"Ch" to "Col" Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Chapin, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, March 11, 1817, a son of George, who was a son of Israel. George was a native of Connecticut, and when young came to Canandaigua. He received a college education and was heir to a large amount of real estate in Ontario and Young counties. He married Dollie Catlin, a native of Connecticut, by whom he had four sons and three daughters. He and his wife both died in Hopewell. Charles Chapin married Hannah Lincoln, a native of Hopewell, born in 1813. Her father was Artemas Lincoln, who came with his parents, Otis and Hannah Lincoln, from Massachusetts, and settled in New York. Artemas married Sarah Hunt, a native of Wyoming, Pa., by whom he had two sons and two daughters: Eliza, wife of George Moss of Canandaigua, and Florence, wife of Byron Childs of Hopewell. Mr. Chapin also had an adopted son, Charles, who died in the late war. Mr. Chapin lives on the farm of eighty acres which he now owns, and which is part of the Lincoln homestead. He is a Democrat, and has been assessor a number of years. Mr. Chapin is a member of the Presbyterian church at Canandaigua, and the family attend and support the same.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Erastus A. Chapin,
West Bloomfield, was born June 18, 1844.  His father, Rev. Asa Chapin, was a minister of the Christian denomination, and preached without salary.  He was a native of Gilsum, N. H. and first settled in Steuben county about 1823.  About 1825 he came to West Bloomfield and married a year later Cornelia Simons born in 1804.  Her father, Jeremiah, came here from Lynn about 1800, and died in 1805.  Mr. Chapin died about two years ago, and his wife survives him, aged eighty-eight.  They had five children;  Erastus A. was educated in the common schools and Lima Seminary.  In September, 1864, he enlisted in Company C, First N. Y. Light Artillery, known as Reynold's Battery, and was discharged from service in June, 1865, on the day he came of age.  He is assessor and overseer of the poor, and is a Republican.  He married in 1872 Frances C., daughter of Newell D. Gerry, who in early life came to Livingston county from Vermont.  They have two daughters:  Lottie May and Cornelia Belle.
 


