"Br" to "Bz" Family Sketches



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Romeyn W. Brace, the subject of this sketch, was born in Victor, at the old homestead on Brace street, two miles south of the village, November 30, 1846. He was educated at the public schools, following the occupation of farming until he reached the age of twenty-eight. Then he removed to the village with his father, Thomas B., and engaged in the hardware and machinery business, in which he continued two years. Selling out the hardware trade, he has continued the carriage and implement business up to the present time, occupying a store on the north side of Main street. December 11, 1867, he married Mary E., daughter of John L. and Eliza Alverson, of Victor. They have three children: Romeyn T., Mary E., and Leon W. Mrs. Brace's father, John Lewis Alverson, was born in 1814, and married Eliza Cornwell, formerly of Scipio, Cayuga county, and had eight children, three of them dying in infancy. Mr. Brace's father, Thomas B., was born in Victor, January 17, 1812, and died June 29, 1889; he was educated in the public schools, and was for many years a farmer. November 16, 1834, he married Margaret Octavia Jackson of his native town. She was born in Oneida county, February 2, 1814, and died March 8, 1882. They had two children: Minerva L. and Romeyn W. His grandfather, Major William Brace, was born in Stockbridge, Mass., in 1791, came to Victor with his parents when two years old, being two years after the first settlement in the town. He married Lucinda, daughter of Dr. Thomas Beach. Four children were born to them, two dying in infancy, two survived: William and Thomas B. He served in the War of 1812, and was present at the burning of Buffalo; he was the son of Elisha Brace, who with his three brothers purchased several sections of land, comprising the northeast corner of the town, of the original owner, Enos Boughton, afterward exchanging it for a tract of land known as Brace street, to which they removed. Mr. and Mrs. Brace are members of the Universalist church here.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Andrew Jackson Bray, Richmond, was born August 13, 1848. His paternal grandfather, Andrew Bray, was born July 4, 1763, in New Jersey, and married Mary Yawger, by whom he had nineteen children. He settled in Scipio, Cayuga county, where his son, Andrew 2d, was born June 13, 1808. The latter married Catharine Ann Yawger, and their children were: Philip Y., born in 1833; Ann Eliza (Hough) born in  1836; Mary (Black) of East Bloomfield, born in 1838; Nancy (Black), of Buffalo, born in 1840; and Andrew J. Andrew 2d followed boating on the canals, and quarrying plaster, and after settling in this town became a farmer and fisherman. His house was on the east side of Honeoye Lake, where his son, Andrew J. now lives. For thirty years he drew his several seines in the lake, often catching over half a ton of fish in a single night. One night he caught 7,000 white fish. He died March 30, 1886. Andrew J. was educated in the district and select schools of this town, and at Rochester Commercial College. In 1875 he married Emma Eliza Skinner, and they have had four children: Philip, who died the age of one year; Bertha, born March 19, 1878; Fanny, born December 10, 1879, and Katie, born November 6, 1886. Mr. Bray has three farms, containing in all about 242 acres. His home overlooks Honeoye Lake, and the attractive situation draws many visitors and picnic parties, who, with the boat livery and other conveniences provided by Mr. Bray, spend the summer days pleasantly.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Brewster, the late Nathan P., was born May 9, 1820, and was by occupation a woolen manufacturer at Shortsville, N.Y.  September 4, 1845, he married Harriet A., daughter of Allen and Sophronia (Compton) Payne of Farmington. They had two children:  Anna A. and Mary E.  Mr. Brewster died in 1859. Mrs. Brewster's father, Allen Payne, was born in Farmington, November 22, 1801, and married Sophronia Compton, by whom he had seven children, as follows:  Amanda, born July 25, 1824; William, born June 4, 1826; Harriet A., born October 22, 1827; David, born July 13, 1829; William J., born December 6, 1832; Marvin A., born June 19, 1834; and Hannah M., born May 9, 1837.  Allen Payne was one of the largest land owners in the town of Farmington. He died October 31, 1837, and his wife April 5, 1885.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Briggs, E. Elihu, Bristol, was born in Bristol September 25, 1835, reared on a farm and educated in East Bloomfield Academy. At the age of seventeen he engaged in teaching for five years in connection with farming, since which time he has followed farming exclusively. He owns sixty-three and one-half acres, which he purchased in 1867. Mr. Briggs has been thrice married. First, in 1854 to Emeline, daughter of Rev. Abner Reed. They had four children: William, Frank, Helen and Elnathan. Mrs. Briggs died in 1868, and in 1870 Mr. Briggs married Mary Ann Johnson, daughter of Phineas Johnson. By his second wife Mr. Briggs had two children: Ina E. and Lewis B. Mrs. Mary Ann Briggs died in 1884 and in 1886 Mr. Briggs married Lucrecia Kingsbury, daughter of Hampton Kingsbury, with whom he is still living. Mr. Briggs is a member of the People's party. He is now serving his third year as president of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Hop-growers" Association of Bristol. He is a member of Bristol Grange of which he has been secretary for fifteen years, and is a member of the Farmers' Alliance, and also secretary of that organization. He and family attend the Universalist Church at Bristol. E. Elihu Briggs is a son of William Briggs, a son of Elihu, a son of Zenas, who was a native of Massachusetts. William W. Briggs, father of the subject, was born in Bristol September 20, 1811. In 1861 he purchased fifty-four acres of land, and spent his last active days as a farmer. In 1879 he came to Bristol Hill and has since lived a retired life. November 13, 1834, he married Nancy Briggs of Massachusetts, born November 8, 1814, a daughter of Enoch and Abigail Briggs. William W. Briggs and wife had six children: E. Elihu, George W., Melvina A., Elnathan G., Ruth S. and Nannie L.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

