"Com" to "Cz" Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

James L. Cone, Hopewell. The Cone family has been represented in America for seven generations. Daniel Cone, the founder of the family, came to this country about 1650, and died in 1676. Next came Caleb 3d, Caleb 4th, Ozias 5th, Ozias 6th, Warren and 7th James L. Ozias, grandfather of the subject, was born in Connecticut, May 2, 1774, and when a young man came to Hopewell, and there married Mercy, daughter of Daniel Warren, one of the first settlers of Hopewell. Mr. Cone died here in 1805. Warren Cone was born in Hopewell, October 2, 1800. He married Sally A., daughter of John Case, and they had four children: James L., Mary A., Caroline and Lydia. Mary A. married E. S. Snow; Caroline married George Jones, and Lydia married Charles W. Beach. The wife of Warren Cone died in 1835, and Mr. Cone married Pamelia Hawes, by whom he had four children. His sons, William H. and George W., are both locomotive engineers. His daughter, Julia, married Samuel Friedlander. Mercy married a Mr. Rodgers, and resides in Minnesota. Mr. Cone was in early life a farmer, but later became engineer. He spent many years on Lake Erie. His death occurred at Toronto, Canada, in 1863. James L. was born in Hopewell, December 15, 1822. When he was thirteen years old his mother died, and he began working on a farm. He received a common school education, and in 1845 he married Edna A. Beach, a native of Hopewell, born on the old Beach homestead, May 16, 1822. Her parents were David W. and Eliza (Murray) Beach, the former a native of Massachusetts, and the latter of Canandaigua. Mr. Beach came to Hopewell in 1819 and there lived until his death, April 6, 1889. He had three daughters: Lucy A., who married Hiram Depue; Laviah, who married James W. Case; and Edna C. Mr. Cone and wife have had five children: Winfield S., Electa B. (married and lives in Clinton, Ia.), Alice B. (deceased), and James S. (deceased. David W. resides with his parents. He has been twice married, first to Kate A. Arnold, and second to Sarah Huntsman, by whom he has one child, William M. Mr. Cone is a Democrat, and has been justice of the peace for four terms, assessor for three years, and highway commissioner one term. He attends the M. E. church at Hopewell Centre. Wife of subject died December 6, 1890.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Winfield S. Cone, Hopewell, was born December 12, 1846, in Hopewell, on the farm he now owns, a son of James L. and Edna C. (Beach) Cone. He was educated in common schools and Canandaigua Academy, and has followed farming. He inherited 100 acres of land from his grandfather, to which he has added sixty acres. January 5, 1870, he married Josephine H. Mitchell, a native of New Jersey, born July 26, 1851. She is a daughter of Henry C. Mitchell of Gorham. To subject and wife were born two daughters, Maud B., born June 1, 1871, and educated in Canandaigua Union School, Hattie B. born May 2, 1874, attends school in Canandaigua. Mr. Cone is a Democrat and was town clerk eleven years in succession. The family attends the M. E. church at Hopewell Centre, of which Mrs. Cone and daughter, Maud B., are members.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Connelly, the late John H., Victor, was born in County Kerry, Ireland, June 25, 1842, and came with his aunt to the United States to his parents who had preceded him here.  This event took place when he was nine years old; he was a produce dealer and commission merchant.  March 10, 1869, he married Sarah J. Murphy, of Fishers, and they had three children:  Ida M., Adeline B., who married George P. Fowler, of Fishers,; and Frederick J.  The oldest daughter and the son reside at home with their mother.  Mr. Connelly died November 30, 1887, from injuries received on the New York Central & Hudson River Railway.  Mrs. Connelly carries on the old business in a thriving intelligent manner.  She is also the postmistress at Fishers.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Robert E. Connolly
, Phelps, was born in Phelps, April 1, 1860, one of four children living of Andrew and Julia Connolly of this place.  He engaged in the dry goods and grocery business in 1880 in company with E. J. Ryan.  In 1888 Mr. Ryan withdrew from the firm, and since that time Mr. Connolly has continued the business alone.  In that year he added a clothing department.  He employs two men to assist him in the business which is in a flourishing condition.  He married June 8, 1886, Mary A. Sommers of Hopewell, daughter of Daniel and Mary Sommers.  They have two children, John E. and Marie.  Mr. Connolly was appointed postmaster at Phelps June 13, 1893.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John Conover, Victor, was born in Victor, April 20, 1817, was educated in the district schools and has always been a farmer. January 9, 1858, he married Elizabeth, daughter of William and Ruth Tucker, of Penn Yan, but when married of Akron, O. They have had four children: Theodore, who married Clara Mink of Rochester, and has two children, John and Irma; Anneth, who died at the age of nine years; Mabel and Libbie M., both reside at home with their parents. Mr. Conover's father came from the town of Mohawk, Montgomery county. He married Margaret Bowers and had nine children; two were born there, the others in Monroe and Ontario counties: Vincent, Catherine, Benjamin, Betsey, William, Mary J. and Angeline (twins), John and Hannah. Mr. Conover died about the year 1838. Mrs. Conover's father, William Tucker, was born in Plaistow, N. H., and married Ruth Cameron of the town of Perrinton, Monroe county. They had four children: Elizabeth, Elisha, George and Junietta. The family moved to Yates county, and afterwards to Ohio. In the year of 1860 Mr. Conover planted an orchard of apple trees, several acres in extent, which at this writing is much admired, and is profitable to its owner.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Conroy, James J., Canandaigua, was born in Ireland  in July, 1848, and came to this country in 1867. He first located in New York city, and in 1875 came to Canandaigua, where he engaged as cutter for D. Shafer & Co., of this town, remaining until 1880, when he established a business for himself on Niagara street.  In 1890 he was joined in partnership by Joseph B. O'Brien, who was with him about a year.  At that time he moved into his present fine store in the new Flannigan block, where he carries a fine stock of clothes for his merchant tailoring department, and a fine stock of men's furnishing goods. The merchant tailoring department in the rear of the store employs from four to six hands.  He married in 1882 Mary E. Harrigan, of East Bloomfield.  Mr. Conroy and wife are members of the Catholic church.  Of the merchant tailors of this town none is more prominent or bears a reputation for better work than Mr. Conroy.  He was for a year and a half in Pennsylvania and Kentucky.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Edward John Cook, one of Geneva's leading lawyers, was born in Warren, Ohio, June 20, 1873. He was educated at Oberlin Academy and Oberlin College and entered Hobart College to graduate with the class of 1898 with the degree of LL.B. He was admitted to the bar during the summer of 1898 and began the practice of law in Geneva at 50 Seneca Street, where he has since been located. For the past twenty years he has acted as president of the Board of Trustees of the North Presbyterian church and for fifteen years he has been secretary and member of the Board of Trustees of Hobart College. He is a Mason, a charter member of the local lodge of Elks, and a charter member and past president of the Rotary Club. He is a director of the Geneva Trust Company and the Geneva Savings Bank, also of a number of local business corporations. He is a member of the local, the county and the state bar associations and is vice president of the Western New York Bar Association. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Geneva General Hospital and of the Board of Trustees of the Geneva Free Library. In 1905 he married Miss May Martin Smith and they reside at 616 South Main street.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