From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George V. Chapin, Hopewell, was born in Canandaigua. Early in life, deprived by death of his father's counsel and assistance, the son through his own exertion and application, supported and educated himself, completing his studies in the Canandaigua Academy. He taught in district schools during the winter season for several years, employing the remainder of his time in attending school, and the summer vacation in farm work. He had charge of the public schools in the village of East Bloomfield, Clifton Springs and Canandaigua, for a number of years, when his health failing, he left school work and for two years was engaged in the real estate and insurance business in Cleveland, O., and in railroad enterprise in West Virginia. His first appearance in politics was his election, upon the Democratic ticket, to the office of Justice of the peace, which position he filled with so much ability that he had but one appeal taken from his decisions, and in that he was sustained by the higher court. In 1874 he returned to Ontario county, and the next year was elected school commissioner in the eastern district of that county, to which position he was twice elected. In 1877, though already holding a State certificate, he submitted to an examination and received the first State certificate granted to a school commissioner upon this plan, and for three years was the only commissioner in the State holding such a document. Mr. Chapin has been an active member of educational associations, and read papers upon important questions, particularly before the State Association of School Commissioners and City Superintendents, among which was one advocating a plan for grading of public schools, another upon commissioners' qualifications and in behalf of that body, he presented to the Legislature of 1880, a bill requiring certain qualifications for persons to be eligible to the office of school commissioner. He was for two years vice-president, and in 1881 president of the same association. In 1870, upon his motion, and largely through his efforts, the Ontario County Teachers' Association was formed, and with the exception of his two years' absence from the county, he has been one of its ablest supporters. Mr. Chapin retains his place of residence at the old Capt. Chapin homestead in Chapinville. He has been in the general management of the North American Dredging and Improvement co., of New York city, closing his active relations with them in 1890, and is at present associated with B. C. Howell in pumping out the water of Lake Angeline, Michigan. The father of George V., was Henry Chapin, who was one of the leading merchants in Canandaigua and died in San Francisco, September 30, 1850. He was a son of Urial, a native of Connecticut who came to Seneca Falls, where he died. His wife was a Miss Pratt, by whom he had four children: Ralph, Cornelia, and Laura. Ralph was cashier in the Utica Branch Bank in Canandaigua, and afterwards was county treasurer of Ontario county for nine years. Henry Chapin came to Canandaigua and married Cynthia M. Chapin, a native of Chapinville, N. Y. and daughter of Henry Chapin, son of General Israel Chapin, aid-de-camp to Gen. Washington, and the first Indian agent in Western New York. Israel Chapin came from Hatfield, Mass., to Canandaigua. His wife was a Miss Marsh, by whom he had the following children: Thaddeus, Israel, Henry, George, Betsey, Annie, Lois and Sallie. Israel Chapin, jr., was captain in the State militia. The children of Henry Chapin and wife were: James H., who resides on the homestead of Capt. Israel Chapin, jr., in Chapinville, N. Y.; Ralph P., a builder and contractor in Jackson, Mich.; William H., deceased; and George V. resides the most of his time with his brother, Edward, who is a physician in Brooklyn, N. Y.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Harry G. Chapin, East Bloomfield, was born where he now resides July 18, 1849, a son of Oliver C. and Francis W. (Smith) Chapin. The grandfather, Heman, son of Charles, came from Salisbury, Conn., to Bloomfield in 1796, and settled north of the village, where he owned and improved 400 acres. His brother Oliver came in 1790 and located where the subject now resides. Heman was assemblyman one term. He married Electa Humphrey and had three sons and five daughters. Oliver C. was born in 1811 (April 26) in Bloomfield, and died April 3, 1881. He was the owner of an orchard of 135 acres, and has taken from it as high as 10,000 barrels, and his father was the originator of the Northern Spy apple and the Early Joe. He had four children: Frank S., Harry G., Julia E., and Charles. Harry G. was educated in the district schools in early youth, and graduated at Yale College, class of '72. He has been serving his second term as justice, and his first as supervisor, being a Republican in politics. He married Adaline, daughter of Joseph W. and Nancy (Loomis) Hopson. His father was one of the organizers of Bloomfield Academy.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Robert Simons Chapin, West Bloomfield, son of Rev. Asa Chapin, was born in 1830, was educated in the district schools, and worked on his father's farm. In 1862 he bought a farm adjoining the homestead of sixty years, which he sold to his brother in 1872, then buying 105 acres where he now resides, also adjoining the homestead. In 1872 he married Elizabeth A., daughter of Rev. David Millard, a former pastor of the Christian Church in the village, who traveled extensively in the East and published a book, "Millard's Arabia, Petria and the Holy Land." Mrs. Chapin died August 7, 1886, and he married second in 1887 Sarah Kyle, of this town, born in 1861, and they have had three children: Robert A., Reynold S., and Elizabeth Ann. Mr. Chapin is a staunch Republican. August 10, 1888, he raised the first campaign pole in the county, 100 feet, to a crowd of 1,500 people, the largest political gathering in the town in fifty years, and also assisted in raising fifteen other poles the same season, singing eighty-six times in public during the campaign.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Chapin, Thaddeus, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, January 21, 1803, a son of Thaddeus, a native of Worcester, Mass, where he was born September 6, 1761.  He was a son of General Israel Chapin, the first Indian agent appointed by General Washington for the Six Nations.  He was a general in the War of the Revolution. He was the father of four sons and three daughters.  About the time of the Phelps and Gorham purchase General Chapin and his four sons:  Thaddeus, Israel, Henry and George, came to this town and took up land.  Thaddeus, father of our subject, held a patent for 600 acres where the village of Canandaigua west of Maine street is now built.  In 1821 he erected the large dwelling which has ever been the homestead of this family.  Mr. Chapin remembers the Indian chief, Red Jacket, and he and Farmer's Brother, the white man's friend, often visited his father's house.  Thaddeus Chapin street, where stands the residence of our subject, was laid out by Thaddeus Chapin about 1815 on his own property, and named in his honor at the incorporation of the village. Thaddeus Chapin, sr., had seven children, of whom two are now living:  Eliza Chapin, of this village, and Thaddeus, our subject.  The latter was educated at Canandaigua Academy, and in 1830 he was elected trustee of the academy, and at the death of Judge Phelps was elected president, which position he has held until 1891, when he resigned. Mr. Chapin has never taken any active interest in politics, but in early life was a supporter of the Federalist party and of late years has been a Democrat. He married in 1832 Rebecca, daughter of James D. Bemis, one of the early settlers of this town, and they had six children, three of whom are living:  Anna M., widow of Capt. T. E. Munson, who fought in the Rebellion and died in 1884; Laura B., wife of Frank G. Clark, a merchant of Oxford, Chenango county; and George B., a bookkeeper of Canandaigua.  There is but one grandchild of this family, Walter C. Munson, now in his seventeenth year, a student of Canandaigua Academy. Mr. And Mrs. Chapin celebrated their golden wedding in 1882, and Mrs. Chapin died December 27, 1888.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles G. Chapman, Gorham, was born in Windsor, Mass., June 20, 1820. His father was Ezra, son of Ezra, who lived and died in Massachusetts. Ezra, jr., was born in Massachusetts and reared on a farm. He married Bessie Taft,  and had ten children. Mr. Chapman died in Massachusetts in 1804. Charles G. was educated in the common schools, and married Selinda Pierce, by whom he had three sons and one daughter: George W., who married Miss Dinister and had one child; Edward at home; and Frank P. in Rochester. In 1860 Mr. Chapman came to Gorham and bought a farm of 144 acres to which he afterwards added twenty-five acres. He is a Republican and has been highway commissioner, and is a member of the Congregational church at Rushville.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Rev. Jedediah Chapman, born at East Haddam, Conn., died at Geneva May 22, 1813, in the 73d year of his age. Ordained and installed at Orangedale, N. J., in 1766; removed to Geneva in 1800, as stated missionary of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, Geneva, July 8, 1812. Was one of the incorporators of the Geneva Academy.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Roscoe G. Chase, Geneva, was born in the town of Buckfield, Oxford county, Mr., November 3, 1837, and was the second child and eldest son of Thomas and Esther Chase. His early life was spent on his father's farm, but in November, 1862, he enlisted as private in a regiment of Maine infantry and served about seven months. He then went to California, where he taught school, but after some time returned home, and engaged in farming and growing and dealing in nursery stock. The latter employment occasioned frequent visits to the famous nursery regions of Ontario county, and induced him in 1872 to move to this locality. He began active business with about seventy-five acres of nursery land, but has increased his productions to 150 acres at the present time. Mr. Chase is regarded as one of the progressive, successful business men of the county, and one interested in public as well as private enterprises. During the summer of 1892 he caused to be drilled a mineral well, whose valuable water is free to all who desire it for drinking purposes. Mr. Chase is also interested in various other  business enterprises, all of which are beneficial to Geneva village and the locality. In 1864 Mr. Chase was married to Eliza E. Gerrish, by whom he has had two children, only one of whom is living.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William D. Chase, Geneva, was born in Buckfield, Oxford county, Me., August 6, 1852, and was the youngest but one of the children of Thomas and Esther Chase. He came to Geneva in 1882, and became manager of the retail nursery business of R. G. Chase & Co., at which he continued until 1887, when he engaged in the insurance business, of which he had made special study, and in which he took great interest. In the same year associated with D. J. Van Auken, he founded the Manufacturers' Accident Indemnity Company, starting practically with nothing but energy and determination, and eventually building up one of the most reliable and substantial mutual accident associations in the country. To the management of this company Mr. Chase devotes his entire time, and its success is largely due to the efforts of himself and those immediately associated with him. In August, 1877, Mr. Chase married Elizabeth Withington, who bore him three children. His wife died in September, 1890.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Alexander L. Chew, Geneva, was born at New Orleans October 4, 1824, the seventh child of Beverly and Maria Theodora Chew. In 1840 he entered Hobart College to take the preparatory course, and in 1841 entered on the full course, leaving college in 1843 and returning home, where he did business until 1848. In 1849 he came here and entered into the hardware business with Phineas Prouty, which continued thirteen years. He then sold his interest in the concern and kept a private bank for two or three years. In 1864, in company with Mr. Prouty and Corydon Wheat, he bought the entire interest of the First National Bank and became its president, with Thomas Raines as cashier. The capital was then $50,000, but has now increased to $100,000, with a surplus of about $50,000. In 1849 Mr. Chew married Sarah A. Prouty, and they have seven children: four sons and three daughters.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Thomas Hillhouse Chew, a member of one of Geneva's oldest and most prominent families and identified with city banking all his life, was born in Geneva on May 26, 1857, the son of Alexander Lafayette and Sarah Augusta Chew. He was educated at Dr. Reed's School in Geneva and then entered St. John's School in Manlius, N. Y., now known as The Manlius School. Entering Hobart College he was graduated with the Class of 1876 with the degree of B. S. In 1877 he entered the employ of the First National Bank of Geneva of which his father was founder and president and which is now known as Geneva Trust Company. He was successively runner, bookkeeper, teller, cashier and upon the death of his father some 20 years ago became president, an office he still holds. The First National Bank was founded in 1863 and later becoming the Geneva Trust Company has had only two presidents, Mr. Chew's father and himself.