John C. Briggs, Richmond, was born September 21, 1853. His father, Cyrus, was born in 1820 in the house now occupied by his son, which was built by the father of Cyrus, Artemas, in 1817. The latter was born in 1786 in Dighton, Mass., and came on foot to Bristol, Ontario county, in 1806. In 1809 he married in Bristol, Fanny Gregg, born in 1789. His father, Jedediah, was born in 1738. He had thirteen children, several of whom came to this county. Artemas traded his farm in Bristol for one here, whither he removed in 1814. He served in the War of 1812, and fought in several of the battles on the Niagara frontier. He settled on the west side of Honeoye Lake, and owned land south of Main street in Honeoye. He and his son, Jedediah, each gave half the land for the original cemetery and he gave the land for the First Methodist church. He was one of the founders of the church here. The edifice stood on the site of Mrs. Phillips's house on Lake street. His children were: John G., born in 1811; Jedediah, born in 1815; Fanny, born in 1818; Cyrus, born in 1820, and Mary, born in 1823. Cyrus was educated at East Bloomfield Academy, and was a farmer. He married first Emeline M. Michael, daughter of Thomas M. Michael, a tanner here, and they had two sons: Zachary J., born in 1849, and John C. He married second Cynthia E. Hadley, by whom he had no children. He died in 1888. John C. married in 1878 Minnie A., daughter of John Van Buren. She was born November 8, 1857. They have had two children; Fred J., born in 1885, died in 1889, and Hattie F., born May 26 1889. Mr. Briggs farms the old original homestead first taken up by Abel Short and later owned by Artemas Briggs. Jedediah, brother of Artemas Briggs, was born in 1779 and was a sea captain. During the War of 1812 he was captured by the English and taken to England, returning after the war. Enoch, the oldest brother, born in 1770, came after Artemas, and settled in Bristol, where his descendants may be found at the present time. The ancestry of the family dates back to Sir Robert Briggs of England, who lived about thirteen generations back.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Zachary J. Briggs, Richmond, son of Cyros, was born February 13, 1849, and was educated at Canandaigua Academy and at Lima Seminary. He married in 1871 Ann Eliza, daughter of Theodore Sleght. She was born in Canandaigua, where her grandfather, Andrew, came when a young man. They have had three children: Irving C., born in October, 1872; Fannie E., born in 1875, died in 1887; Harry F., born in 1887. Zachary J. Briggs has always followed farming. He built his residence in 1883. this is half a mile south of the old homestead and commands a fine view of the lake and rural scenery.



