1889, then removed to Miller's Corners where he has one of the finest law offices in the county, and which has a museum of criminal relics and implements secured by his perseverance, as evidence in cases.  He has also two other offices at East Bloomfield and Victor, and branch offices in Chicago and Sioux Falls for divorces for parties wishing these facilities.  Mr. French devotes himself most especially to criminal law, and within five years was successful council in ninety-two criminal and that line of cases, one of the most important being the celebrated John Kelly homicide case, which was three years in the courts.  He tries a case with boldness and skill, and is a rapid thinker.  His father, Reuben E., was born in East Bloomfield, and married Maria H. McMichael, born in Canandaigua, of Scotch-Irish descent.  Reuben was three times supervisor and owned a fine farm near Miller's Corners, now owned by his son Seward, was born in Massachusetts and came to Victor among the early settlers.  Subject is a 32d degree Mason, is notary public for Ontario, Livingston and Monroe counties.  He married in 1876 Jennie L. Jefferson, daughter of John Jefferson of Miller's Corners, and they have three children living:  Reuben, Lyra and Florine.  One daughter, Floice, is deceased.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George W. Freshour, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, N. Y., June 6, 1823, on the farm he now owns, a son of John, whose father was a native of Germany and came to America previous to the French and Indian war, in which he took part. He also participated in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Freshour had three sons and three daughters, and settled in Frederick, Md., 1789. He had a common school education in both English and German, and in 1810 married Mary Angleberger, of Frederick county, Md. He settled in Hopewell and purchased 150 acres of the Phelps and Gorham purchase, and added to it until he owned about 500 acres. They had four sons and two daughters, two of whom are living, George W., and Alexander, a resident of Gorham. Mr. Freshour was a Whig, and a commissioner of highways. He died in 1859 and his wife in 1869. Subject was educated in common schools and in Canandaigua Academy, and in 1849 married Leonora, daughter of Abraham I. Failing, of Montgomery county, whose father was Captain Failing. To subject and wife was born one son Byron, who married Alice Warner, an adopted daughter of Milton Warner, of Hopewell. Mr. Freshour is a Democrat, and has been justice of peace twelve years, overseer of the poor six years, justice of sessions two terms, and in 1891 he was nominated for assemblyman. He is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 292 and of Hopewell Centre Grange No. 454.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John C. Freshour
, Gorham, was born March 25, 1840, a son of Edward A. (son of John), who was born in Hopewell
October 10, 1816.  December 30, 1838, he married Lany M. Brizee, a native of Woodstock, Ulster county, born
September 7, 1818, daughter of Cornelius and Sarah (Van Benschoten) Brizee. Her father was born in Columbia county November 14, 1792, and her mother in Woodstock October 31, 1795.  Mr. and Mrs. Brizee had four sons and three daughters.  He died October 27, 1878  , and his wife November 12, 1878.  Edward A. Freshour and wife had two sons and a daughter, of whom John C. is the only one living.  In 1854 Edward A. Freshour came to Gorham and bought a farm, but now lives retired.  J. C. Freshour was educated in East Bloomfield Academy and Genesee Wesleyan Seminary.  In 1882 he went to Boston where he engaged for a time in real estate.  He has also spent some time as a florist, but is now engaged in farming and dealing in live stock.  In 1863 he married Genie M., daughter of Olney and Jane Rice, early settlers of Gorham, where Olney Rice Sr. owned a carding mill.  Mr. and Mrs. Freshour have one daughter, Rosabelle, wife of W. L. Lines, of New Haven Conn.  For some years Mrs. Lines received private lessons in Boston, in the languages and instrumental music, the latter under William H. Sherwood.  She is now a noted pianist.  She spent one year with the Emerson Pierce Grand Concert Company and has played in all the leading halls of Boston.  She has been highly complimented by the Boston press.  Mr. Freshour is a member of Stanley Lodge No. 434 I. O. O. F. and of Seneca Grange, and is a Democrat in politics.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Dr. William Frisbie, Phelps, was born in Saratoga county May 22, 1769.  He attended lectures at the Medical College of Albany where he graduated.  He was the first physician of that name that came to the village of Vienna, Ontario county.  It was afterwards called Phelps, and is now known by that name.  In the year 1819 he moved with his wife (Elizabeth Davidson of Peterboro NH) and their six children from Pittsford, Rutland county, VT, to Phelps.  He resumed his practice of medicine; he was eminent in his profession, a man of great moral worth, and exerted a strong and healthful religious influence in the town; he continued steadfast in the maintenance of sound principles, beloved and honored until his death, which occurred at Phelps in 1857.  His oldest son, Dr. E. Willard Frisbie, was born at Pittsford VT on May 12, 1799.  He came to Phelps when he was twenty years old, having graduated at Castleton VT, about the time the family removed to Phelps.  He went into practice with his father, who had a large and extensive business; they owned an acre of land, which was a beautiful garden, in the center of the east village, just across from the old Edmonston tavern.  When the boom struck the town in 1837, he sold it and purchased the Redfield property, just half a mile west of the village, on the street leading to Clifton Springs.  Here in this ample and beautiful Christian home, the poor and outcast classes and color found a shelter; it was renowned for being one of the Underground Railroad stations.  Here the drunkard or homeless found firm friends in the doctor and his wife (who was Miss Sophronia Boynton, the second daughter of Hon. Jonathan Boynton of Walworth, Wayne county.  They had six children:  Ann Elizabeth, Frances Maria, William, Irene Caroline (who died at Phelps 1857), Garret S. and Mary Boynton.  Garret S. Frisbie is the only one of the family who is living now at Phelps.  He married Jane Hubbell , the only child of Geo. Hubbell of Phelps.  They have four children:  Gertrude, Julia Etta, Georgia, and Charles.

