"B" to "Beal" Surname Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Babb, Ira P., West Bloomfield, was born in Livonia, Livingston county, July 28m, 1825.   His parents, Hosea and Polly (Witherill) Babb, came early in the century, he from Massachusetts and she from Vermont, to Livonia. His father died in West Bloomfield in 1882, aged nearly eighty-five years. Ira P., when eleven years of age, worked on a farm and then four years in Lima at a trade, carpentering and wagon making. He came to West Bloomfield and settled at Factory Hollow nearly forty years ago, engaged principally in building houses. In 1848 he married Louisa A. Matteson of Minden.  They had six children of whom these survive:  Araminda (Mrs. Skellinger of Honeoye Falls); Jennie (Mrs. Tack of Batavia); William A., at home; and Frank E., a house builder in New York and a graduate from Cooper Union, in architecture.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Babbitt, Gorham, was born in Gorham, October 23, 1841, a son of Avijah, a son of Enos, who was a native of Massachusetts. The latter was a sailor, and when a young man came and settled in Scipio. He married Margaret Mosher and had seven sons and one daughter. In 1817 he settled upon a farm in Gorham, where he died in 1855. Mrs. Babbitt died in 1830. Avijah was born in Scipio in 1814, and married Louisa Calf, by whom he had one child, Charles. The latter was educated in the common schools, and May 25, 1870, he married Hannah Francisco, a native of Canada, born March 31, 1850. Her parents were Henry and Mary (Miller) Francisco, who had five sons and three daughters. Mr. Francisco was a native of Amsterdam, and died in Gorham in 1871. His wife died in 1865. The father of Henry was John Francisco, an early settler of Middlesex, Yates county. Subject and wife have had three children: C. Allen, who married Maud Cook of Gorham, and resides on the old homestead; Henry A. and Annie. Mr. Babbitt is a Republican, and he and his family are members of the Presbyterian church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George L. Bachman, Geneva, was born in Fayette, Seneca county, October 7, 1841, but when he was five years old his parents went West. He was educated in the academic and common schools, and read law at Adrian, Mich., in the office of Beecher & Howell for two years, being admitted upon examination in open court in 1863. Mr. Bachman practiced in Adrian form 1863 to 1876, when failing health compelled him to come East for vacation and rest with an intention at that time, however, of again returning to Michigan to practice. Later on he opened an office in Geneva and soon established a profitable clientage, and is now regarded as one of the prominent residents of the county. While a resident of Adrian, Mr. Bachman was an active worker in politics, and was a member of the State Democratic Committee, also chairman of the county committee; but in Ontario county he has been content to drop active politics and devote his time solely to professional work. Mr. Bachman is one of a few Ontario county lawyers who are members of the State Bar Association. In 1866 Mr. Bachman married Maria Simms, by whom he has had four children, two of whom are living.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Jacob and Joseph Backenstose were brothers and came to Geneva in the earliest years, and were the pioneer tailors of the Genesee Country. Time was when to wear a coat from their press board marked the wearer as an aristocrat. The late John Backenstose, for many years a prominent merchant of Geneva, was a son of Jacob.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Dwight B. Backenstose, Geneva, son of Frederick T. and Leah (Kipp) Backenstose, was born in Benton, Yates county, December 24, 1846. He attended the public schools of Geneva, and in 1868 graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and has practiced his profession here since that time. He is one of the leading lawyers of Ontario county, and was elected member of assembly in 1877. He is a Republican, and takes an active part in political affairs. In 1876 he married Lillie C., daughter of Arthur W. Foote, of Brooklyn, N. Y.