From Phelps Citizen 17 April 1919

John Brink came to Phelps from New Jersey. He died in 1821 leaving widow and growing family. The widow, Diana ____, died in 1848, aged about 90 years. The burial place is on the Brink-Westfall place, on the east side of the old Pre-emption road. The daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1788, married George Westfall. She died in 1828 leaving Monce, who soon died, Diana, Peter and Levi, another daughter married ____ Westfall, whose first name I would be glad to learn. A daughter, Jane, married
_____ Shephard of whom I would like to know. The sons were Reuben Brink, who married and died 1834, leaving wife, Hannah, and children, Anthony, John, Josiah, Priscilla, Mary, who married John Westfall, David, Elton born in 1817, died in Olive, Mich., 1887, Irena, Jane and Marah Ann. The names of these children was learned from his will in Surrogate's office, Canandaigua. Simon and Cornelius were also sons of John Brink.

Henry W. Brink, I surmise, was a son of John, the Phelps pioneer, came when very young and in 1830 married and removed to Illinois in 1841, where he died March 7, 1886, aged 77 years. His youngest brother, Leman H. Brink died at his home in Iowa on hearing of the death of his older brother, Henry W. Brink. The Brinks were an industrious family, good farmers.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Benjamin S. Brocklebank, was born at his present residence in Canandaigua, December 18, 1835. The grandfather, Samuel, was a native of New England and one of the earliest settlers here. John B., the father of our subject, was born in this town in 1797, and married Chloe Sanger. They had seven children, five of whom are living: Walter S., a farmer of Hopewell; Electa Negas of Michigan; Emily C. Anderson of Wyoming; John of Battle Creek, Mich.; and Benjamin S. John B. died in March, 1858, and his wife died July, 1852. Benjamin S. was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and assisted on the farm until twenty-two years of age. He then started for himself by renting the farm adjoining on the north. After spending one year there he bought a farm of 145 acres in school district No. 20, where he made his home until 1880, when he returned to the old homestead, which he has ever since made his home. This is a good farm of 100 acres where Mr. Brocklebank does general farming. He has never taken any active interest in politics or public affairs, but is one of the representative farmers of this town. He married March 18, 1868, Ellen, daughter of John S. Jones, of Victor, and they have had two sons, Floyd B., who conducts the farm in the west part of town, and L. Ray, who lives at home. Mrs. Brocklebank died July 3, 1892, aged fifty-three years. She left many friends to mourn her loss. She was a devoted wife and mother, and a member of the Presbyterian church of Victor.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Henry Brooks, Canandaigua, was born in Cheshire, Conn., January 27, 1814. The family in this country originated from three brothers, who came from England, and settled in Cheshire, Conn. The grandfather of our subject, Henry, was the father of a large family, among his sons being Henry, jr., the father of Henry. He married Rosetta Hull, and had four children, Henry being the only one living. His father died the year of his birth, and he moved with his mother to Ontario county and settled in Canandaigua. She died in Farmington in April, 1846. Henry was educated in the common schools, and as soon as he was old enough went to work on farms at driving oxen. In 1858 he bought a farm of fifty acres in Canandaigua, to which he has added thirty-seven acres, and devotes the farm to grain. Mr. Brooks married November 30, 1837, Elvira, daughter of Israel Lathrop, of Geddes, Onondaga county, and they had six children, three of whom lived to adult age: Maria, who lives at home; Mary, wife of Francis Walker, a machinist of Newark, O.; and Henry F. The latter was born March 20, 1852, was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and began farming on his father's place. March 29, 1876, he married Mary J., daughter of Richard Purdy, of Canandaigua, by whom he had three children, two George E. and Henry F., survive him. Their father was drowned in Honeoye Lake, June 11, 1884, and a large community mourned his death. He was conscientious, a member of the church, and a devoted son.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