Mr. Chew has been active in city and county affairs for many years but has preferred to remain in the background and has held no political office. He was exceedingly active in Red Cross work during the World War and was chairman of the Geneva Chapter, American Red Cross. He has also been chairman of a number of local drives and was treasurer of the Geneva General Hospital Building Fund. He is a member of Sigma Phi Fraternity, the Society of the Genesee, the Genesee Valley Club of Rochester and the Geneva Country Club. He succeeded his father as warden of Trinity church and still holds this office. Mr. Chew has never married and has only one immediate relative, his brother, Phineas P. Chew of New York City.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Elijah A. Childs, Hopewell, was born in Hopewell, September 24, 1816, a son of Enos, who was a son of Lebbeus, a native of Conway, Mass., who came to Seneca in 1812. His wife was Sarah Childs, and they had three sons and five daughters. Enos Childs was born in Conway, Mass., in 1789, and when a young man came to Seneca. He married Dimmis Allis of Hopewell. Her father died when she was very young, and she was reared by her grandfather, Lucius Allis, a prominent man of his time, and once a member of the Legislature. Mr. Childs had three sons and two daughters. He was a successful businessman and a prominent farmer, owning 250 acres. He was a poormaster and school commissioner a number of years. Subject was educated in Canandaigua Academy and has always been a farmer, early taking charge of his father's business. In 1845 he married Mary A. Pollock, a native of Arcadia, Wayne county, born November 26, 1824. Her father, James Pollock, was a native of Scotland, and came to Wayne in 1816. His wife, Mary Riggs, was a native of New Jersey. Subject has three daughters: Dimmis A., wife of Lyman E. R. Rockwell, M. D., of Ameno; Sarah L., wife of Charles Post, of Seneca, she died November 28, 1892; and Mary E., who resides at home. Mr. Childs is a Republican and has been assessor nine years in succession, also poormaster. He is a member of Stanley Grange.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Chisholm, Colin D., Canandaigua, was born in Nova Scotia, August 5, 1842, and came to Ontario county in 1868, locating first at Victor, where he followed mining for plaster stone for a year.  He then came to Canandaigua, where he has ever since been a contractor for building and repairing sidewalk, putting in sewers and rain pipes, etc. In 1890 Mr. Chisholm was elected street superintendent, and re-elected in 1891.  He usually employs from eighteen to twenty men. Though a Republican Mr. Chisholm has never been an aspirant for political office, save the one he holds, and which he fills in an experienced and able manner.  The substantial stone sidewalks of the village have been almost entirely laid by Mr. Chisholm. He married in 1872 Nora Mahoney, of Victor, by whom he has four children:  Frederick E., Jennie May, Ada Belle and Colin Blaine.  They are members of the Catholic church here.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Church, E. Chapin, Canandaigua, was born in Antwerp, Jefferson county, August 15, 1848.  The boyhood of our subject was spent on the farm at Antwerp, where he received an education in the seminary.  When he was nineteen he went to New Hampshire where he learned the machinist's trade, when, his father dying, he returned to his home.  He spent two and one half years in New York in the mercantile business, and in the spring of 1873 came to Canandaigua, where he engaged in the insurance and real estate business, and is now the leading insurance man of the town.  He has always been prominently identified with the Republican party here and was president of the Young Men's Club in 1884-85.  In 1885 he was elected county treasurer by a majority of over 800 and in 1888 was re-elected, his term expiring January 1, 1892.  Mr. Church was president of the Mosher Hook & Ladder Company from 1876 to 1881, and a director of the Canandaigua Gaslight Company for the last five years.  He is also president of the Western Improvement Company of Dubuque, Ia.  He married November 18, 1875, Mary A., daughter of Captain George Chalmers of Oswego, and they have one son and one daughter, E. Raymond and Julia C.  Mr. Church is a supporter of the Congregational church of which his family are members, and he is also a member of Canandaigua Lodge F. & A.M., No. 264.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Church, Gillman, Geneva, was born in Lower Canada, June 24, 1826, and came with his parents to this country when six years old, where he was educated in the common schools. He was a farmer, and was twice married, first in November, 1847, to Electa Woodin, of Geneva, by whom he had two children:  Henrietta, who died in infancy and Warren B., who married Mary Soule, of Waterloo, and has two children, Roscoe A. and Kittie E.  Mrs. Church died in 1853, and Mr. Church married second, September 24, 1854, Mrs. Sarah J. Clice, of Phelps.  She was married first to George Clice on February 5, 1848. He died November 9, 1851.  Mr. Church's father, James, was born in Connecticut and came to this state in 1839. He married Ruth Bliss, and they had three children:  Eben D., Gillman and James C.  Mrs. Church's father, Edward McDowell, was born in Orange county, August 10, 1788, and came here with his parents when thirteen years old. He married Margaret Cook, of Phelps, and they had three children, two sons and a daughter:  Francis C., David and Sarah J. Mrs. Church's grandfather, James McDowell, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

C. M. Clark, Shortsville, was born at Ingleside, Steuben county, March 7, 1850. He received an academic education, after which he followed milling and mercantile transactions for ten years. Then he moved to New Haven, Conn., and engaged in the wholesale commission business. After one year he sold out and returned to New York State, locating at Shortsville in the lumber and planing mill industry. He has served as trustee of the corporation and school, and is now president of the village. Mr. Clark married Olive Cole of North Cohocton, and they have one son and a daughter.