A. Eugene Cooley, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, October 21, 1844, a son of Albert B. Cooley, a native of this town, and a son of Lyman, born in this town in 1792 of old New England stock. He had seven sons. Albert Cooley was born in 1814, and married Achsah Griswold, by whom he had eight children, all now living. A. Eugene is the oldest son, and was educated in Canandaigua Academy. In 1862 he enlisted in the Fourth N. Y. Heavy Artillery, serving all through the war. He was wounded in 1864 at Spottsylvania, was in the hospital nine months, and was then transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps in which he served at Point Lookout, Md., until the close of the war, mustered out June 29, 1865. He returned here, finished his education, and then came into the store, becoming a partner in 1883. He was a director of the Canandaigua Street Railway, sanitary inspector for the Board of Health, and while serving in this capacity was efficient in making a change in the management of affairs that was very beneficial to the tax payers. Mr. Cooley married in 1875 Mary, daughter of William K. Foster, former shoe merchant of this town. Mr. Cooley is a member of Albert M. Murray Post G. A. R. No. 162, and has been adjutant for two years. He has been deacon of the Congregational church for four years, and was secretary of the Ontario District Y. P. S. C. E. for the two years past.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Augustine S. Cooley, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, July 14, 1856, a son of James S. The latter was a native of this county and came here in 1851, and, in partnership with his brother, Nathaniel, began the manufacture of agricultural implements, and established a hardware business. He had two children: Hattie M. and Augustine S., who was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and after leaving school entered the store of his father, where he has always been engaged. About 1868 Nathaniel sold his interest to his brother, and the firm was J. S. Cooley until 1879, when it was changed to J. S. Cooley & Son; and in 1883, A. Eugene Cooley being added to the firm, it was changed to J. S. Cooley Son & Co., and on the death of the senior member, December 20, 1889, the firm was made A. S. & A. E. Cooley, which it has continued. They carry a complete line of general hardware, together with an extensive tin and furnace shop. Mr. Cooley married in 1883 Harriet C., daughter of Allen Reed, of Canandaigua, and they have two children: Lura Esther, and James Allen. At the time of the organization of the Canandaigua Street Railway Company in 1888, Mr. Cooley, in company with Mr. C. F. Milliken, were the first to agitate the subject and to organize the company. He has held the position of treasurer and president of the company, and he was a director from the time of its formation. He was two years secretary of the Ontario County Agricultural Society, 1882-1883. He also owns a fruit farm and is largely interested in the culture of grapes and small fruits. For the last three years his attention has been given to large investments in the Indiana natural gas fields, and is a director in the Western Improvement Company, doing business at West Muncie, Ind. Mr. Cooley has been executor of several estates, and is now acting as trustee and treasurer for other trusts.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George B. Cooley, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, September 4, 1863, a son of Edgar M. Cooley, who was born here in 1826, a son of Lyman Cooley, who came to this country from Massachusetts early in the century. Lyman Cooley had seven sons, of whom Edgar was next to the youngest. Edgar M. Cooley at his death was a commission merchant in Canandaigua. George B. was the only child, and was but seven years old when his father died. He was educated at Walworth Academy under Prof. Norris. After leaving school he taught a short time, and in 1883 entered the office of H. M. Field as clerk and law student, remaining with him until 1887, when he went into the office of Box, Norton & Bushnell at Buffalo, as managing clerk, returning here the following year to continue his studies with H. M. Field. In September, 1889, in company with Albert B. Sackett, established the reporting, typewriting and copying office in the Atwater block, which they still conduct. In March, 1892, Mr. Cooley was nominated on the Republican ticket for town clerk, and elected without opposition, re-elected in 1893, admitted to the bar in March 1893.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Cooley, H. Seymour, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, December 25, 1862, a son of Albert B., a farmer of this town, who was the first to introduce the Hampshiredown sheep in this country, which were imported from England.  The whole life of our subject has been spent in this town.  He was educated in the Canandaigua Academy, and on leaving school in November, 1879, entered the store of his uncle, James S. Cooley, where he has ever since remained.  In 1892 Mr. Cooley was elected trustee of the village.  He is a member of the Mutual Hook and Ladder Company, and of Canandaigua Lodge No. 245, Knights of Pythias, of which he was one of the organizers and a charter member.  Mr. Colley married in 1883 Carrie A., daughter of W. S. Townsend, of Canandaigua.  He is a supporter and Mrs. Cooley is a member of the Methodist church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Orion J. Cooley, Canandaigua, was born at his present residence November 18, 1856, a son of John B. and Catherine T. (Benson) Cooley. His grandfather, John, a native of Massachusetts, was one of the first of the family to come here to this country. He had seven children, two sons and five daughters. John B., father of our subject, was the youngest son. He was born February 12, 1814, and always made his home in this town. He was educated at Lima Seminary, and when twenty-two years of age bought a farm of 200 acres on Lot 70 in Canandaigua, where he spent the balance of his life. In politics he was a Democrat. He was twice elected commissioner of highways, and was an influential member of the Methodist church. He died August 23, 1880. He was twice married; his first wife, Adelaide Cooley, was from Attica, and they had seven children, all but one now living:  Francis M. and Lucian A., of Michigan; Martha A. and Mary A. of Canandaigua; Frederick S. of Bloomfield; and Lucina J. Morse, of Canandaigua. Mrs. Cooley died about 1851, and he married second a daughter of Joshua Benson, of Cayuga county, and they had four children; three survive: Eleanor D., wife of William Crowley, of Canandaigua; Catherine E., wife of George W. Robinson, of Ogdensburg; and Orion J., our subject., who has always lived on this, the homestead farm. He was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and became a farmer. Mr. Cooley and family are members of the Methodist church, and he is a staunch Democrat, also a member of East Bloomfield Grange. He married December 21, 1876, Ella M., daughter of Levi Gifford, of Canandaigua, and they are the parents of one child, John, now in his tenth year.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Coolidge
, Phelps, one of two children living of Abio and Elizabeth (Eastman) Coolidge (the mother being Mary), was born in Litchfield, Herkimer county, January 31, 1847.  The father, Abio Coolidge, was also born in Herkimer county, removing to Phelps in May, 1866, where he is still living at the age of eighty-three years.  The mother, Elizabeth Eastman, was born in Connecticut.  Her father, Benjamin, was one of the "Boston tea party" as was Warren Coolidge, the grandfather.  The Coolidge family were established in the Massachusetts colony, at an early day.  Mr. Coolidge's farm of forty acres is used for fruit and vegetables, where he also raises seed for seedsmen.  For many years he has been interested in improving fruits, vegetables and poultry, of which latter he has some very fine specimens.  He has also been interested in Grange matters, and was influential in the formation of the Grange in Phelps.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