J. A. Brooks, Clifton Springs, was born in Broome county, N. Y., February 15, 1859. He received a good education in the schools of that vicinity and Cortland Normal School. Is also a graduate of Lowell's Business College, Binghamton. He was engaged in mercantile work after this for four years; then was identified with Y. M. C. A. work for two or three years as general secretary. Mr. Brooks then became identified with the Clifton Springs Manufacturing Company, of which he is the superintendent and a trustee. He married Miss A. M. Place of Broome county, and they have one child, a boy. Mr. Brooks is a member of the Methodist Church and is a member of The American Association of Inventors and Manufacturers.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Dr. William R. Brooks, Geneva's famous astronomer, was born at Maidstone, England, June 11, 1844. His father, a Baptist minister, came to this country when his son was but 13 years of age and settled at Darien, N. Y. As a boy, Wm. R. made a voyage to Australia and this greatly increased his interest in astronomy and after coming to this country in 1857, he began the study of the science in earnest. At the age of fourteen years, he built his first telescope, which was finished just in time for him to get a glimpse of Donati's famous comet in 1858. At 17 he delivered his first astronomical lecture, illustrated with charts which he made for himself, the lecture being in his father's church. These were the early days of photography, in which he became deeply interested, and he was a pioneer in the art of celestial photography. For three years Dr. Brooks was employed in Buffalo, where he became a skilled mechanical draughtsman and subsequently filled important positions in Syracuse and Providence, R. I., with the Corliss Steam Engine Company of Worcester and Boston. In 1870 he settled in Phelps and established himself as a photographer and there continued his astronomical studies. He discovered his first comet on October 4, 1881. Later, while still at Phelps, other comets were added and in 1888 he came to Geneva to the William Smith observatory. Twelve years later he became professor of astronomy at Hobart College, which position he held until his death, May 3, 1921. He was responsible for the discovery of 27 comets and was widely known as a lecturer on astronomical subjects.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Andrew Brown, Canadice, was born in Springwater, Livingston county, September 26, 1839. His father, Thomas Brown, a native of Niagara county, settled in Springwater early in 1830, and was a farmer in that town. He married Sylvia Bates, who was born in Lima. Orlando, only brother of Andrew, was born in 1836. Andrew was educated at the district schools and has always been a farmer. He married in 1877, Janette, daughter of Luke Johnson, of Canadice, and they have two children living: Sylvia C., born in 1878, and Martha Ann, born 1889. Mr. Brown has 200 acres in his home farm on Ball Hill, and is a Democrat in politics. Luke Johnson married Martha Ann Grant, a native of Springwater, and his children were: Benjamin Franklin of Springwater; Janette (Brown); Homer Luke, a farmer in this town; and Bradley M.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