From Naples Record 17 April 1875

In these biographical researches that run back more than a hundred years, the writer has from time to time collected these facts from members and friends of the Clark family, and to save in pleasing reminiscences these sketches that might otherwise be lost in oblivion. In the early history of the Colony of Connecticut, Daniel Clark of Scotch descent from Wales, Eng., settled in Saybrook, Conn. His son or brother migrated to Lebanon, Conn; his grandson, William, married Lydia Lamb, and migrated to Windsor, Mass. His children were William, the oldest; Joseph, who settled in Northampton, Mass.; Sally, who married Mr. Thompson, father of John Thompson, the Wall Street broker, and author of Thompson's Bank note Reporter; Abbey, who married Col. James Lee, the first white child born in Naples, and who died in Sherwood, Mich., at 77 years of age; John, Dennis, and Charles Lee, Lavinia, Lydia, Nathaniel, and Elijah. The youngest brother of Col. William Clark, Elijah, married Lucy Brown of Windsor, Mass.; his children were Elijah Jr., John S., Calvin, Rebecca, Lavina Lucy.

Elijah, Jr.
was Capt. of the Militia in 1812, and volunteered with a part of his Co.; he was taken prisoner at Sortie on Fort Erie, and confined as prisoner of war in Halifax a year and half, but was paroled and returned to Naples and died of the epidemic in 1814; six died out of the same family; he was buried in uniform with military honors. Lucy married Capt. Nathan Watkins. Rebecca married Paul Grimes. Lavina married Jason Goodrich. This brance of the family possessed good talents in instrumental and vocal music, and the dancers of that day, and the listeners to good songs, were always animated at the festive gatherings of the young folks. The brothers were excellent shots, and a squirrel's head at three hundred yards was in danger at every crack of the rifle. Upon one occasion Calvin had penetrated far into the gloomy woods over the Italy hills; near sunset his dog treed a large panther, and loading his rifle with the last ball he had, fired and brought the monster dead to the ground. In December of that year, Capt. Elijah Clark, Calvin Clark, Jonathan Pierce, and Otis Pierce of Middletown, in company, struck a bear track on the hill above Italy hollow and with their dogs followed him to Loon Lake, thence to Conesus Lake, back by the way of Hemlock lake, to Honeoye Lake, and over the Bristol hills to the head of Canandaigua Lake. The bear crossed the swamp to the Clark gully in Italy, and took shelter from his ruthless pursuers and after nine days of a weary tramp, he entered the recess of that dark ravine in hopes of finding repose, but the hunters were determined on their game although weary. The number had increased from four to nearly thirty fresh recruits; the boys ran out of the nearest homes to join the exciting chase. It was that that Bruin was surrounded by his foes, old hunters with their rifles; dogs were sent into the chasm, and soon the barking of dogs and the indignant growls of the bear were heard. It was at the mouth of the gully that Israel Mead was stationed; he had a habit of stammering that would be increased when excited to fear or anger; the bear made directly towards him, in his anxiety to escape from the dogs. Mead saw his danger and throwing up both hands yelled out at the top of his voice King's truce; that moment the bear had run over him, and poor Mead was rolling down the hill nearly dead with fear. The bear hard pressed, took up the swamp of the West river, and was treed over the line in Middlesex, where the hunters surrounded the tree, and at the word fire, given by Capt. Clark, he fell dead at the foot of the tree. He was a large brown bear, and weighed over five hundred pounds.

Col. William Clark, the eldest of the family married Miriam Bingham; their children were Submit, William, Lydia, Hannah, Miriam and Betsey. Submit married Col. Green and settled in Rushville. William married Fanny Metcalf and settled in Italy; he died in 1851, aged 81. Fanny, his wife, died in 1845 at 69 years. Their children were Nancy, Orissa, Bothera, William, J. Metcalf, Fanny, Aaron B., Erastus G., Submit, Solon, and Clarissa, wife of William Wykoff; those living are scattered over the west.

Hannah married Simeon Lyon, who died in December 1834, aged 64; she died on January 23rd, 1849, aged 73 years. Their children were Harriet, who married John W. Hinckley -- both are dead; Bronson K., who married (can't read) Wiley -- both are dead; Desdamona who married Josiah Porter, Esq. -- both are living here. Irvin, who married Roxana Tenney -- are dead; Angeline, who married Alfred Nichols, now of Martin, Mich. -- she died there in 1873; Betsey, who married Ira Deyo -- she died in Naples Nov. 13, 1874; Simeon C. married Julia Holcomb, both are living here; Martha J., who married Dr. Lester Sprague, an eminent physician -- he died in Naples in 1864.

Lydia married Josiah Bradish. Their children were John, Josiah, Luther, Riahl, Mrs. Jerusha Lyon, Mrs. Hannah Dean, and Mrs. Lydia N. Hannahs. Miriam married Abiather Chaffee. Their children were Harvey, Ephraim, Miriam and Cyrel. Betsey married Stephen Watkins -- both died in Grass Lake, Mich.; their children were Bingham, Loring, Ira, George, Joseph C., Stephen M., James and Betsey -- all living in and near Grass Lake.