J. P. Coons, Naples, was born in Penn Yan, Yates county, May 1, 1837, son of Philip Coons, and moved to Naples in 1840. the subject was educated at Naples district school.  At the age of twenty-one he commenced learning the carpenter and building trade.  He worked first with R. T. Porter of Naples, and the second year entered into partnership with him, continuing only one year when he branched out for himself and has been engaged at the business in the village since.  He has never taken much interest in politics.  In 1891 he was elected excise commissioner.  Mr. Coons has been married three times, first to Frances Vincent of Watkins, Schuyler county, and they have one daughter:  Cora F.  His second wife was Antoinette Maxfield, daughter of Elias Maxfield of Naples.  His present wife was Mary J. Bowls, daughter of James Bowls of Naples.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

E. Darwin Copp, Clifton Springs, was born in New Hampshire, January 30, 1834. He received an academic education, and after farming and teaching school for several years, enlisted in 1862, August 7, in the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth N. Y. Vols. He was shortly afterward detailed to do clerical work in the office at Camp Convalescent, Va., and during the last six months of his service was chief clerk of the Soldiers' Rest, Alexandria, Va. After receiving his discharge at close of the war, he immediately returned to Clifton Springs and established a boot and shoe store, to which he shortly added groceries and glassware. His health failing he sold out, and after a time established a coal, lumber, grain and produce business, also became connected with the Clifton Springs Manufacturing Company. He has held the office of president, secretary and treasurer. This concern manufactures anti-rusting tinware and tin specialties, employing seventy-five hands. Mr. Copp married Mary E. Spalsbury, daughter of Dr. Spalsbury. They have no family. Mr. Copp is a member of the G. A. R., and steward and treasurer of the M. E. Church.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Frank A. Corwin was born in Phelps and has been a life-long resident of Ontario County. He was elected sheriff of the county in 1927 and took office on January 1, 1928. Previous to becoming sheriff, he was undersheriff in Sheriff Bolles' administration for three years. For ten years preceding his taking office he was a member of the undertaking firm of Currey & Corwin of this city and following the expiration of his term of office returned to active partnership in the firm. Mr. and Mrs. Corwin have three children, a daughter and two sons. Mr. Corwin's father, Irving Corwin, was Ontario County sheriff about 40 years ago. He now lives in Sodus.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

David Cosad
, Phelps, whose ancestors are traced back to the Huguenots of France, was born in Junius, Seneca county, February 13, 1832.  His father was also named David Cosad, and was born in New Jersey.  He died in 1886 at the age of eighty-three years.  His wife was Martha (Yury) Cosad.  The grandfather was Samuel Cosad of New Jersey, who came to New York in early life, where he died at the age of ninety-nine years, his sister dying at ninety-eight.  David Cosad married first in 1863 Sarah Clark of Sodus.  She died in 1874 leaving one son, Willis G.  The latter was educated at the University of Yale where he graduated in 1888.  Willis G. Cosad studied law in the office of Judge Halsey of Norwich CT, and is now with the firm of Cadwallader, Strong & Co. 36 Wall street, New York.  Mr. D. Cosad was again married in 1876 to Hattie, daughter of William Young of Lyons.  He came to Phelps in 1865 and bought the farm of 125 acres on which he now lives.  He makes a specialty of hop and fruit culture, having an orchard of seven acres with twenty-five acres of vineyard; his new packing-house being notable in this region for the completeness of its appointments.  He is one of the representative public-spirited citizens of the town.  He has served as supervisor of the town, has also been elected and served as member of assembly for this district.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Thomas H. Cost, Canandaigua, was born in Manchester, Ontario county, November 21, 1831. Jacob, the grandfather, was a native of Maryland, born in Frederick county May 17, 1773, and married May 20, 1802, Mary Con. They came to Ontario county and settled in Manchester, where they had six children: Elizabeth, Mary, Lucretia, wife of Richard Sheckel of Hopewell; Henry, a resident of Rochester; and John, a retired farmer of Clifton Springs. Jacob died September 30, 1843. Jesse, the oldest son, father of our subject, was born in Manchester, November 23, 1805. He was a Whig until the division of the Whig party, then became a Democrat. In 1854 he was elected assemblyman to represent the eastern district, and served as a member of several important committees. In 1869 he moved to Canandaigua, where he died February 27, 1888. He married April 2, 1829, Cynthia Orme Baggerly of Manchester, and they had two children: Addie Cordelia, wife of William Cassort, a farmer of Canandaigua, and Thomas H. The early life of the latter was spent in Hopewell. He was educated in Canandaigua Academy and at Lima Seminary, and followed farming in Hopewell until 1865, when he spent a year in Clifton Springs, two years traveling, and settled on his present farm in 1868. This is a farm of 190 acres on lot 104, where Mr. Cost has erected a beautiful residence and made many improvements. He is a Democrat, and in 1881 was elected supervisor. He has also been assessor three years. He was for many years a director of the Ontario County National Bank, until they closed business, and has for fourteen years been a trustee of the Presbyterian church. He married, February 18, 1858, Mary J., daughter of Gerrit Debow, of Farmington. They have an adopted daughter, Ida H., who is now attending school.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Cotton, Edward J., Farmington, is a son of Jeremiah B., who was born August 17, 1814, in Farmington.  He was educated in the common schools of his day and was a farmer until he retired.  His son, Edward J., now has charge of the farm.  February 19, 1845, he married Sally M. Cheseboro, of this town.  They had ten children of whom seven survive:  Mary J., William, Edward J. and Edwin B. (twins), Eliza A. and Louisa (twins), and Charles T.  Almira, Jeremiah and a son who died in infancy.  Mr. Cotton's father, Isaac, was born in New Jersey about the year of 1785, and married Charity B. Bennett, of his native State, and came to this State about the year 1811.  They had seven children:  Nathaniel, Susan, Jeremiah B., Ann, Matilda, Isaac, Leonard.  Edward J. was born on the old homestead January 8, 1845.  He was educated in the common schools and Macedon Academy.  January 17, 1863, he enlisted in Company M, Sixteenth Heavy Artillery N.Y.S. Vols. and was honorably discharged at the close of the war.  Jeremiah B. Cotton will be seventy-nine years old if he lives until August 5 17, 1893.  His wife died March 12, 1881.  His grandfather, Jeremiah Bennett, on the maternal side, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  Edward J. cotton's great-grandfather on the paternal side came from England.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