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Orrin Stebbins Bacon, Canandaigua, was born at Academy (town of Canandaigua), March 29, 1837, a son of Hiram Bacon, a Free Will Baptist minister, and a native of Pennsylvania born in 1809. He had five children all now living: Rev. John S. Bacon, of Corning; Roxina L., widow of John Beardsley, of Schuyler county; Eliza D., wife of Spencer Horton, of Penn Yan; Daniel R., a farmer of Pulteney, Steuben county; and Orrin S. Hiram Bacon came to this section in 1828 and followed his profession until his death, November 13, 1886. Mrs. Bacon died in Gorham aged eighty-eight years. When Orrin S. was very young his parents moved to Potter, Yates county, where he lived about eleven years and then went to Gorham. Orrin S. was educated in the common schools and spent three winters at Dundee Academy. From there, at the age of seventeen he taught school one winter in Jerusalem, Yates county. In 1855 he went to Victor where he followed farming one year, and then worked at the carpenter and joiner's trade one year. For twenty-three years he conducted a meat market, also dealt in real estate, etc. During the most of this time he held many of the minor town offices, and in 1879 he was nominated on the Republican ticket for sheriff and elected by a majority of 866 over Milton Staffor, of Victor. At the expiration of his term in 1883 he was appointed deputy revenue collector under Henry S. Pierce, and held this office four years. April, 1887, he was employed by McKechnie & Co. as financial manager, in their bank in Canandaigua, an office which he has ever since held. He is one of the directors for the Canandaigua Lake Steamboat Co., and a member of Victor Lodge, F. & A. M. He married, September 14, 1850, Harriet E. Simmons, of Victor, and they have had five children: Lillian M., wife of George M. Dunlop, a silk manufacturer of Spring Valley, Rockland county; Orrin S. Bacon, jr., connected in business with his father; Albert S., a Presbyterian minister of Niagara Falls; Lizzie, wife of Edward W. Simmons, of Canandaigua, and Jennie O.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Franklin Bailey, East Bloomfield, a native of East Bloomfield, born March 25, 1812, is a son of Zadock, a son of William, a native of Leeds, England, who with three brothers came to Newport, R. I., and there owned a large tract of land where the city of Newport now stands. William Bailey afterwards went to Providence, where he died. He had three sons and a daughter, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Zadock was born in Providence, R. I., in 1777, reared in Sheffield, Mass., by Rev. Judson and in 1793 came to East Bloomfield. He married Hannah Merrills, a native of Gorham, Litchfield county, Conn., and a daughter of Sylvester Merrills. Mr. Bailey and wife had three daughters and a son. His death occurred in 1776. Franklin was educated in East Bloomfield school, and at the age of twelve years he started in life for himself working on a farm. After a short time he began working in a hotel at Lima, and remained three years, when he went to Chicago and engaged as stage driver from Niles, Mich., to Chicago for three years, and then returned to East Bloomfield. Soon after he located at Albany and formed a partnership with Hiram Brunley, Josh Maxwell & Co., and for five years engaged in transportation on what was known as the Buffalo & Ohio Line. Then for two years he ran a packet boat from Schenectady to Utica, and finally became general passenger agent for the New York Central and Great Western and Michigan Central Railroads, in which capacity he acted for twenty-eight years. In 1865 he purchased 200 acres of land in East Bloomfield, and has here since resided. He has increased his original purchase to 352 acres, and many many improvements, so that he now owns one of the finest farms in the State. Mr. Bailey is a Democrat and an active politician. He has been twice married, first in 1844 to Elizabeth S. Reston, a native of Leeds, England, and daughter of John and Elizabeth Reston, of Leeds, who came to Poughkeepsie, where for nine years, Mr. Reston was professor of languages. He afterwards went to Albany and there engaged as a teacher. He died in 1845, and his wife in 1855. Mrs. Bailey died April 25, 1882, at the age of sixty-eight years. In 1889 Mr. Bailey married second, Mrs. Caroline T. Linkfield Carroll, a native of Oneida county, and a daughter of Edward and Sophronia (Husted) Linkfield, the former a native of Rutland, Vt., and the latter of Oneida county. Mr. Bailey was one of the organizers, and for many years was warden of the Episcopal church of East Bloomfield. He was one of three men who contributed very largely to the building of the church, and also one of the building committee. Mrs. Bailey was the widow of Gen. K. Carroll, by whom she had four daughters. Mr. Carroll was an attorney of Camden, N. Y., who was in 1872 a member of the Assembly. His children are: Ada E., wife of Frederick Wager, an attorney of Rome; Theressa, wife of Arthur C. Woodruff, an attorney of Camden; Genevieve, wife of Prof. Parsell, of Clinton Liberal Institute. Mrs. Parsell studied vocal music in Paris, and is now a teacher in the institute; and Grace K., an expert stenographer, who is engaged in teaching at Fort Plain.