Col. William Clark married for his second wife, Mary Warner, widow of Timothy Mower; the children of Timothy Mower were John, who was the first settler of Italy; Timothy, Betsey and Polly. John Mower married Judith Larned, widow of Samuel H. Torrey; Betsey married Daniel Wilder; his daughter was Mrs. John Wisewell of Rushville. The children of Col. Clark, by his second marriage, were Berthena married Gen. White, who migrated to Sylvania, Ohio, where he and his wife both died. Joseph was born in Windsor, Mass., in 1785, and came to Middletown, (now Naples), with his father's family at the age of six years; he learned his letters from Susannah Parrish who taught the first school in the new settlement. He was a Lieutenant in Capt. Elijah Clark's company and volunteered with him early in the war of 1812. He, with most of his company, was taken prisoner at the Sortie on Fort Erie and was taken to Halifax where he remained a year and a half.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Lawrence Clark, son of William and Mary Theresa (Schieffelin) Clark, was born in Geneva in 1845. He was educated at the Walnut Hill School and at Hobart College. In early manhood he went to New York City where he entered the wholesale drug house of Schieffelin & Co. and was associated with them for twenty years. In 1887 he returned to Geneva and since that time led a retired life in the old colonial mansion at the end of Main street. Mr. Clark never married. His death occurred Sept. 11, 1926.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Nelson W. Clark, Naples, was born in Naples September 14,1811, a son of Warren and Artamecia (Pomeroy) Clark of Berkshire MA, who came to Naples with his father, Major Benjamin Clark in 1791.  They built the first saw-mill and grist-mill in Naples, and Warren Clark bought the first stock of goods ever in the town.  Nelson is the only surviving member of his father's family, which consisted of five children.  He was educated at the common and select schools of Naples, has held several county offices, and has been side judge, deputy sheriff, justice of the peace and U. S. revenue collector and postmaster eight years and during the war.  He has practiced law in Ontario, Yates, Livingston, Monroe and Steuben counties.  He was colonel of an artillery regiment, comprising six companies of members from Ontario, Livingston and Steuben counties and has been a mechanic, merchant, farmer and real estate dealer, the latter in Chicago, Missouri, Iowa and New Jersey.  His grandfather, Benjamin, married his second wife in Naples.  Her name was Thankful Watkins and the wedding was the first one in the town.  Nelson W. lived a bachelor until sixty years old, then married (in 1871) Elizabeth B. Talcott of Bergen NY.  He has been one of the most active business men in the county, and is now enjoying his ripe age in overseeing his two grist-mills and one saw-mill, and other interests in Naples and vicinity and in the West.  He remembers when there were more Indians than white people in Naples, and the surrounding hills were alive with the wild deer, bears and wolves.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Rev. Orin Clark, D. D., rector of Trinity Church, died Feb. 24, 1828, in the 41st year of his age. He was professor of Systematic Theology in the Seminary connected with the old Geneva Academy and active and influential in transferring the Academy  into Geneva College, now known as Hobart College. About 1820 he was engaged in a controversy with Rev. Mr. Bacon of Waterloo, a Presbyterian minister, about baptism. The controversy called out a number of pamphlets, and made quite a stir in its day.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Walter A. Clark was born in Troy, N. Y., 1846. He established a business on his own account when he was but twenty-two years of age, commencing the manufacture of stoves in Troy in the firm of Phillips and Clark. The business was removed to Geneva in 1885 and became known as the Phillips & Clark Stove Co., with Mr. Clark as president and manager. Mr. Clark took a great interest in public affairs and served as supervisor of the town for a period of two years and one term as Member of Assembly. Mr. Clark died March 20, 1914.



From "Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography and Mythology, Volume 1." By Joseph Thomas. J.B. Lippincott company, 1915.

Clarke, John Mason, geologist, was born at Canandaigua, New York, April 15, 1857. He was educated at Amherst and Gottingen and held professorships in geology at several institutions. He was appointed assistant State geologist of New York in 1894, and State paleontologist in 1898. Has written much on geological subjects. [page 657]
Thanks to Martha Magill for this contribution.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