C. P. Brown, Shortsville, was born at Nassau, Rensselaer county. in 1824. He received an excellent education in the schools of that vicinity, and early became identified with the Empire Drill Company of Shortsville. He is now the largest stockholder of this concern. Mr. Brown has held the office of trustee of the village since its incorporation. His wife was Cornelia E. Drummond, and they have four children living.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Brown, Charles L., Victor, was born in Lodi, Seneca county, March 25, 1852. He was educated in the public schools and Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College of Rochester. He is at present in the drug store of Frank E Cobb. Mr. Brown has been treasurer of the village, collector of the town, and is serving his second term as town clerk.  He has also been secretary of the American Legion of Honor. January 27, 1880, he married Mary A., only child of Montgomery and Johanna Camp of Victor, and they have two children:  Vera H. and Tuthill G. Rev. John M. Brown, father of Charles L., was born in 1818, and received an academic education.  He married Eliza A. Graham of Orange county, and they had two sons and a daughter:  William G., Charles L., and Alice G., who died aged twenty-four years.  Mr. Brown was retired from active service in the church (M.E.) after fifty years of continuous ministry, without missing an appointment. He enlisted in the Eleventh New York Volunteers for three years and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. His position was such that he received very fine locations and churches, and in the conference served on several important committees.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Francis L. Brown, Shortsville, was born in Newark, town of Arcadia, Wayne county, N. Y., November 12, 1841. He was educated in the schools of Wayne county and Nassau, Rensselaer county. In 1861, April 22, he enlisted in the Thirty-third Regiment New York Infantry, Company D. Mr. Brown remained in this regiment until 1863, when he received his discharge on the 2d of June from Company G, to which he had been transferred. He returned to Ontario county and raised a cavalry company, of which he was appointed captain, and which was mustered into the United States service January 19, 1864, as Company L, Twenty-fourth Regiment New York Cavalry. Captain Brown was severely wounded at Bethesda Church June 1, 1864, the beginning of the three days' fight at Cold Harbor. Captain Brown remained in service when he had to walk with a crutch and when on horseback carry his crutch in his hand. He was with Grant and Sheridan at Appomattox, and was finally mustered out at the close of the war as senior captain of his regiment. Captain Brown then returned to Shortsville and entered the employ of H. L. and c. P. Brown, manufacturers of grain drills. In the spring of 1867 he commenced the study of law in the office of Folger & Mason at Geneva, and took a two years' law course at Ann Arbor, Mich. He was admitted to the bar at the General Term in June, 1869, and has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. Captain Brown is a prominent member of the G. A. R., is a trustee of the Manchester Cemetery Association, and also of the Herendeen Post Soldiers' Monument Association, and mainly through his efforts an imposing soldiers' monument has been erected at Shortsville. He never held any political office. In 1879 he was the Republican candidate for member of assembly in the First Assembly District of Ontario county, but was beaten because the district was strongly Democratic. He carried his own town by a majority of 198, which was at that time the largest majority that the town had ever given any candidate for a contested position. In January, 1870, he was united in marriage to Miss Flora E. Wilcox, of Geneva, and they have a family of eight children, six sons and two daughters.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Levi Aldrich Brown was born in the southern part of the town of Farmington, January 10, 1813, on the place where he now resides and has resided there since 1834. The Brown homestead was originally bought for twenty-five cents per acre. He was educated in the common and select schools and followed farming. July 2, 1834, he married Lorana B., daughter of Esek and Sarah Aldrich, of Farmington. They have no children. Mr. Brown's father, William, was born in Cumberland, R. I., February 28, 1778. He married Martha Hill, of Swansea, R. I., in Farmington October 27, 1805, and had four children: Chloe, Hannah M., Nancy Jane and Levi A. Chloe died when she was six years old. The father was killed in a friendly wrestling match with a neighbor, April 28, 1814, and the mother married Jacob Smith, a son of one of the first settlers of the town. They had three children: Mary, William and Phebe. Mrs. Brown's father, Esek Aldrich, was born August 29, 1779, in Northbridge, Worcester county, Mass., and came to Farmington March 1, 1801, and went back for his mother in 1802, and she rode the entire distance on horse-back. He married Sarah Birdsall, of Perinton, Monroe county, April 14, 1811, and they had six children: Clarkson, Royal, Lorana B., Joseph B., Esek and Jessie B. Mrs. Brown's father, Esek Aldrich, died May 28, 1858. He was a descendant of George Aldrich, of Berkshire, Eng., the first Aldrich who came to America in 1631. Her mother died December 7, 1857. On both the paternal and maternal sides they are Orthodox Friends. One of Mrs. Brown's uncles, Stephen Aldrich, was the first physician in the town of Farmington.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Rev. Silas Clark Brown, West Bloomfield, was born in Northampton, Mass., in 1797. He settled in Steuben county, where he taught school several years. He graduated from Union College in 1826 and was at Auburn Theological Seminary in 1827. He came to West Bloomfield about 1828 and married in 1830, Mary Cleveland of Livonia, who was born in Brookline, Conn., in 1800. Their children were: Lucia, Mary, wife of Rev. H. H. Reid of New York; Sarah Louisa, now residing in her pleasant home in this town; Henry Clark, also of this place; and Augustus Cleveland, a lawyer in New York. Mr. Brown became a Congregational clergyman, and began his first pastorate here, April 23, 1828. He preached also in Batavia, York and other places, and died here in 1876, after several years of retirement. His son, Henry C., born in 1841, was educated in Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, at Watertown Academy and at the East Bloomfield Academy. He married in 1866 Amanda G. Sears of East Bloomfield, and has three sons: Henry Sears, Albert Reid and Augustus Cleveland.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Buck, Rev. Daniel Dana, Geneva, was born in Lebanon, N. H., September 10, 1814. While yet a child, the family emigrated to the "Westward," as it was then termed, and settled in Scottsville, a few miles south of Rochester. When he was fourteen years old, he was taken into the employ of Mr. John Mitchell, a merchant of Scottsville, with whom he continued three years. Then he found employment as a clerk in a mercantile house in Rochester for five years, when he was licensed to preach by the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Rochester, and was recommended for admission into the General Conference. According to the usage of the M. E. church, after being on trial for two years, he was admitted into full connection, and was ordained as a deacon. Two years thereafter he was elected to the order of elders, and was ordained as an elder. Mr. Buck continued in the regular itinerant ministry, being appointed from year to year to various pastoral charges by the bishops until he had rendered forty years of effective service. Feeling then the infirmities of age, and the need of rest and recuperation, with permission of the Conference he retired from the effective ranks, and located his residence in Geneva. Since making this his home, without a regular pastoral charge, he has been employed much of the time as a temporary pulpit supply for various churches of his own denomination, and also for the Reformed (Dutch) Church, the North Presbyterian Church, and the Baptist Church, in Geneva. In the spring of 1861 Mr. Buck was commissioned as chaplain of the Twenty-seventh Regiment New York State Volunteers, Colonel, (afterwards Major-General) Slocum commanding. After about one year in the service, being disabled by malarial disease, he was honorably discharged from the service. Mr. Buck is the author of several volumes, ranging in size from 18 mo. to octavo, and has contributed several articles for Quarterly Reviews. He has published several minor productions, mostly in prose, but some in poetry. He has been twice honored with the complimentary title of Doctor of Divinity, once by Allegheny College, at Meadville, Penn., and once by the Illinois Wesleyan University, at Bloomington, Ill. Mr. Buck has been twice married: first, in 1837 to Philena Aldrich, of Rochester, who died in 1869. The next year he was married to Mrs. Lorana Aldrich, of Rochester. By his first wife he had a son, Milton Dana, who graduated from Syracuse University in the class of '75. He immediately accepted a call to a professorship in Napa College, an institution belonging to the California Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. After two or three years' service in the college, he entered upon what he considered to be his special life work, the regular ministry of the Gospel, and since that time, as pastor or presiding elder, he has been regularly employed in the ministry in that Conference. Professor Buck married Martha Ross Amos, who graduated at Napa College while he was connected with that institution. They have had four children, only two of whom survive.