William N. Cottrell,
West Bloomfield, was born in 1832. His father, George, came to this town from Rhode Island about 1817, and married Betsey Shepard, also of West Bloomfield. Of their four children, only George Henry, born in 1829, and William N., are living. George H. married Mary A. Plympton, whose father, Moses, was born in Medway, Mass., in 1786, and came here with his wife and ten children in 1812, and was fife-major in the war of that time. William N. was educated at Lima Seminary and has followed farming. He was born where his brother now resides, and married in 1861 Ruth N. Millington, who died nine years later, leaving two children, Nellie S. and George D. Mr. Cottrell married again in 1872 Maria E. Chapin, daughter of Rev. Asa Chapin. He is a Republican.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Couch, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, January 10, 1834, a son of George Couch who was born in Connecticut, February 24, 1793, a native of Connecticut, who came in 1815 to Hopewell, where he died. He went to Ovid, Seneca county, when a young man. He owned a boat on Cayuga Lake at one time, transporting goods to various towns along the lake and Mohawk River. In the War of 1812 he was a volunteer, afterwards serving as a substitute in the artillery. At the close of the war he took a boat load of salt on the Oswego River and Great Lakes to Grand River, Mich., transporting in wagons around Niagara Falls. The Indians took his cargo up the Grand River, where he disposed of it and returned to Ovid. Returning to Michigan the next summer, he was taken ill and was cured by a squaw, who told him if he would accompany her to Pennsylvania, she would show him a silver mine there. This he refused to do, but afterwards found that such a mine did really exist. Mr. Couch married Mahala Nichols, of Ballston, Dutchess county, by whom he had these children: Lucinda, born August 15, 1818; Stephen, born October 19, 1819; Amanda, born November 1, 1821; George, born December 21, 1823; Eliza, born October 23, 1829; Maria, born March 6, 1831, died October 18, 1888; and Charles, born June 10, 1834. In 1819 Mr. Couch came to Hopewell. He was a carpenter by trade, following same most of his life. He gave the land on which the church at Emery Chapel was built. He died July 23, 1880, and his wife April 27, 1873. Charles Couch married, March 4, 1867, Harriet Woods, born at Flint Creek, Seneca county, by whom he had two daughters, Lulu M., born December 18, 1868, died March 24, 1886, and Carrie E., born May 15, 1870. His wife died April 20, 1877, and he married second Annie (Case) Shoemaker, daughter of Nelson S. and Sarah (Chapin) Case, of Canandaigua. Mrs. Couch has one son, Ray C., by her first husband. Mr. Couch is a Democrat.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Coursey, Patrick, Geneva, was born in Ireland, about twenty miles from Dublin, in 1815. In 1847 he emigrated to this country and settled at Geneva, where he engaged in the produce business and afterward in the grocery business. In 1864 he built a large tannery on Exchange street and carried on that business until his death, February 24, 1879. He married Mary Laughran, and they had six children, of whom but two are living:  Thomas and Stephen. The latter was born  September 28, 1846, and attended the village school.  He graduated from the Walnut Hill School, then engaged in business with his father. He built the Geneva Flouring Mills in 1877 and has operated them ever since.  He deals largely in wool, buying as high as 200,000 lbs. per year.  He has been village and town assessor, is a Democrat, and takes an active part in political affairs. He is owner of the celebrated Geneva Spring.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. Jay Byington Covert, one of the leading physicians of Geneva, is the son of Dr. Nelson B. Covert. He was born in this city June 18,1875, and after graduating from Geneva High School entered Hobart College, graduating in 1898. His Degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred in 1902 from Columbia University. After spending two years as resident physician in the Smith Infirmary, Staten Island, he returned to Geneva and commenced practice in association with his father. For many years since his father's death he has continued to practice alone.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Nelson B. Covert, M. D., Geneva, was born in the town of Ovid, Seneca county, January 22, 1840. He received his early education at the Seneca Collegiate Institute preparatory to the study of medicine. He graduated from the Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College in the spring of 1862. He first began practice in Fentonville, Mich., and in September, 1864, came to Geneva where he entered into partnership with Dr. H. L. Eddy, which continued for two years. Since that period he has continued business for himself at his present location. He is a member of the Ontario County Homeopathic Medical Society, the State Homeopathic Medical Society, which at an annual meeting in Albany in February, 1891, conferred an honorary degree upon him called the "Regent's Degree" He is also a member of the National Society, The American Institute of Homeopathy and Ophthalmological and Otological Society. He has held the office of coroner for two terms, and health officer of the village for several years and was instrumental in having the sewerage commission appointed whose duty it is to provide survey plans and maps for a complete system of sewerage for the village of Geneva. He is also president of the People's Building and Loan Association of the village, one of the largest doing business in this State. He with his family attends the Baptist Church and have been closely identified with every advance the church has made during the past twenty-five years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles A. Coykendall, Canadice, was born in Yates county, October 16, 1830. When he was two years of age his father, Jotham, moved with his family to this town. His grandfather, Emanuel came from New Jersey to Yates county at an early day. Jotham was born in 1805, and married in 1826 Maria Haynes, of Starkey, Yates county, who bore him eleven children, as follows: Lydia, born in 1828; Charles, born in 1830, Coe, born in 1833, Mary, born in 1835; Squire, born in 1836, died in 1844; Jotham born in 1838; Arnold G., born in 1847; Sarah, born in 1841; Phila A., born in 1845; Squire, born in 1849; and Isaac W., born in 1852. Jotham was assessor for many years, and died in 1888, his wife dying four years earlier. His son Charles was educated at the district schools and remained at his father's home until after twenty-one years of age, then went to Ohio and worked at jobbing on a railroad and farming two years. He returned to Canadice, and in 1857 married Mary E. Pulver, daughter of Henry W. and Mary (Northrup) Pulver, who were early settlers of this town, her father coming from Kinderhook, where he was a schoolmate of Martin Van Buren, and her mother from Saratoga county. Mr. Coykendall has one daughter, Flora, born March 20, 1866, wife of Dr. W. D. Becker, jr., both graduates of the Normal School of Geneseo, class of 1887. Dr. Becker is also a graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York. Miss Coykendall accepted a position as preceptress of the Union School at Livonia, where she remained three years, Dr. Becker being in New York. They have one child, Ruth L. E., born in 1892. Mr. Coykendall is a farmer on the old place, owing 128 acres and farming 228. He has recently introduced Dakota spring rye, of which he has grown 449 bushels from twenty-seven bushels sown. He is a Republican.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Coe Haynes Coykendall
, Canadice, son of Jotham, was born February 20, 1833, where he now resides.  He worked on the farm until he married in 1854 Caroline S. Purcell, daughter of John and Almira (Hubbard) Purcell, the former born in Hunterdon county NJ, and the latter in Washington county NY.  Mr. Purcell settled in 1821 in Richmond, coming with his father, Benjamin, and Mrs. Purcell came with her father, Solomon Hubbard, in 1813 to Gorham, and later to Canadice.  Mr. and Mrs. Coykendall have had five children:  George H., born in 1856, now a farmer in Lima; Frank H., born in 1857, also a farmer; Everett E., born in 1861, a street car conductor in Rochester; Grant S., born in Michigan in 1865, resides with his parents, and John P. was born here in 1873 and is now in school.  In 1864 Mr. Coykendall went to Michigan, where he remained four years, then returned and settled on the old homestead which was built by his father in 1849, and has been repaired by Coe H.  The latter has been highway commissioner and collector.  He is a Populist in politics.  He owns 150 acres of land and is engaged in general farming.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Coyle, Charles M., Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, December 11, 1847, where he has always lived, except three years (1865-68) spent in Rochester.  In 1870 he engaged in the grocery and liquor business here under the firm name of C. & P. Coyle, the latter being a cousin, who in 1877 withdrew from the firm, and Charles conducted the business alone for three years.  He was then joined by Thomas P., making the firm Coyle Bros., which it still remains. In 1887 they added to their business the wholesale and retail dealing in tobacco and smokers' articles. In 1877 Mr. Coyle was elected village treasurer, and in 1890 trustee, which office he still holds.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Silas G. Craft
, Gorham, a native of Seneca, was born August 5, 1817, a son of Thomas, a native of New Pans NY, who came to Seneca when a young man, and there married Martha Glann, by whom he had three sons and one daughter.  Mrs. Craft died in 1820, and he married second, Derinda Polmateer, by whom he had children.  He died in Michigan in 1870.  Silas G. married Lydia W. Mellen, a native of Massachusetts, born March 25, 1823.  She was a daughter of Collister and Lucinda (Denham) Mellen, natives of Massachusetts, the former born March 27 1798.  They were married December 8, 1822, and had a son and daughter.  In 1823 they went to Gorham and settled on the farm where subject now resides.  He was assessor and superintendent of the poor seventeen years.  He was very liberal in all public enterprises, and died in Gorham September 23, 1860.  His wife died March 21, 1879.  Lucinda Denham was a daughter of Cornelius and Lydia (Wells) Denham, natives of Massachusetts.  Mr. Denham died in 1829, and his wife in 1848.  Subject and wife have two sons, Collister F., born November 15, 1844; and Charles B., born October 21, 1818.  The former was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and July 20, 1866, married Estelle Cole, a native of Michigan, by whom he had four children:  Byron L., who was educated in Canandaigua Academy and is at present a graduate of the Medical University of Buffalo, and in the practice of his profession; George H., who was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and is in the Medical University of Buffalo; Lula A., a teacher educated in Geneseo Normal School; and Nellie educated in Canandaigua Union School, also a teacher.  Collister F. Craft learned the drug business in Medina, and afterwards went to Quincy Michigan where he was in business for himself several years.  He returned to Gorham, and in 1887, he engaged in the insurance business, and has been very successful.  He represents the "American" of Philadelphia, "Royal" of Liverpool, and "Caledonian" of Scotland, the "Aetna Live Stock" of Glens Falls, and "Security Mutual Life Association," of Binghamton.  He also deals in real estate.  Mrs. Craft is a daughter of Lyman and Julia (Sherman) Cole, natives of Jefferson county, who went to Michigan in 1835, and died in Branch county, he in 1882, and his wife in 1875.  They had nine sons and four daughters.  Charles B. Craft married August 2 1871, Martha A. Lewis of Gorham, born September 9, 1850, a daughter of James G. Lewis, son of Sylvester, who came to Gorham in 1808.  He died in 1873, and his wife in 1879.  James G. Lewis was born in Gorham in 1822, and married Ellen Van Busum, by whom he had one son and three daughters.  Mrs. Lewis died in 1885, and the father lives on the old homestead.  Charles B. Craft and wife have one son, Lewis M., a farmer.  In politics Mr. Craft is a Democrat.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Crandall, W. D.
, Canandaigua, was born in West Bloomfield, March 10, 1845, a son of Nelson, formerly a mechanic of that town, now of Delaware county.  Nelson was born in 1809, and at the age of twenty-one moved into Ontario county. He married Melissa A. Wood, of this county, by whom he had six children, four of whom are living; Mrs. Rush Crandall, of Delaware county; Sheridan, of the Eighty-fifth Regiment N.Y. Volunteers, who was wounded at the battle of Fair Oaks, taken prisoner, and died in prison; C. E. Crandall, a lawyer of Muncie, Ind.; Fred D. Crandall, of Crandall Bros. W. D. Crandall was educated at West Bloomfield and at Lima Seminary, and after leaving school came to Canandaigua, where he went into the photographing establishment of Marshal M. Finley & Son to learn the art.  He was with them for fifteen years. He spent two years in Jamestown, then returned to Canandaigua and bought a half interest in the Finley gallery, which he retained about three years, and then, in partnership with his brother Fred, opened an establishment for himself. Their gallery is now located in the Hubbell block, where they make a specialty of crayon work.  He married in 1887 Julia E. Johnson, of Canandaigua. Mr. And Mrs. Crandall are attendants of the Presbyterian church.  Mr. Crandall was in 1888 elected as one of the village council.