Died at his residence in Phelps, Ontario county, near Clifton Springs, on Tuesday, July 31, 1860, Dr. E. Willard Frisbie.

Doctor Frisbie had for many years been extensively known.  He was eminently a religious man and devoted much of his time, talents and substance to the cause of benevolence.  He was among the first to embrace the doctrines and practice of temperance, and is love of liberty was no silent, calculating sentimentalism, but a living, fearless, outspoken principle, and regarding all men as made by the great Author of all being one blood, and entitled to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness, he claimed equal freedom for all.  His education with his strong and well disciplined mind enabled him to make his influence felt.  In the early periods of these reforms he experienced the truth of the declaration that "they that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution", and it was none the less trying to have a full share of this persecution come from the church.  His name has often been before the public as a nominee of the Liberty Party for high and responsible offices, and more than once as member of congress.  At times his oppressors manifested great bitterness and hatred at the reforms he advocated, yet such was his dignity and his justice that could but respect the man.  His course has been onward, never turning to the right nor left for popular favor.  An incident is remembered which was so characteristic that we give it a record.  The the first celebration of the West India Emancipation at Geneva, about the year 1840, a large number had gathered under the call and direction of a very respectable committee of colored people.  A procession was formed with a band of music and with appropriate banners.  But it was soon discovered that the procession was made up of wholly colored people except Doctor Frisbie, and the writer (the writer here referred to was his beloved friend, Hon. Henry Bradley, of Penn Yan), who, without thought or concert, had dropped into the line side by side, attracting the gaze and it was understood the sneers of the fastidious and the refined, who thought they were opposed to amalgamation.  On Monday night, Doctor Frisbie went into his door yard to nurse a sick young horse.  The horse in its struggles kicked the doctor, striking him in the abdomen.  He returned to his house and told his family that he was fatally wounded.  Viewing death as near at hand and certain, it might be expected that he would repent of his past ultraisms and adopt the popular conservatism to die by.  Not so, he met death in twenty hours without shrinking, and died as he lived, a Christian.



From Victor Herald Newspaper 6 July 1895

Memorial Held at St. Paul's Universalist Church, Victor, N. Y. - James Frost was born Sept. 14, 1794, at Madison, Madison county, N. Y. He was married to Lena DeMott Jan. 12, 1814. They lived at Farmington and at Batavia before they came to Victor. They had five children, three sons and two daughters, only one of whom is living. As a man and citizen, he was honest and upright in all his dealings. He was a strictly temperate man. We know at one time he was a Baptist, because among old papers was found part of a letter from the "First Baptist church of Christ of Batavia recommending James and Lena Frost to any other church of our faith."



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