From "History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Michigan, Volume 1." Compiled by William A. Whitney and Richard Illenden Bonner. W. Sterns, 1879.

NORTON BAKER was born in Manchester, Ontario county, New York, December 9th, 1802. His father, Joseph M. Baker, was born in Massachusetts, February 19th, 1780, but soon after, his parents moved to Rutland, Vermont. He lived in Rutland until he was about nineteen years old, when he went to Ontario county, New York, and soon after purchased a new farm in what was then the town of Farmington. He lived there until the spring of 1833, when he emigrated to Michigan, and finally purchased land from the government, in the town of Rome, this county, where he settled. He cleared the farm and lived upon it until the last few years of his life, and died in Rome, May 27th, 1872. About the year 1800, he married Miss Sally Cruthers, of Phelps, Ontario county, New York, by whom he had eleven children, six sons and five daughters, Norton being the oldest. Mrs. Sally Baker was born in Half Moon, New York, in 1778, and died in Rome, this county, September 15th, 1851. Norton Baker never had much school advantages, his father being a pioneer in Ontario county, New York, where schools were very "few and far between" in those days. He spent most of his time on his father's farm and in a distillery, until he was about twenty-eight years old. He came to Michigan in the spring of 1833, with his father, and took up the w. 1/2 of the s. w. 1/4, and e. part of the s. w. frac'l 1/4 of section 7 in Adrian, (then Logan,) where he still resides. He has cleared one hundred and fifty acres of land, and it is now all under a good state of cultivation. He has erected a good frame house, has a good orchard and all kinds of fruit, with barns, sheds &c. Of course the selection of the land was made in the dense forest, but he had sagacity and experience enough to make an excellent choice. Wolf Creek, a fine little stream of water, passes through the farm from north to south, and its sloping banks afford a splendid pasturage. Mr. Baker has never been an office seeker, but has been elected highway commissioner for sixteen years, and has been elected justice of the peace two different times. September 12th, 1830, he married Miss Almeda Howland, daughter of Jonathan and Mary Howland, of Manchester, Ontario county, New York, by whom he has had ten children, as follows: Sarah M., born in Manchester, New York, July 10th 1831, now the wife of Dr. Willard Perkins, of Franklin, this county; Isaac H., born in Manchester, New York, September 20th, 1833, died in Adrian, April 3d, 1852; Ellen L., born in Adrian, October 2d, 1835, now the wife of George Gambee of Adrian; Lois A., born in Adrian, October 24th, 1837, died March 12th, 1852; Mary E., born in Adrian, October 23d, 1839, now the wife of George Hunt, of Rome, this county; Roxanna I., born in Adrian, June 8th, 1841, died April 2d, 1852; Lewis O, born in Adrian, February 18th, 1844, a farmer and works the home farm. Frank I., born in Adrian, October 29th, 1845, died June 2d, 1862; Almeda A., born in Adrian, January 3d, 1848, died February 16th, 1852; Ava E., born in Adrian, October 25th, 1854, at home. Mrs. Almeda Raker was born December 6th, 1812, and came to Michigan with her husband in 1833. Her father was born in Adams, Massachusetts, in 1789, and was a pioneer of Ontario county, New York. He came to Michigan in 1846, and purchased a farm in Adrian township, where he died in 1871. Her mother was born in Gloucester, Rhode Island, in 1786, and died in Adrian, in September, 1846. [page 425}

Thanks to Martha McGill for contributing this biography.



 From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Baldwin, Charles H., Canandaigua, was born in Sanford, Dutchess county, October 2, 1853, and was educated in the common schools and Pelham Institute at Poughkeepsie, and has since been engaged in farming.  In 1885 he came to Ontario county, where he remained but a short time when he moved into Yates county and bought a farm, engaging in the cultivation of grapes, from which he has raised for over two years over fifteen tons per year. He also leased a farm adjoining, from which he raised about the same quantity.  Mr. Baldwin has been for the last four years a dealer in coal, and in 1892 opened a yard and office in Canandaigua, where he is prepared to furnish any quantity the trade demands.  Mr. Baldwin married in 1874 Frances, daughter of Merritt Mallory, a farmer groceryman of this town, and they have four children: Charles I., George E., Willis H., and Franklin S.  Mr. And Mrs. Baldwin are members of the Vine Valley M.E. church, of which he is trustee.  He is also a member of Canandaigua Lodge, No. 294, F. & A. M.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

George Baldwin, Gorham, was born in Italy, Yates county, September 10, 1825, a son of Daniel, who was a son of Jacob Baldwin, a native of Boston, Mass. The latter in youth was apprenticed to a tanner and currier. Not liking the business, at sixteen he enlisted in the Revolutionary War, where he rose to the rank of captain. In an early day Mr. Baldwin came to Saratoga county, and there married Hannah, daughter of Lifelet Hull, and had three sons and four daughters, Daniel being the eldest son. In 1804 he came to Benton, Yates county, and settled on a farm, which has been in the family ever since. Here he lived and died. Daniel was born May 3, 1792, in Saratoga county. He married Annie Wilson, a native of Benton, by whom he had two sons and two daughters. Mr. Baldwin was in the War of 1812. He died in Italy, Yates county, in 1849, and his wife in 1852. George Baldwin married, February 20, 1850, Mary Taylor, of Italy, born May 5, 1821. Mr. Baldwin has always been a farmer, and since 1866 has resided in Gorham. He is a Republican, and has been assessor nine years, and has held other town offices. The parents of Mrs. Baldwin were Stephen Taylor, a native of Benton, born 1797, and Electa Hewitt, a native of Oppenheim, born 1802. They had six children. He died in Allegany county, December 11, 1858, and his wife January 20, 1888. The father of Electa Hewitt was Randal Hewitt, who, during the Revolutionary War, was captured by the Indians.



From Victor Herald Newspaper 6 July 1895

Memorial Held at St. Paul's Universalist Church, Victor, N. Y. - Charles Ball was born July 19th, 1812, in Owego, Tioga Co., N. Y. He was the sixth son of William Ball and Phebe Bement, his wife, both of Stockbridge, Mass. The family moved to Victor in 1820. The boy, Charles, then eight years old, was sent to the district schools of the town which offered meager facilities for education compared with those of today. But, he plodded along industriously, and in early manhood was fitted to commence the study of medicine with his brother, Dr. William Ball, then, and for many years afterward, a practitioner in Victor. The Medical College at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., N. Y., was at that time attracting most of the medical students from this vicinity and Charles Ball was a member of the class which graduated therefrom in February, 1836; returning here, he entered upon his life work among us. He married Ann W. Page, October 12, 1845, and died August 30, 1880.