From Ontario County Journal 30 June 1899

The Buell homestead, in East Bloomfield, was the the scene of a happy event yesterday afternoon, when 68 of the direct descendants of Timothy Buell came together to commemorate the one-hundredth anniversary of the emigration of their forefather from Goshen, Conn., through the wilderness of the western country to Bloomfield, there to take up his abode. The day was in in itself perfect, the rain of the preceding night having freshened everything and taken away the dust. The guests were received on the spacious lawn, and under some of the very trees which had afforded shade and comfort to the rugged pioneer with his wife and six children, 100 years before, a cordial welcome was extended to them by the host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Buell, and their sons and daughters, Dr. Harry C. Buell, John Buell, Mrs. John H. Jewett and Miss Florence Buell. 

The interior of the house was artistically decorated for the occasion. One room was devoted to the antiquities of the family, including the commission of Captain Timothy Buell in Connecticut militia; deeds, reading stand, candlesticks, tall clock, cradle, anvils costing $1100, and sickles brought from Connecticut in 1799; lace embroidered by Esther Rice, lace by Caroline Buell, spinning wheel, swift reel, wool cards, flax hetchel, large pewter plate, silver knee buckles worn by Captain Timothy Buell, hair trunk used by Timothy, Jr., and Lucy Buell on their wedding journey in 1814; china sugar bowl belonging to Captain Timothy Buell, pillow cover made from Captain Timothy's camlet cloak, foot stoves, kneading trough, chopping knives made and used by Captain Timothy; hammers and various tools made and used by Captain Timothy, old pictures, furniture and articles of wearing apparel and old china, cradle that has rocked three generations.