From Ontario County Times 14 January 1874

Mr. Editor: - I have been very much interested in the "Early History" in your paper, and as the name Elam Crane is often mentioned as one of the early settlers and a school teacher, it has occurred to me that a few incidents of his life, which came under my observation, might not be unacceptable to your readers. My first acquaintance with him was in the year 1806, when he taught school in a log house near the present site of the South Friend's meeting house, in Farmington. This was my first experience in going to school -- walking two miles for that purpose mostly through the woods, which other children from the same neighborhood. I distinctly recollect being at school on the day of the total eclipse of the sun, in June, 1806, known ever since, by way of distinction, as the great eclipse. As the eclipse came on Mr. Crane dismissed his school, and selected a suitable place out of doors for observation, he gathered the scholars around him and explained to them the cause of the wonderful phenomenon which they were observing. The scenes of that day made such an impression on my mind that they never can be effaced from my memory.

Mr. Crane taught school for several terms in succession in the same house, and in winter his school was attended by the grown up children of Welcome and Joshua Herendeen, John McUmber, Nathan Aldrich, John Dillon, Mr. Tiffany, and other pioneers of that vicinity. Mr. Crane's family resided, at that time, about one mile east of Littleville, on a farm afterwards, and for many years in the possession of the Archer family, and since owned by T. J. Coates. Master Crane, as he was familiarly called, visited his old patrons in this town occasionally for many years afterwards, and frequently came here to attend the religious meetings of the Friends, to which society he appeared to be warmly attached. At the first county convention of town superintendents of schools, held in Canandaigua in 1843 or 1844, Mr. Crane was present, and furnished some interesting reminiscences of the first county court ever held in Ontario county.