From Phelps Citizen 11 February 1915

Bannister Family

The Citizen recorded the passing away of Dr. Thaddeus Oaks Bannister at his home in Odell, Ill., January 16, 1915, aged 81 years. Dr. Bannister enjoyed our sketches of Phelps history and families. His ancestors were connected with Phelps from its earliest days. He resided in Phelps 1857-1862, when he entered the army as surgeon, serving from Phelps. His father was Augustus C. Bannister, grandfather Theodore Bannister, and great-grandfather, Captain Lemuel Bannister. Captain Lemuel Bannister was born in Brookfield, Mass., in 1748. He was in the prime of his life during the stirring times of the American revolution. Dr. Bannister was born in Marengo, where his father removed from Phelps. The father died in 1876, and his mother died in 1888. aged 77 years. The burial place of the family is in Joslyn Cemetery. The mother was a daughter of Frederick VanDemark, who died well along in years, in our earliest memory.

Captain Lemuel Bannister was a strong man, and in early manhood removed to Goshen or Conway, and then came to Phelps. He died in 1821 and is buried in Joslyn cemetery. His son, Dr. Caleb Bannister, was long a resident of Phelps, with a large practice. He was public-spirited and took much interest in educational and religious affairs. In 1852 he delivered before the Vienna Agricultural Society an historical address, which presented many incidents of the settlement days of Phelps. The address was published in pamphlet form and two or three times since in the Citizen and its predecessors. Dr. Caleb Bannister died at his home in Phelps village in 1862, aged 80 years. Dr. Caleb Bannister married Millicent Sternes, whose parents were pioneers of Phelps, and a group of at least nine children came to their home. The children became eminent in social and literary circles. Prof. William H. was of Union College, a classmate of President Chester A. Arthur, and for forty years was president of an academy in Rockland County. He died in 1900, aged 76 years. A son of his is Judge William H. Bannister of Nyack-on-the-Hudson. Caroline, a daughter of Dr. Caleb, married Rev. Dr. C. W. Bennett of Evanston, long connected with Garrett's Biblical Institute. Their remains were brought back to Phelps when they passed away, a few years ago. Melzar B. Bannister, son of Dr. Caleb, died in 1888. He and his family were connected with the Centenary church, Syracuse. Lawrence Stone Bannister died in Rochester in 1901, aged 89 years. Marshall Bannister, a son of Dr. Caleb, died when he was a young man, but he was a man of fine parts and a portrait artist of no mean skill. He painted the portrait of George Hubbell and wife, Roseanna Jackson, together with their young daughter, Jennie, now Mrs. Garrett Frisbie. Louis Bannister, who married S. B. Ayers of Penn Yan, had an active interest in Phelps. In fact the whole Bannister connection were interested in Phelps, and though most of them removed, they always spoke of Phelps as their home.

Colonel Ashel Bannister, son of Captain Lemuel, born in 1784, died in 1858. His wife was Polly Mighills. They had three children, Colonel Dwight Bannister, settled in Iowa,; and two daughters.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