 
Cleggett, Benjamin F., Geneva, was born in Dutchess county, July 30, 1828, and came to Rochester with his parents when but a child.  In 1836 they went to Canada, where Mr. Cleggett was educated.  The family returned to Rochester in 1847.  Mr. Cleggett has nearly always followed the trade of barber, and has been a resident of Geneva thirty-five years.  He enlisted in the navy in 1864 and was honorably discharged in 1865, when Charles J. Folger was secretary of the treasury at Washington.  Mr. Cleggett was messenger there, returning home at the death of Mr. Folger.  He was married twice, first in Rochester on September 5, 1849, Frances Nell, whose brother was assistant editor of the North Star, under the management of Hon. Frederick Douglass.  They had eleven children, six of whom are living:  Benjamin F., Jr., who resides in Boston; Frannie J., who married Stephen F. Jasper of Boston; Mary, who married William F. Kinney of Geneva; Ira (residence not known), and Lucretia, who married John Jones of LeRoy, N.Y.; Mrs. Cleggett died March 27, 1875.  For his second wife, on November 27, 1877, he married Letitia A. Haley of Canandaigua, and they have had two daughters:  Alice L. and Laura B., who died in infancy.  Mr. Cleggett's father, David, was born in Maryland a slave.  He escaped and gained his liberty.  Mrs. Cleggett's father, Aldred Haley, was born in Martinsburg, Va., a slave.  He, too, escaped, but he returned, was recaptured, and again remanded to slavery for a short time.  He again came to Canandaigua and married Elizabeth Brooks, by whom he had seven children:  Emily, Letitia A., Alice J., Laura A., Charles A., and Helen L.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Clement, Maynard N., Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, Ontario county, October 12, 1856, a son of Isaac, a farmer of Bristol.  The grandfather, Garrett, came from Schoharie county among the first settlers. The early life of our subject was spent on the farm where he worked for seven years by the month.  His first education was in the common schools, and from there he came to Canandaigua Academy, after leaving which he taught school for three years.  In 1877 he entered the law office of Hon. Edwin Hicks, of Canandaigua, where he read law until admitted to practice at the bar in January, 1880. He first bought a law library and continued an office in Victor until the fall of the same year, when he removed the library to Canandaigua, where he has since conducted an office.  In November, 1887, he was elected on the Republican ticket to the office of district attorney, and during his term had three very important murder cases, all of which were convicted. First the People vs. John Kelly, second People vs. Frank Lamont, and People vs. Frank Fish.  In the latter case Mr. Clement was opposed to some of the most able counsel of the county.  He was re-elected in 1890 by a majority of about 1,200 leading his party ticket by about 200. His second term his most important case has been the People vs. Cameron, a Geneva murder trial. He was chairman of the Republican County Committee in 1885-86, and has always taken an active interest in the Republican party. Mr. Clement married in 1883 Clara Fitch, of Canandaigua, and they have five children:  Clara, Tony, Emory, Fitch, Holden Metcalf, Louise Field and Mary Florence.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Irving W. Coates, Hopewell, the subject of this sketch, was born in the town of Manchester, Ontario county, November 14, 1836. He is the second son of Captain James T. J. Coates, late of the town of Hopewell, in the same county. His grandfather, James Coates, was a native of New London, Conn. When quite a young man he came to Stephentown, Rensselaer county, and married Miss Penelope Northrup, the daughter of the Rev. Gideon Northrup, an eloquent divine, who at that time resided in the eastern portion of the State. James Coates was one of the pioneers of settlement at what is now known as Varysburg, Wyoming county. He, in common with many others, carved out homes in the dense wilderness and endured all the hardships and dangers incident to such a life. In the war of 1812, which so soon followed the white settlement of Western New York, he was employed as a teamster to transport arms, ammunition and supplies for the use of the army of General Stephen Van Rensselaer, then gathering at Lewiston on the Niagara for a descent upon Canada. He would never accept any pay for his services, declaring that it was the duty of every good citizen to uphold the honor of his country in the hour of its need and danger. He had much intercourse with the Indians during the early days of settlement, and knew personally Red Jacket Farmer's Brother, Young King, Seneca White, and other noted chiefs of the Six Nations, who were frequent guests at his house. In 1817 he exchanged his property at Varysburg for a fine farm near Clifton Springs in the town of Manchester, where he died at the advanced age of eighty-six years, honored and respected. Capt. James T. J. Coates, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born at Stephenstown, Rensselaer county, in 1804, and removed at a tender age with his father's family to their new home amid the hemlock forests of the Holland Purchase. On arriving at man's estate he was for many years a successful farmer of the town of Manchester, and in 1850 removed to the adjoining town of Hopewell, in the same county, purchasing the fine homestead farm now owned and occupied by his son, Irving W., where he resided until his death, July 22, 1889, aged eighty-six years. His estimable wife, whose maiden name was Minerva Whitney, daughter of Jonas Whitney, a worthy pioneer of the town of Hopewell, survived him but about a year, her death occurring October 31, 1890. Captain Coates was a most worthy citizen, an upright, honorable man in all his dealings and was quite successful in business. He held several offices of trust given him unsolicited by his fellow citizens, and discharged the duties of them always to his credit. He was an active officer in the early militia organizations of Ontario county, and received the commissions of first lieutenant and captain from Gov. De Witt Clinton. For a brief period we believe he was on the staff of Col. Lester Phelps of Canandaigua, who commanded the old One Hundred and Eleventh Regiment N. Y. S. Militia, and who was a warm personal friend of his. Irving W. Coates, in common with most farmers sons, received his first rudiments of education at the district school, supplemented by a course at the old Chemung Classical School at Palmyra, Wayne county, where he graduated, we believe, in 1855 with honor, having been selected to deliver the valedictory address at the close of the term. He afterwards took a special course in historical and scientific studies under private tutors. He has been a frequent contributor to many prominent papers, and enjoys the reputation of being a ready, graphic writer, and a close student of men and events. He has been for several years an earnest student of our early Indian history, and his recent contribution to the columns of the Ontario County Times on the "Castle of Onagbee" and "In the Footprints of Denonville," stamps him as an accomplished Indianologist, and a writer whose graceful pen is able to lend great interest and charm to the subjects of which he treats. Mr. Coates has been twice married, his first wife, a most estimable lady, was Miss Josephine R. Short of Manchester, by whom he had left two children: Nelson, since deceased, and Heman J., who lives at the old homestead. His second wife was Mrs. Irene M. Hoes, a worthy lady, daughter of Harvey King, an old and honored resident of Manchester, and a member of one of the pioneer families of that town. Mrs. King died March 5, 1873. Mr. Coates has one brother, James F. Coates, an esteemed citizen of Cassopolis, Cass county, Mich., and one sister, Mrs. Mary A. Parsons of Clifton Springs.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Cobb, Russell B., Phelps, only child of Nahum and Emeline (Bennett) Cobb, was born in Phelps, September 10, 1841.  Nahum, the father, was born in Massachusetts.  His father, George, moving to this State when his son was a boy.  The great-grandfather of Russell B. was also named George Cobb.  He was a soldier in the Revolutionary army, and his ancestors were Cape Cod people.  Russell B. married, in January, 1862, Mary, daughter of Oliver and Lucy (Howard) Gerow, of Phelps, and they have two children:  George Gerow and Lula.  Mr. Cobb is one of the representative citizens of the town.  He has served as road commissioner for the past nine years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Cochran, James, Bristol, was born in County Down, Ireland, July 17, 1826, one of nine children of James and Ann (McClure) Cochran, natives of County Down, Ireland, where James Cochran, sr., died.  Mrs. Cochran came to America, and died in the town of Canandaigua in 1855.  The subject was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of Ireland.  At the age of twenty-two he came to America, and starting in life working by the month, is today one of the leading farmers of Bristol.  In 1870 he came to Bristol and purchased a farm of 118 acres, where he has since resided. In 1851 he married in Vermont, Bridget Denver, a native of County Down, Ireland, and daughter of William and Margaret (McMillen) Denver. Mr. Cochran and wife have had the following children:  John, a farmer of Bristol, who married Mary A. Gracy, by whom he had nine children:  William (deceased); his wife was Ann Murphy, of Ireland, by whom he had three children: Nettie (deceased), Margaret, wife of James Bohon.  She died leaving one child, Mary, who resides with her grandparents. Mr. Cochran has always been a Republican.  Mrs. Cochran is a member of the Catholic church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Codding, Myron Hart, West Bloomfield, was born in Bristol, February 29, 1837. His great-grandfather, George, came from Dighton, Mass., and was one of the first settlers in Bristol.  The grandfather, William Thayer Codding, was twelve years of age when his father came to Bristol.  He married successively two sisters, by whom he had five sons and five daughters, of whom William Grover Codding, the father of Myron H., was the oldest, and was born in 1803. He was a farmer and spent his life in Bristol.  In 1830 he married Orpha Gillett, of Connecticut ancestry.  She died in 1850 and he in 1871. Myron H. obtained his early education at the district schools. When twenty-two years of age he engaged in farming in Illinois, but after five years returned to Bristol and came to this town in 1865, and on Christmas Day of that year married Adelaide, daughter of Burton Ham.  Her grandfather came from New Hampshire and her grandmother from Massachusetts, and settled in East Bloomfield in an early day.  Mr. And Mrs. Codding have five children: Burton Ham, William Grover, Ellen Emeline, Moses F. H., and Edith G.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John S. Coe
, Canandaigua.  Mr. Coe is of English origin.  His ancestor in America was Robert Coe, born in the county of Suffolk, Eng., who together with his wife, Anna, and three sons, John, Robert, and Benjamin, sailed from Ipswich Eng., in the ship Francis, John Cutting, master, April 10 1634; landed in Boston in the June following, and first settled in Watertown near Boston and subsequently settled in Wethersfield county Conn.  His branch of the family settled at what is called South Farms, near Middletown, Conn., long before the Revolutionary War; and the old homestead bought by his great-grandfather, Jesse Coe, when Connecticut was a colony, is still owned in the family.  His grandfather, Jesse Coe, emigrated to Mount Washington, Berkshire county, Mass., early and became a large landholder there, where his father, William W. Coe, was born.  He married Catharine Vosburg of Columbia county in this State, and moved to Verona, Oneida county, where Mr. Coe was born, and while very young his parents moved to Galen, Wayne county, where his father died when he was only six and one half years old, at which time he was thrown upon his own resources.  He came to Phelps in his early teens and partially fitted for college at the Phelps Union and Classical School under the tuition of that celebrated teacher, Prof. Lewis Peck, and finished his preparatory course at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima and subsequently graduated at Union College and also the Albany Law School.  He was at one time the principal of the Clyde High School and the Phelps Union and Classical School.  He raised and commanded as captain, Company B, One Hundred and Eleventh Regt. NYS Vols. in the late Rebellion.  In 1865 he went to Canandaigua and studied in the law office of Messrs. Lapham & Adams, and has practiced his profession in Canandaigua ever since.  He married Miss Addie A. Titus of Phelps in 1868 by whom he has one daughter, Mabel C., the wife of Dr. Frederick E. McClellan, also of Canandaigua.  Mr. Coe is now serving his third term as a justice of the peace, each time being elected by large majorities.  He is thoroughly devoted to his business and is noted for his energy and perseverance, and is one of the best known men in Ontario county.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;