Sarah Crane, daughter of Elam Crane, taught a district school in this town in the summer of 1844. The writer, in company with A. Hopkins, county superintendent, visited her school, and found her to be an efficient and accomplished teacher.
Daniel Arnold, Farmington, Jan., 1874.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Oscar N. Crane, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua in 1836, a son of John, who was born in this village in 1792. His father, Elam, was one of the old pioneer school teachers of this State; he was a native of Connecticut. He located in Canandaigua one of the earliest settlers, and made his home in the later years of his life in the southern part of this town, where he died in 1845 leaving eight children, of whom John was the oldest. He always made this town his home, and the greater part of his life was spent on the farm. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and an influential man in his town. He died in this village in 1872, leaving three children of a family of six: Sidney of Detroit, Mich.; Mary A., wife of D. C. Benham, of Hopewell; and Oscar N. With the exception of one year spent in Buffalo the latter has always lived in this county. He was educated at Canandaigua Academy, and after leaving school followed farming summers, and taught in the winter. In 1865 he established an office as a funeral director and dealer in burial goods in Canandaigua, which he still conducts. He is assisted by William C. Ball, a professional embalmer. Mr. Crane married in 1850 Mary J., daughter of Thomas Benham of Hopewell, and they have three children: Ella E., a teacher of mathematics in the public school; Oscar Benham and Carrie C. Mr. Crane was for twenty-one years in active service in the Canandaigua fire department, and for fifteen consecutive years was chief of the department. He has been president of the Canandaigua Cemetery Association since its organization in 1884, and is also a member of the Board of Education. He is president of the Protective Life Insurance Association of Rochester, a Mason, and an elder of the First Presbyterian Church, of which his family are members.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Crawford, Joseph S., Canandaigua, was born in Yates county in 1842, a son of Captain Samuel, a native of Massachusetts, where he was born in 1808.  He followed the sea for a number of years, then married Rachel Plaisted, of English descent, and they settled first in New York, where they remained a few years, then came to Yates county, where Mr. Crawford died in 1850, leaving five children, of whom Joseph S. was the only son.  His early life was spent in Yates county, where he was educated in a private school under Prof. Robert Murray, and his first occupation, was a clerk in a shoe store in Penn Yan. In 1863 he came to Canandaigua and was a clerk in the War Office, provost marshal's department, until the close of the war. He then spent two years as bookkeeper in the Canandaigua First National Bank, after which he purchased an interest in the clothing business, forming a partnership with D. Shafer, which lasted until 1886, when Mr. Shafer retired and Mr. Crawford became sole proprietor.  The store has been located at No. 4 Bank block ever since the erection of the block in 1858. Mr. Crawford married in 1865 Mary K., daughter of John S. Gibson.  Mrs. Crawford died in February, 1866. Mr. Crawford is a Republican, and a member of St. John's Episcopal church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Creighton, James, Geneva, was born in County Fermenaugh, Ireland, about 1835, and came to the United States in 1872, locating in Geneva.  December 7, 1857, he married Mrs. Mary (Wiggins) Reynolds.  They had six children:  Eliza, Elizabeth A., James, Susan, Mary E. and Jennie. Mrs. Creighton had three children by her first marriage:  John, Margaret and Thomas.  Elizabeth married Edward Pendle, of Geneva, and they have one daughter, Mersible L.  Susan married Charles H. Pendle, of Geneva.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Ira P. Cribb, Canandaigua, was born in South Bristol, February 21, 1851, a son of Joseph P. Cribb, a native on Onondaga county, born in Tully, April 28, 1816 who came with his father to Ontario county when a boy. He has always been a farmer, and for the last twenty years has lived in Naples. He married Elenor J., daughter of Richard Francis, a native of Wales. They were the parents of seven children, five of whom are living: Mrs. Nancy E. Parsons, of Providence, R. I.; F. R. Cribb of Naples, superintendent of pleasure resorts at Silver Lake and Lake Erie, formerly an undertaker of Naples; C. A. Cribb, a lumber manufacturer of Smyrna, Mich.; Mrs. E. H. Johnson of Naples; and Ira P. The early life of the latter was spent in South Bristol. He was educated in the common schools and at Naples Academy. In 1872 he came to Canandaigua, where he has since resided. For the last three years he has been in the employ of the town in the making of stone roads, and has been one of the board of commissioners in the town since 1890, and has built about twelve miles of road. Mr. Cribb has always taken an interest in the success of the Republican party, and is an active member of the Methodist Church, in which he has held numerous offices, now being trustee. He married in 1872 Emily A., daughter of Jonas Wolverton, who died less than three years later. He married second Stella F., daughter of Samuel Douglass, of Canandaigua, and they have one child, Fred D., now in his thirteenth year.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

A. R. Crittenden, Phelps, was born in Phelps, December 17, 1824, one of four children of Osee and Rachael (Glover) Crittenden. The grandfather, Osee Crittenden, was born in Conway, Mass., of English descent, and came to Phelps with his family during the boyhood of his son. The ancestors of Rachael Glover were also Massachusetts people of English descent. A. R. Crittenden married, December 19, 1846, N. A. Stewart, daughter of Daniel and Ann (Peck) Stewart. Daniel Stewart, the father, was born in Deerfield, Oneida county, April 28, 1797. Jabez, Daniel's father, was of Scotch descent, his father, Daniel, emigrated from Scotland about the year 1760, and finally settled in Brattleboro, Vt., afterward removing to Deerfield, Oneida county. A. R. Crittenden has one son, DeLaney S. Crittenden, now of Buffalo. DeLaney S. Crittenden married Lillian S. Fitch, of Wolcott, March 13, 1881, having issue one son, Percy A. Crittenden, born in Phelps, October 26, 1888.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893