The Barber Family - About the year of 1814, William Barber and family came from Bridport, Vt., to the locality of Geneva, where he was a farmer and teamster. His children were six girls and one boy. The son, Asa H., was born in Manlius, N. Y., where his parents then lived in 1806. He learned the trade of cabinet-making with William Sutton and soon afterward engaged in business at the location now occupied by William C. Barber. Asa H. began business in 1830, and there he continued until the time of his death, September 5, 1863. He was succeeded, however, by his son, William C., and the business has been maintained at this place for more than sixty-three years, the latter conducting only a general undertaking business, which his father had carried on in connection with his cabinet work, as was the custom of his day. Asa H. Barber married Abagail Cowles, by whom he had four children: William C., Alice, who became the wife of Abraham Turck, Harriet, and Alonzo S. In 1849, William C. Barber married Eliza S. Stewart, and they have had six children, three only of whom are living. Alza S., wife of William C., died in 1889.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Barker, J. Albert, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, August 7, 1851, son of John, a gardener of this town, and a native of England, who came to this country in 1850. He located in Canandaigua, where he lived until his death in 1881. Of his five children four are living. Our subject was educated at the common schools, then entered the store of A. S. Newman, where he remained until 1885, spending fifteen years there, then opened a store in his present location on Main street, where he has built up a very successful business. He deals in all kinds of medicines, drugs, toilet articles, paints, varnishes, etc. Mr. Barker married in July, 1877, Julia, daughter of James Glass, a native of England, who was a gardener here, and they have one son, Willie Glass, now in his fifteenth year. Mr. Barker is a member of the K. of P., an honorary member of the Mutual Hook & Ladder Company, and both he and his wife are members of the St. John Episcopal church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Barlow, Jesse, Phelps, was born at Amenia, Dutchess county, January 19, 1832, was a son of Elisha and Lucy (Darrow) Barlow, natives of Dutchess county.  The father, Hon. Elisha Barlow, was a native of Sandwich, Mass., who came with his father, Moses, and his grandfather, Peleg Barlow, to Poughkeepsie in 1756, when a boy. The Hon. Elisha Barlow was a member of assembly during 1800 and 1802, and was also a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1821. The ancestors were Cape Cod fishermen for several generations. Jesse Barlow married, March 9, 1869, Lavinia, daughter of Newton Carter, of Connecticut. They have one son, Howard Carter. In 1858 Mr. Barlow bought a half-interest in the Swift Mills in Phelps, and in 1870 bought out the remaining interest, and has been sole proprietor since that time; it going under the name of  the Barlow Roller Mills, having a capacity of fifty barrels of flour per day. The house of Deacon Moses Barlow, in which Jesse was born, was built prior to the Revolutionary War.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Fitch Reed Barnard, Richmond, was born January 1, 1852. His father, Captain Peter Pitts Barnard, was born in Livonia in 1812, and died in 1876. For the last forty years of his life he held two hundred acres of land in this town and seventy adjoining in Livonia. The stone house in which he lived, now occupied by his son and namesake, was built by him in 1850. His wife was Fanny, daughter of John F. Reed, and their five children were: Ellen A., wife of M. H. Ray; Elizabeth M., wife of J. P. Ray; Franc A., wife of R. C. Beach; Fitch R. and Peter Pitts. He married, second, Abby Jane Olney (Gray), who survives him. She resides in Rochester. Chauncey, father of Peter Pitts Barnard, was a native of Connecticut, and married Nancy, daughter of Captain Peter Pitts, of Richmond, and came to Livonia, where he lived and died. His father was Samuel, of Litchfield county, Conn. Fitch R. was married in 1879 to Sarah J. Jerome, daughter of Myron D. Jerome, of Livonia, and they have two children: Fannie E., born December 13, 1881, and Solon H., born December 10, 1887. Mr. Barnard is a Republican. Mrs. Barnard's father was born in this town, where Isaac B. Green now lives, and his father, John Jerome, married Sarah Aiken, whose family was among the first to settle at Allen's Hill. P. Pitts Barnard was born November 13, 1859, and married, October 21, 1885, Clara Jerome, daughter of Samuel Jerome, of Livonia, and their children are: Glenn H., born January 21, 1889, and P. Ray, born November 28, 1891.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Barnes, Albert F., Farmington, was born in Farmington May 24, 1824. He was educated in the common schools and Canandaigua and Macedon Academies, and followed farming. He married twice, first in December, 1848, Sarah M. Case, and had three children: Marion, who died at the age of a year and a half, and another son who lived but a few days, and Carrie L., who married Lewis Quackenbush of Penn Yan, now residing in Canandaigua. Mrs. Barnes died April 3, 1875, and he married second Christiana A. Robson, of Hartland, Niagara county. They had two daughters, Ethel L., who died at the age of four years, and one that was not named. Stephen Barnes, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Rhode Island December 24, 1791. He married twice, first to Charlotte Algier of his native place, and came here in 1810. They had three children: Emily, who married Clarkson Aldrich, they had one daughter, Charlotte, who died at the age of seventeen years; Ira, married Abigail Woodbury, they had five children, two sons and three daughters, Charles, Stephen, Frances, Susanna and Charlotte; Frances, married Henry Redfield and still lives in this town; the third child, Adaline, died when young.  Stephen Barnes married for his second wife, Rachel Wilbur of Macedon, Wayne county, in the year 1822. They had four children: Albert T., Stephen H., who died at the age of two years; Edward O. S. and Charlotte M. His mother's side was of the Friends denomination; her father, Henry Wilbur, being one of the early settlers of Friends who came from Massachusetts in the year 1792. He was an exemplary member of the Friends Society at Farmington during a period of nearly seventy years, he having lived to the age of ninety-four years. Stephen Barnes died August 18, 1865, and his wife, Rachel Barnes, twenty years later being January 14, 1885. Mrs. Barnes's father, Kendra Robson, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1803, and came to the United States with his parents and two brothers in 1820, locating in Niagara county. The family were members of the Society of Friends, the father, Michael Robson, having become convinced of the truths of the gospel as held by them, when a young man and following the seas. He was left an orphan when quite young, his father having died when he was but three years of age, and his mother before he was ten. He was bound apprentice to a sea captain when he was twelve years of age and following the seas for many years; he lived to the age of ninety-four years. Kendra Robson married Ruth Brecken, who also came from England ten years later. They had thirteen children: James K., John B., Mary A., Elizabeth C., Rachel L., Christiana A., William D., Charles M., Eliza J., Alice S., Henry L., Francis E., and Ella T. Twelve arrived at the age of manhood and womanhood; eight are still living.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