Schuyler P. Coe, Geneva, son of John D. and Sophia (Stone) Coe, was born October 2, 1832, in Romulus. He received a common school education and in 1852 went to Chicago as salesman in a wholesale house, remaining nine years. September 17, 1861, he enlisted in Battery B, First Illinois Artillery, in which he was corporal. July 12, 1864, Battery B was consolidated with Battery A, in which he acted as lieutenant ten days. He was in Andersonville prison sixty days. After the war he bought a farm in Seneca county and engaged in farming. He was salesman for R. G. Chase & Co. in 1871, and had an office in Baltimore one year, and Toledo, O., five years. In 1879 he began dealing in scrap iron, which he has since carried on. During the war he was in many battles and several skirmishes, among them being Belmont, November 7, 1861; Fort Donelson, February 13-15, 1862; Shiloh, April 6-7; Siege of Vicksburg, May and June; Chattanooga, November 24-25; Resaca, May 13-15, 1864; Dallas, May 26-31; Kenesaw Mountain, June, 1864; Peach Tree Creek, July 20; Bald Hill, July 22, and was captured there and held prisoner until September 19, 1964. His father was Judge John D. Coe, who was treasurer of the Seneca County Agricultural Society forty years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Coe, William W., Canandaigua, was born in Galen, Wayne county, February 28, 1841, a son of William W., a farmer of that town, and a native of Berkshire county, Mass. where he was born April 30, 1810.  He moved into New York State while a young man and located in Galen, where he followed farming until his death, November 9, 1840.  He married Catherine Vosburgh (who survives him, aged eight-three years), and five children, four of whom still live.  William W. spent his early life in the town of his birth.  He was educated in Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, and his first occupation was as clerk in J. C. Atkinís grocery at Clyde.  He was with him three years, then spent three years with P. G. Dennison in his dry good store.  January 1, 1862, Mr. Coe came to Canandaigua and engaged in the insurance business, which has been very successful by dint of hard work, and careful attention.  He represented three of the best companies in the country in fire insurance, besides his life and accident company.  He is also notary public and agent for steamship tickets.  Mr. Coe married March 23, 1865, Emma P. Clarke, of Clyde, who lived but five months.  He married second in November, 1869, Caroline, daughter of Albert Sheldon, the merchant, and they have two children: Iva May, and Charles Albert, now in his fifteenth year.  Mr. Coe is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294, of which he is a junior deacon.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