Stalham Crittenden, Phelps, was born in Phelps, April 30, 1827, one of seven children of Cotton and Esther (Rice) Crittenden, both of whom came to Phelps from Conway, Mass., in early life. Osee Crittenden, the grandfather, came from Massachusetts also. Mr. Crittenden married November 16, 1856, M. A. Knapp, of Hopewell, daughter of John and Louisa (Warner) Knapp of that town. They have one son, Clarence K., who married in 1879 Grace, daughter of George W. and Adaline (Humphrey) Van Auken. They have three children: Alice W., Mark C. and Rose. Mr. Crittenden has always in the town, and is one of the representative citizens. He has served for twelve years continuously as assessor.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rev. Lewis W. Cronk, Victor, was born in Victor, May 24, 1810, and was educated in the common and private schools of his native town. While attending the M. E. Church meetings in 1843 he was converted, and was soon after licensed to exhort, and afterwards a local preacher until 1873, when he changed his church relationship, casting his lot with the Free Methodists, joining their conference and church at the above date, and is at present an ordained elder in that church organization. July 4, 1843, he married Angeline, daughter of Jonathan and Catherine Benson, of Pekin, Niagara county. They have one adopted daughter, Ida Benson, who married Philetus Skuse, who was in the late war in Company C, 111th Regiment N. Y. S. Infantry, and they have two daughters,  who are married. Mr. Cronk's father, Jeremiah, was born near Cooperstown, Otsego county, in 1787, and married Philena Lewis of his native place, formerly of Massachusetts. They had eight children: William, Daniel, Elizabeth, Miranda, Lewis W., Emily, Nancy J., and Mary. Mrs. Cronk's father, Jonathan Benson, was born in Springfield, Otsego county, march 24, 1799, and married Catherine Anderson of his native place, and moved with his wife and two children to Niagara county in 1823. They had six children: Angeline, John, Elijah A., Isaac, Mary M., and Sarah A. Mr. Benson was a preacher of the gospel from the age of maturity until his death, November 20, 1884. Mrs. Cronk's brother Isaac was the father of their adopted daughter and also was a soldier in the late war, in the band of the One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment New York Volunteers, where he lost his life. Mr. Cronk's brother, Daniel, had three sons and a son-in-law in the late war.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Tompkins Abbey Crooks, Richmond, was born September 14, 1826. His grandfather, David, a native of Blanford, Mass., first came to Richmond in 1799, on his return from a prospecting tour in Ohio. Struck with the beauty of the country here in the Indian summer time, he bought a farm which he afterwards sold to Elias Gilbert, and the next February came with his wife and settled thereon. She was a grandniece of General Knox of Revolutionary fame, and he was of Scotch descent. They had eight children, one of whom, David K., learned milling. His father died in 1812 from an injury received in the mill. David K. married in 1822 Sinai, daughter of John Abbey. She was born in 1803, and died in 1890. They had two sons: Tompkins A. and John K. The latter, born in 1830, became a physician, and married Martha Wheeler for his first wife, and Carrie Gray for his second wife, by whom he had one son, deceased. He died in 1876, and his widow resides at East Bloomfield. David K. lived most of his life where his son Tompkins now lives. When but thirteen years of age he drew from the mill in Richmond, with a double ox team, twenty-five barrels of flour to the American army encamped at Buffalo, and on his return loaded the sleigh with munitions of war for the arsenal at Batavia. Tompkins A. Crooks was educated at a select school at Allen's Hill and at Lima Seminary, and has followed farming all his life. He married in 1846 Helen C., daughter of Tillness Bentley 2d, and their only daughter, Ellen Amelie, born in 1847, is the wife of Mark Leech, and now living almost opposite. Mr. Crooks is a Democrat, and his wife and daughter are Episcopalians. Tillness Bentley 2d was born in 1792, and came from Saratoga. He married Lorada Baker, daughter of William. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, under Major Allen, and was at Lundy's Lane. He had six children, of whom Mrs. Crooks was the fourth. He was a leading spirit in the organization of the old M. E. church, which stood east of Abbey's Corners, the first services of which were held in Mr. Baker's barn. The locality was early called Baker's Hill.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Theodore Crosby. 
In the year 1813 Enoch Crosby, with his wife and a large family of children emigrated from Dutchess county to Ontario county and took up their abode in the town of Phelps, about one and one-half miles south of the village (then known as Vienna).  Here both the pioneer and his faithful wife died; he aged seventy-seven and his wife seventy-nine years. In their family were twelve children, and all of them are dead but two:  Alfred of Phelps; and Theodore of Canandaigua.  Theodore Crosby, the subject of this sketch, was born in Dutchess county, November 7, 1802, hence, at the time of his father's removal to Phelps was a lad of eleven years.  Until twenty-two years old Theodore lived at home and worked on the farm, but in 1824, he started out to make his own way in life.  He married Melinda, daughter of Elam Crane, and at once moved to a farm near the city of Rochester, where he remained five years, then sold his farm and returned to Ontario county.  One year later he bought a farm in Hopewell and there he lived until 1861, when he moved to the county seat and devotes the remainder of his active business life to dealing in cattle, sheep and general stock.  In this pursuit he is still engaged, and although ninety-one years of age still retains all his mental faculties and enjoys business life seemingly as well as he did half a century ago.  From what we have stated here it must appear that Mr. Crosby has led a very busy life, and we may say in addition that, notwithstanding the multitude of his business transactions and operations, he has never been charged with unfairness or deceit; on the contrary, it is said by his old acquaintances and associates that his business has ever been characterized by straightforward honesty and integrity, and his success has been as well merited as it has been abundant.  Mr. Crosby married Melinda Crane in 1825, and their married life extended throughout a period of sixty years, and until her death in 1885, at the age of eighty years.  Of their children only one grew to maturity, Marietta, who became the wife of Charles Hopkins, and now lives in Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Adam Crosier, Seneca, was born at Hall's Corners, September 2, 1823. He was educated in the schools of that day and was a conductor on the New York and Erie Railroad until 1850. Since that time he has been a farmer. August 23, 1853, he married Gertrude Haug of Battle Creek, Mich., and they have two daughters: Gertrude, who married Lewis Watson, jr., who died August 19, 1891; she now resides with her parents; and Clara B., who married Wallace C. Squire of this town. They have one daughter, Edith Christine. Mr. Crosier's father, George, was born in Northumberland, England, in 1784, and came to the United States in 1801 with his parents, locating near Hall's Corners. He married Abigail Crawford of Saratoga Springs, and they had eight children: Jefferson, Adam, Henderson, Thomas W., George W., Elizabeth Isabella, and Mary J. His father died January 10, 1873, and his mother June 18, 1870. Mrs. Crosier's father, George Haug, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1796, and married Katrina Buher of his native place, and had these children: George, Rosina, John, Christina, Michiel, Caroline, Gertrude and William. The family and six children came to the United States in 1828. Her father died in 1832, and her mother resides here, aged ninety-six years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Oliver G. Crothers, Phelps, was born in Phelps, January 12, 1819. His father, William, was born in Orange county, and came to Phelps when fourteen years of age, where he lived and died. His wife, Eunice (Dunham) Crother, was born in Massachusetts. Oliver G. married December 11, 1861, Mary Ridley of Phelps, and they had three children: William L. (Mrs. Dr. J. H. Haslett) and Mary, (Mrs. William K. McCoy. The mother died in July, 1870. In 1873 he married Eunice Nye of Newark, N. Y., and they have one child, Nellie E. Mr. Crothers has been in the malting business for over twenty-five years and has been very successful. He is one of the influential men of the town, has served several terms as president of the corporation, and also as trustee. In 1883, he built the Crothers block, which is a credit to the village.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Erastus H. Crowell
, West Bloomfield, was born June 11, 1831, at Miller's Corners.  His father, Silas, a native of Massachusetts, was born in 1792, and came with his father to Miller's Corners in 1798.  Silas has related that when a boy he, with his brother two years older, were walking in the road near their house when suddenly a bear confronted them in the road and disputed their right to go on, but they had a small dog with them which bit at the bear's heels and worried him so that the boys had time to escape.  Silas joined an independent company and was for three months on guard duty in Canada on the Niagara frontier during the War of 1812, and was of the escort of General Harrison on his return from Tecumseh.  He married for his second wife in 1822 Alsena, daughter of Luman Kilbourne, and had four children:  Simeon S. of Grand Rapids MI, Erastus H., Eleanor A., born in 1833, died in 1886, and Lydia J., born in 1844 and died in 1853.  Silas died in 1868 and his wife in 1878.  Erastus H. was educated at the common schools and at Lima Seminary, and has been a farmer most of his life. From 1861 to 1871 he was engaged in the insurance business, and is a Republican.  He married in 1853, Mandana E., daughter of Perrine Fay of Ohio, who was a native of Massachusetts.  Mrs. Crowell was born in Madison county and they are both members of the Universalist Church at North Bloomfield and supporters of the M. E. Church at Miller's Corners.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Crowley, Daniel, Manchester, was born in Ireland, September 10, 1843.  He came to this country in 1855.  After a time, through hard work and economical efforts, he was enabled to purchase the farm upon which he now lives.  Mr. Crowley married Margaret Chancey, and they have eight children.  Mr. Crowley has served as pathmaster, and is a staunch Democrat.