D. Eddy Barnes, Geneva, was born on the old homestead in the southern part of Geneva August 10, 1856. He was educated in the public schools, Canandaigua and Geneva Academies, and has always followed farming. He has married twice; first on October 17, 1878, Caroline, second daughter of Henry and Mary Hazlett of Seneca. Mrs. Barnes died April 29, 1891. For his second wife on December 7, 1892, he married Harriet, only daughter of Silas and Isabella Phinney, of Bellona, formerly of Friendship, Allegany county. Mr. Barnes's father, David, was born in Pennsylvania in 1798, and came with his parents here when an infant. He was one of the oldest pioneers , with all that the term implies and he, too, was a farmer. He married twice; first Martha Spencer of Yates county, by whom he had a son and a daughter, both deceased. For his second wife, he married Lucy A. Dorman of Seneca. They had two children: D. Eddy and Ella D., who married George Kelsey and had one daughter, Lucy, who is still living. Mrs. Kelsey died April 8, 1890. David Barnes, father of our subject, was a colonel in the State militia, and died April 9, 1871.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Barnes, Hurdman, Canandaigua, was born in England, April 14, 1814, and came to this country when seventeen years of age, where he worked two or three years for William Gorham on the farm. He married, in England, Martha Shaw, who died June 16, 1862, aged fifty-three years, leaving no children. Mr. Barnes married second, in June, 1864, Elizabeth Mitchell, widow of William Meeks, of Canandaigua, and they have had five children:  Martha Mary, Jesse, Frederick and Ellen, all of whom live at home. Mrs. Barnes died April 14, 1884.  He took little interest in public affairs, but devoted his time and attention to his farm interests.  The homestead consists of ninety-four acres, in good condition, on which the principal crops are grain and fruit, with four acres of vineyard. The home and residence of this pleasant family was erected about 1860 by Mr. Barnes, for whose memory the above is written.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Barnes, James W., Canandaigua, was born in Seneca in 1830, a son of John R., a farmer of that town, who lived on the farm settled by his father, James. John R. married Maria Goundry of Seneca, who bore him ten children, of whom four sons were in the War of the Rebellion. John R. died in 1863, aged about seventy two years. The early life of James W. was spent on the homestead. He was educated in the common schools, after leaving which he entered the dry goods store of P. A. Button at Geneva, with whom he remained, in Geneva and Canandaigua, about eight years. He then went with Richardson & Draper, and when in 1871 Mr. Draper established a bank here Mr. Barnes went with him as cashier, which position he filled until 1890. He then formed a copartnership with C. N. Williams, making the banking firm Williams & Barnes, which still exists. Mr. Barnes married in 1876 Martha, daughter of Stanton S. Cobb of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Barnes, Washington, Geneva, was born in the town of Seneca (now Geneva) April 10, 1819. He was educated in the schools of his day.  He afterward resided in Michigan, where he also attended  school. In early life he was a miller and farmer. In the year of 1872 he embarked in the nursery business with all the improved varieties of a first-class nursery conducted on first-class honest business principles. He has married twice, first August 8, 1844, Jane A. Mead of Benton, Yates county, and they had seven children:  Joshua M., Jane A., Catherine C., Frances and Sara A. (twins), George W., and Charles F. Mrs. Barnes died in 1860, and he married second, October 8, 1862, Mary A. Davies of the town of Milo, Yates county. Mr. Barnes's father, Thomas was born in Ireland and came to the United States with his parents when he was nine years old. He married Elizabeth Goundry of the town of Milo, Yates county, and they had twelve children.  The ancestry of this family is Irish, English and Welsh.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William T. Barnes, Geneva, was born in Seneca (now Geneva) August 15, 1817. He was educated in the schools of his day and owns the farm on which he was born. He is now a retired farmer. May 9, 1858, he married Mary J., daughter of George and Dolly Barden of Benton, Yates county, and they have four children: Grace E., who married Edward Black of Bellona and has a daughter, Maud J.; Albert W., who married Mary E. Sloan of Yates county and has four children: LeRoy F., Mary L., Karl and Alexander; Arthur L., who married Gertrude Turner of Yates county, they have one daughter, Bessie E.; and Fred C., who married Helen M. Scott of Geneva. Mr. Barnes's father, Thomas, was born in Ireland in 1777 and came to the United States with his father when six years old. He married Elizabeth Goundry, and had ten children who grew to maturity. Mrs. Barnes's father, George Barden, was born in Massachusetts in 1788, and came to this State with his parents when nine years old, where he married Dolly Witter of Pennsylvania, and had thirteen children. Mr. Barnes's father was a soldier in the War of 1812. Mrs. Barnes's grandfather, Thomas Barden, was a soldier in the War of the Revolution. Mr. Barnes's brother, George, served in the late war three years. Mrs. Barnes's brother, Tilson, also served in the second Michigan Cavalry three years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William M. Barnum, Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua, May 7, 1852. Ebenezer, the great-grandfather, was a native of Massachusetts, and one of his sons, Moses, was the grandfather of the subject. He was a farmer and came to Niagara county. He had five children, but one of whom survives, John, a farmer of Iowa. Jedediah, father of William M., was born June 16, 1820, and came to Ontario county when a child. When about ten years of age he went to live with an old lady on the lake shore with whom he remained until about fourteen, when he went to live with William Martin, and stayed with him until reaching his majority. When about twenty-six years of age he married Amanda, daughter of John Penoyer, of Academy, one of the earliest settlers of that tract. He owned at the time of his death, June 15, 1886, 275 acres. He never took an active interest in politics, but devoted his time to the farm. He was a strong advocate of temperance principles, and a Republican. He had two children: Imogene, wife of John B. Hall, and William M. William M. has always been a resident of this farm. He was educated in Canandaigua, and Rochester Business College, graduating in 1871. He taught school a short time, and then came back to assist his father on the farm. He is an active Republican. He married in 1872 Martha A., daughter of James Hyde, a farmer of Canandaigua, and they have three children: Fred C., Edith M., and Frank J. Mr. Barnum is a member of Academy Grange, of which he was a charter member, and is at present overseer.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