D. Merritt Cole, Gorham, was born in Gorham January 3, 1843, a son of George W., a son of Willard, who was a native of Massachusetts, and in 1820 came to Gorham. George W. was born in Massachusetts in 1814 and when a boy came to Gorham. His wife was Sarah Ann White, also a native of Massachusetts and they had two sons and one daughter: Geo. W., jr., D. Merritt and Mary A., all living. G. W. Cole purchased the farm of 106 acres which D. Merritt now owns. George W. died February 1, 1892, and his wife May 1, 1886. D. Merritt was educated in the common schools and in Palmyra Academy. January 15, 1868, he married Rachel E. Robinson, a native of Phelps, born January 19, 1849, a daughter of Asa H. and Alvina (Doane) Robinson, early settlers of Phelps. In 1870 they moved to Michigan where Mrs. Robinson died May 8, 1881. Mr. Robinson still resides there. Subject and wife have six children: Robinson A., Miner G., Henry T., Ernest M., Bertha A. and Mary E., all living. Mr. Cole is a Republican.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George W. Cole
, Gorham, was born in Gorham September 7, 1840, a son of George W. Cole.  He was educated in the common schools and Rushville High School.  In 1863 he married Caroline P. Allen of South Dansville, who died in 1865, and in 1867 Mr. Cole married Caroline P. Foster by whom he has two children.  A. Luella, now Mrs. Chester Olmstead of East Bloomfield, and Vallenda C.  Mr. Cole is a farmer and a breeder of Jersey cattle, and at present is agent for all papers and magazines published in the United States and in foreign countries.  He is a Republican and a member of the Reed's Corners Grange.  He was president of the Gorham Agricultural Society in 1887-88 and '89, also vice-president of same society four years and overseer of the domestic department seven years.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Peter R. Cole, treasurer of Hobart College, was born at Rensselaerville, Albany county, in 1869, and was educated at the Rensselaerville Academy. Following his graduation from that institution he took an extended course in a business college, after which he taught school in Albany county. In the fall of 1885, he came to Geneva and took a position with Palmer & Rouse, one of the city's leading business houses. Mr. B. B. Rouse eventually purchased Mr. Palmer's share of the business and for many years Mr. Cole continued with Mr. Rouse, assisting in organizing the Geneva Coal Company and the Ontario Coal Company, later becoming general manager of that company. In 1896 Mr. Cole was appointed a member of the Board of Health, serving for two years; in 1896 he became the first city clerk of Geneva and served for four years. For many years he played an important part in Republican politics and served the party in various capacities. In 1909 he was elected county treasurer and served nine years, following which he became associated with the Farmers and Mechanics Bank in the capacity of president. This association continued for about a year until the bank merged with the Trust Company following which Mr. Cole became Hobart College treasurer in 1919, a position which he still holds. Mr. Cole is a Mason and an Elk and is a vestryman at St. Peter's church, in addition to numerous other public interests. In Dec. 1906, he married Miss Bertha L. Barth, who died recently. His home is 202 Hamilton street.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. James C. Collie, another well-known Geneva physician, was born in Franklinville, Cattaraugus County, N. Y., 1866. He was educated in the Cattaraugus Academy and at the Long Island College Hospital, where he graduated in 1889. At first he began practice in New York City but came to Geneva in 1902, where he quickly established a lucrative practice. Dr. Collie married in 1898, Miss Myrtle Balch of Minnesota. He died July 28, 1924.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Dr. Peter Collier, director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station near Geneva, was elected to his present office in 1887, and it is of undoubted interest to the farmer of Ontario county to know something of the person who occupies this highly responsible position. Peter Collier was born at Chittenango, Madison county, August 17, 1835, and was the son of Jacob and Elizabeth Mary Collier, his father, grand and great-grandfather being practical farmers of New York State. He therefore early became familiar with farm work, and was educated in the common schools and the academic institution of his native home called the "Polytechny." From this school he graduated, and afterward entered Yale College, from which he graduated in 1861. After graduation he entered the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale College where he remained as a private student for six years, and at the time had charge of certain classes in this school as instructor. In 1867 he became professor of chemistry in the University of Vermont, at Burlington, and later was chosen dean of the medical faculty of this university. In 1872 he was appointed secretary of the newly created Board of Agricultural and Mining in Vermont, and in connection with the work of this board, Dr. Collier established the first series of Farmers' Institutes ever held in the United States. In 1873 he was appointed by President Grant as one of the six scientific commissioners to represent the United States at the World's Exposition at Vienna, and upon his return reported upon the subject of commercial fertilizers as shown at this exposition. In 1877 Dr. Collier left Vermont and went into the agricultural department at Washington, D. C., having charge of the chemical division. He continued there until 1877, when he was elected to succeed Dr. Sturtevant as director of the Experiment Station near the village of Geneva.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Cholett Collins, East Bloomfield, a native of East Bloomfield, was born September 22, 1830. He is a son of Guy, whose father, Cyprian, was a native of Connecticut, who came early to East Bloomfield, where he died. He was a farmer and contractor of the building of the Erie canal. Guy was born in East Bloomfield in 1804, and married Maria Ellis, a native of Schoharie county, by whom he had four sons and a daughter. Mr. Collins is a prominent man of his town. He owned 225 acres of land, and for many years was an extensive dealer in stock and wool. In politics he was a Whig, but is now a Democrat. He was supervisor two years and assessor several years. Mr. Collins now resides with subject at the age of eighty-nine years. Cholett Collins was reared on a farm and received an academic education. He is a farmer and owns 110 acres of land. He makes a specialty of breeding American Merino sheep, and is now serving his second term as vice-president of the American Merino Sheep Association. Mr. Collins has been twice married, first in 1856, to Lucinda B. Brace, by whom he had two daughters: Elizabeth and Mary. His second wife was Anna V. McUmber, to whom he was married in 1871. Mr. Collins is a Democrat, and has been supervisor three years. He and family attend the Presbyterian church of East Bloomfield.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George S. Collins, Victor, was born in Mendon, Monroe county, February 26, 1821. He was educated in the district school of that place, and came with his parents to Victor in the year of 1853, and has always been a farmer. November 20, 1856, he married Mariette, daughter of Jesse and Abigal Richards, of Newark, Wayne county, and they have four children: Nellie L., who married Eugene L. Thompson, station agent at Fishers; Adelbert S., Arthur E. and A. May; Carrie B. Collins, deceased. The sons run the home farm, and the youngest daughter is at school. Mr. Collins's father, John, was born at Rutland, Conn., October 10, 1793, and they had five children: Merlin, John, Chloe, George S., and Thomas B. His grandfather, John Collins, was in the battle of Bennington in the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Collins's father, Jesse Richards, was born in Hillsdale, Columbia county, and married Abigail Sheldon, of Albany county, and they had nine children: German, John S., Edward, George H. and Warren (a half brother), Paulina, Caroline, Elvira, Catherine and Mariette. Mr. Collins's father was in the War of 1812. The family are members of the Universalist church of Victor.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Louis D. Collins, who was head of the Collins Iron Works, was the son of Chauncey Brooks Collins, was born in Rose Valley, Wayne County, in 1852. He was educated in the High Schools and for seventeen years he engaged in the wholesale drug business in New York City, after which he removed to Ontario County and lived in retirement from business activity. In 1897 he took charge of New York Central Iron Works and ten years later incorporated a company of his own called the Collins Iron Works. When this ceased to operate Mr. Collins again lived in retirement at his residence on Lochland Road and after the death of his wife moved into apartments downtown, where he continues to reside.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Colmey, John, Canandaigua, was born in Stillwater, Saratoga county, August 2, 1858, and when very young moved with his parents to Victor.  He attended Victor Union School, after leaving which he taught school for several terms, and in 1877 went into the law office of E. L. Morse and H. O. Chesebro at Canandaigua, where he read law and was admitted to the bar in October, 1881.  He acted as clerk for Mr. Morse while he was in New York city for one year, and the next year opened a law office for himself.  The same year he was elected on the Democratic ticket justice of peace, and at the expiration of his term in 1887 he was re-elected without opposition.  In 1889 he was elected supervisor, and re-elected the next year by an increased majority.  January 19, 1892, he was appointed by Governor Flower to the office of surrogate of Ontario county, to fill the vacancy by the death of A. C. Armstrong.  In 1886 Mr. Colmey was justice of sessions for the county.  He has been secretary of the Democratic committee several years and is now chairman.  He married in August, 1889, Mary B. Widman, of Canandaigua, and they had two sons, Augustine and John.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Samuel Colt was a brother of Joseph Colt, an early merchant at Canandaigua. Samuel was, perhaps, the earliest very large merchant at Geneva; Town Clerk in 1796-7 and Supervisor in 1799. In 1800 he had a distillery. He was one of the incorporators of Geneva Academy. He finally removed to New York and while at Geneva attending a college commencement he suddenly died at the Geneva Hotel. He owned considerable real estate in Geneva including a tract familiarly known as Colt's Meadow, situated from Castle street northwards. Washington street east of Main street is yet frequently called Colt's Hill, his store being on the south east corner and his residence adjoining on Main street.



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