From Phelps Citizen 17 April 1919

The Cuddeback family came from Orange Co., New York. Abram Cuddeback, who married Deborah Swartout, appears to be the first. A portion of their children were born in Orange county. Cornelius Cuddeback, well-known through his long life, born in 1828, married in Phelps, Phebe Doty. He died in 1899. Another son, Samuel, married Jennie Hooper. He died in 1911, aged 74 years. William W. married, 1862, Elvira Hoffman. She died 1902. Jane Cuddeback married J. Spencer Van Demark, and resided in town most, if not all, their lives, celebrating their golden wedding.

The family of the older stock were long lived. The original immigrant was one Jacob Cuddeback, a French Huguenot born in Normandy. He came to America in 1685 and settled in Neversink Valley, near Port Jervis. He had a patent of 1200 acres of land, three-fifths of which were in possession of descendants only a few years ago. Thomas Cuddeback, a grandson 
died there in 1917, aged 95 years. Hon. Cornelius E. Cuddeback, president of Minisink Historical society, died in September, 1918. om Port Jervis. He was of Yale College and long years Elder in the Reformed church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George S. Cummings, Geneva, was born in Plymouth, N. Y., January 4, 1829, was educated in the common schools of his day, and in early life was a cabinet-maker. This he had to give up on account of failing health, and he was a conductor on the Lehigh Valley Railway, one year as freight conductor, and eight as passenger conductor, and five as car agent. September 30, 1854, he married Sarah A. Emery of Maltborough, and they had three children: Arthur E., died age four; Carrie L. and Amy E., who lives at home. Mr. Cummings has resided in Geneva since 1874. He is preparing a shop with fine machinery for all kinds of wood and job work. His great-great-grandfather, Jonathan G. Cummings, was one of the first settlers in Plymouth,
N. H.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Curlin, Mrs. Nancy T. P
., Geneva, was born in Geneva, where she was educated in the public schools and taught with the Rev. H. H. . Garnet, D.D., two years. She was the second daughter of Aaron Lucas and was married in 1854 to Robert H. Curlin, a classical teacher.  She taught school in the West Indies twenty-five years, and returned to the United States in 1878.  Mrs. Curlin's father was born a slave in Virginia.  He gained his freedom by the underground railway in 1825, and married Flora Duncan, of the Mohawk Valley, who was a New York State slave.  They had three children:  Esther, who married John Grant; Nancy .T. P., and Charles R. who died at the age of twenty-five years.  Her father died in 1884 and her mother in 1850, both in Geneva.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Leon A. Currey, postmaster of Geneva and prominent Republican, was born at Sodus, March 26, 1895, the son of Lyman A. Currey and Anna B. Allen.  His business is that of undertaker and embalmer, in which he engaged for a number of years, at present being a member of the firm of Currey and Corwin. He was chairman of the Republican City Committee from 1925 to 1930; city clerk, 1926-29 and in 1931 was appointed postmaster. He served as a sergeant in Company B, 108th infantry, during the World War and received a citation for bravery in France. In 1921 he served as commander of the local post of the American Legion. He is a member of Ark Lodge F. & A. M.; the Elks; I. O. O. F. and the Chamber of Commerce.



CURTIS

Subject: Ontario County website
Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2001 01:09:27 EST
From: Helencrosskelly@aol.com

Luther and Lois (Miner) Curtis resided and were members of the 1st Congregational Church in West Bloomfield as early as 1802.  Lois was a descendant of Mayflower passenger William Brewster and the daughter of Martin Miner and Elizabeth Davis.  Martin died 11/1/1820 and Elizabeth died 3/14/1819 and both are buried in West Bloomfield.  Luther was related to the Ebenezer Curtis who was one of the first proprietors of West Bloomfield.  Luther was the son of Aaron Curtis and Hannah Griswold.

In 1848 the church there dismissed them to Grand Blanc, Genesee County, Michigan where Luther and Lois died and are buried in Evergreen Cemetery.  Their children were all born in West Bloomfield and baptized at that church, as follows:

1.  Marvin Miner Curtis, baptized 1802
2.  Amanda Curtis born ca 1802.  She married Grant Watkins.  They also went to Grand Blanc.  Grant died there and is buried in the same cemetery as Luther and Lois.
3.  Rosanna married Charles Dewstoe 8/7/1836 in West Bloomfield.  They also went to Michigan with Luther and Lois.
4.  Elizabeth born 10/16/1804 married Miles Carter on 3/25/1830 in West Bloomfield.  She was a teacher and Miles was a farmer.  Elizabeth died 11/13/1892 in Fairport, N. Y.
5.  Richard Curtis baptized 1805, died 7/25/1825.
6.  Ebenezer Bishop Curtis (my ancestor) was born 1/23/1809 in West Bloomfield and died 2/26/1856 in Dubuque, Iowa.  He was buried the same day in Linwood Cemetery in Dubuque.  He married 3/5/1833 in Cuyahoga County, Ohio,  Louise Jewell, the daughter of Ephraim Jewell and Octavia Holdridge.  Louisa was born 7/4/1811 in St. Albans, Vermont and died 5/31/1888 in Dubuque, Iowa.
7.  Luther Martin Curtis baptized 1815.
8.  Oliver Butrick Curtis baptized 1817, died 3/17/1822.

Is there any graveyard information on these people?  I would like to know where those that died there are buried. Kindly donated by Helen Cross Kelly.



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