David Barron, Seneca, was born in Northumberland county, England, August 15, 1800, came to the United States with his parents in 1801, being less than a year old, and the family located on the turnpike road in the northeastern part of the town. He was educated in the schools of that day, inured to hard work, and became an intelligent farmer, even into his ninety-third year. March 22, 1827, he married Sarah Shadbolt, of Caledonia, Livingston county; they had five children: Martha, George, John, Mary, and David W., all now deceased. His wife died February 20, 1882. Mr. Barron's father, William, was born at the old home in England, March 25, 1756, and married Margery Wilkinson, of Newcastle in his native country. Their four children were: William, Mary, David and Thomas. The father died July 14, 1833, and the mother June 6, 1855. David Barron has always borne the reputation of a modest, industrious, thrifty, and honest man.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Barron, William J., Geneva, son of William and Ellen (Booth) Barron, was born in Caledonia, May 6, 1856. He received a common school education, and at the age of sixteen years came to Geneva and learned the blacksmith's trade. He carried on this business four years in Caledonia, four years in Geneva, and in the spring of 1890 bought the public sheds in Geneva. In 1877 he married Ann Thornton, of Geneva, and they have one son, David, born in 1878. Mr. Barron takes an active part in politics and is a staunch Republican.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

William W. Barron, Seneca, was born on the old homestead in Seneca, November 30, 1827. He was educated in the district schools (in the same school house his father was educated in), was reared on a farm, and learned the carpenter's trade, working at carpentry and joining for eighteen years. He then resumed farming which he follows to this date. February 13, 1859, he married Harriet Eddington, of this town, by whom he had one daughter, Margaret, who married Robert J. Plumb of Scottsville, Monroe county, and they have two sons, Howard and Clarence. Mrs. Barron died March 22, 1866, and he married second, May 3, 1870, Mary J. Taylor of Stanstead, Lower Canada. They had one daughter, Mabel B., who now presides over her father's household, her mother having died January 31, 1888, deeply mourned by husband, daughter and many friends. Mr. Barron's father, Thomas, was also born here, March 1, 1803, and February 4, 1827, married Margaret Watson, by whom he had three children: William W., John, who is in business in Geneva, and George, who died at the age of two years. His father, Thomas, died September 17, 1892, and his mother, March 26 1863. The family is of English origin on both sides.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Joseph A. Bartholomew, Naples, son of John, was born in Naples July 21, 1851, and prepared for college at the Naples Academy. In 1871 he entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and remained two years. He taught school a few years in Michigan, then went into business with his father at farming and stock breeding in Hillside, Mich. On the death of his father in 1891, he returned to Naples, where he has since resided. His mother was Julia French, born in Naples, who died in 1890. Mr. Bartholomew married February 24, 1883, Alice Seacord, daughter of Absalom and Hannah Seacord, of Naples. In his business relations, Mr. B. has always ranked "high," and was never asked, as he says, for an endorser till he began to deal with Presbyterians in Naples.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Sarah A. Baxter, Geneva, was born in Geneva, of English parents. She learned the art of dressmaking and has done business on her own account for twenty years. Her father, William Baxter, was born in Norfolk, England, June 16, 1807. He was an ingenious wood worker. October 1, 1833, he married Ann Thompson of his native place, and came to the United States in 1836, locating in Geneva. They had eight children: Sophia, Elizabeth, John, Sarah A., Mary E., George, Eliza A., and William. Her father died August 18, 1872.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Arnold W. Beach, Bristol, was born in Walworth, Wayne county, August 24, 1831, a son of Amos and Eleanor (Arnold) Beach, who reared four sons and five daughters. Mr. Beach and wife went to Richmond, where he died in 1835. Mrs. Beach then married Leonard Howard and removed to McComb county, Mich., where she died in 1873. Arnold W. Beach was reared by Dr. Daniel Durgan, and received a common school education. February 22, 1855, he married Adeliza M. Codding, a native of Bristol, born December 17, 1832. She is a daughter of Deacon Stephen A. Codding, a son of Faunce and Sallie (Andrews) Codding, early settlers of Bristol. Mr. and Mrs. Codding had four sons and a daughter. He died in Bristol in 1810 at the age of forty, and his wife in Lockport, Ill., at the age of eighty years. Mr. Beach and wife have had three children: Emma C., who died at the age of three years; Hattie M., born July 28, 1865, wife of Luther J. Howe, of Shortsville, and Stephen H., born August 14, 1874. Mr. Beach is a farmer, is a Republican, and has been overseer of the poor six years. He and wife are members of the Congregational church, of which Mr. Beach has been a deacon six years.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Levi S. Beach, a native of East Bloomfield, born November 18, 1808, is a son of Salmon Beach, a native of Connecticut, born in 1784. Salmon Beach was reared as a saddle and harness maker, and followed that trade many years in East Bloomfield. The wife of Salmon Beach was Aresta Waid, a native of Bristol, by whom he had two sons and four daughters. Mr. Beach at one time held the office of county clerk. He died in 1817, and his wife June 23, 1843. After his father's death, Levi S. Beach was reared by Isaac Newton. He first worked by the month and later engaged in farming and stock dealing, which he followed until 1872, since which time he has live a retired life. In 1831 Mr. Beach married Catherine Pulver, a native of Kinderhook, Columbia county, born August 6, 1809. and daughter of James Pulver. Subject and wife had six children: Charlotte A., Alice A., William S., George H., Edna A., and Adelia, of whom Charlotte and Edna only are living. In politics Mr. Beach was formerly a Whig, but is now a Republican. He and family are members of the M. E. Church. Charlotte A. is the wife of Almond Rowley, of East Bloomfield.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Richmond C. Beach, was born in Manchester, August 18, 1844. His father, Orrin B., was born in that town, and his grandfather, Nathaniel, was a native of Williamstown, Mass., and came to this county at an early day. Orrin B. married in 1842, Speedy, daughter of Daniel (3d) Short, and their children were: Richmond C., Lucy L., wife of George J. Ray, born in 1850; and Orrin S., born in 1854. Richmond C. was educated in the common schools and married in 1869 Frankie A., daughter of Peter P. Barnard, and they have two children: Mettie L., born November 12, 1870, and Bernard R., born July 24, 1879. In 1869 Mr. Beach purchased 160 acres, a portion of the farm of Philip Read 2d, on lot 50, on which he has good buildings.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Beahan, Dr. Albert L., Canandaigua, was born in Watkins, Schuyler county, April 13, 1855, a son of James Beahan, a farmer of that place. The early life of our subject was spent in the town of his birth. He was educated in Starkey Seminary from which he graduated in 1876, and immediately entered Bellevue Hospital Medical College, from which he graduated in 1879. After leaving school he went first to Reading Centre, where he practiced about four years, and then went to New York city, where he spent two winters studying on specialties. The spring of 1884 he came to Canandaigua, opening an office on Gorham street, which he has ever since continued, having built up a lucrative practice. In 1886 he was elected coroner on the Republican ticket, and in 1889 re-elected by a largely increased majority. Dr. Beahan is president of the Society of Physicians of Canandaigua, health officer of the town, and has been for six years physician of the Ontario County Almshouse. He is member of New York State Medical Society, the Medical Association of Central New York, Ontario County Medical Society, and Society of Physicians of the village of Canandaigua. He married in March, 1889, Theodora C. Hopkins, of Canandaigua.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Embery J. Beal, Clifton Springs, was born in Manchester, December 19, 1834. His grandfather, Caleb Beal, and grandmother, Rachel Redfield Beal, emigrated to this State in the winter of 1813 from Massachusetts on a sleigh drawn by horses, an unusual occurrence (oxen being the common mean of conveyance in those days.). They stopped at Lemuel Bannister's in Phelps, whose wife was Caleb Beal's sister. There they remained until April, when they moved on a tract of land on "Hog Back Hill," in the town of Palmyra. After a number of years they erected a large farm house, which still stands. Caleb Beal during his eventful life was a man of strong personality and powerful frame. He was for a time in the early days of the county intimately associated with six different tribes of Indians, who loved and respected him for his sterling worth, and with whom he exerted great influence. Washington Beal, son of Caleb Beal, and father of Embery J. Beal, was born in the town of Conway, Mass., September 13, 1803. He married Eliza H. Holmes, daughter of Nathaniel Holmes, of Manchester, and settled on a farm in said town, where he lived until his death. He was a man of positive likes and dislikes, ever sustaining his views of right against all opposition. He was an efficient exhorter of the M. E. Church, being much respected and esteemed. He died in Manchester, where he first settled, after a long and useful life, on the 24th of February, 1889, at the age of eighty-five years, five months, eleven days. Embery J. Beal received a fair education at the public schools and at an academy in Macedon Center, Wayne county. He married Frances J. Tiffany, of Walworth, after which he lived with his father a few years, then settled on the farm known as the John P. Salor farm, which he owns at this date. They have two daughters: Josephine E., who has completed a course at the Commercial College at Elmira; and Calla E., who is attending the Brockport Normal School, fitting herself for a teacher's life. Embery J. has followed agricultural pursuit until six years since (1886) when he retired, renting his farm to a tenant, removing first to Palmyra, and three years ago to Clifton Springs. Mr. Beal is a man much beloved and respected. He is of a generous and upright character, a strong Prohibitionist in his convictions, and a faithful and loving father to his intelligent family. 



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