At 1 o'clock a lunch was served, after which the history of the family was given by various members. Mrs. Charles Buell traced the history of the family previous to its settlement in East Bloomfield. The common ancestor of all the Buell name in America was William Buell, born in Chesterton, Huntingdonshire, England in 1610. At the age of 20, when the religious persecutions were at their height, he joined a company of Puritans, under the leadership of Rev. John Wareham, and sailed for America in the ship Mary and John  on March 30, 1630, and landed at Nantucket on May 30. He first settled in Dorchester, Mass., but five years later he became a pioneer and proprietor in the settlement at Windsor, Conn.

Brief sketches of his descendants were given until Captain and Deacon Timothy Buell, the fifth in line was reached. This interesting personage was born in Goshen, Conn., in 1757, the there he lived until the Revolutionary war broke out, when he enlisted with Oliver Norton, Cyprian Collins, John Doud and William Beach, all of whom afterwards settled in Bloomfield. Captain Buell was with Washington in his retreat from New York and witnessed the surrender of Burgoyne. On November 13, 1777, he married Olive Norton of Goshen and in February, 1799, they with their children, Lucy, Eunice, Jonathan, Theron, Timothy and Eben, set out for the west. Reaching here, 100 acres of the present farm was purchased of Joel Steele. The present house was built in 1816, the carpenter work being done by his son, Theron Buell. In 1815 his wife died, and one year later he married the widow of Ebenezer Norton. Mrs. Buell related many amusing incidents
of these early days connected with the Indians, by whom Mr. Buell was held in highest esteem. In his later days, Mr. Buell was cared for by his son, Timothy, who succeeded him in the ownership of the homestead.

The history of his descendants was presented by Dr. Jesse Buell of Rochester, Augustus Buell of East Bloomfield and Fred F. Buell of Troy. Dr. Jesse Buell, of Rochester, represented the branch of Jonathan Buell; Augustus Buell of East Bloomfield, Timothy Buell; Frederick F. Buell, of Troy, Theron Buell.

The following guests from out-of-town were present: Dr. Jesse Buell, Walter Buell, Mrs. Frances Rattray, Mrs. Harrison Wilson, Howard L. Wilson, Misses Carrie and Edna Hart, Miss Bessie Buell Haskins, of Rochester; Miss Jennie Buell, Mrs. Herman Mynter, Captain and Mrs. Holmes of Buffalo; Frederick F. Buell of Troy; Mr. and Mrs. George Munson, Frederic Munson and Miss Louise Munson of Brooklyn; Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Steele and children of Geneva; Mrs. S. Collins Hart, Dr. and Mrs. John H. Jewett and children, and Dr. H. C. Buell of Canandaigua; Mrs. Phebe G. Massey and Misses Anine M. and Clara E. Massey of Watertown; Dr. and Mrs. William A. Buell, Mr. and Mrs. James Peck, Miss Fannie Peck and Mrs. Elvira Grover of Lima.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Augustus Buell, East Bloomfield, was born January 31, 1824, a son of Timothy, who was also a son of Timothy, a Revolutionary soldier from Goshen, Conn., who was twice married. In 1792 he came to East Bloomfield, and was an organizer and deacon of the Congregational church. He reared six children: Jonathan, Timothy, Theron, Eben, Eunice and Lucy. He died in 1849, aged ninety-three years. His son Timothy was born in Connecticut in 1790, and came with his parents in 1792 to East Bloomfield, where he owned a homestead. He served as assemblyman in 1845, and as supervisor many years. He was also captain of militia, and died aged eighty-three. He married Lucy, daughter of Daniel and Aurelia (Dowd) Rice, and had eight children, four sons and four daughters. His wife died twelve days after her husband, at the age of seventy-nine years. Augustus was reared on a farm and received a district and academical education, at the the age of twenty-one beginning for himself. In 1850 he bought his present residence, together with his brother, and later bought out the latter's share. He is a Republican in politics. He has been three times married. His first wife was Electa Gauss, by whom he had six children, two surviving to adult age: Timothy, who died aged twenty-seven, and Arthur. His wife died in 1872, and he married second, Mary, daughter of William Conklin, by whom he had three children: William C., Lucy R. and Caroline L. His second wife died in 1885, and he married third, Mary H., daughter of Henry Shaw. Subject has been connected for forty-two years with the Congregational church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Charles Buell, East Bloomfield, was born where he now resides, June 14, 1829. His father was Timothy, son of Timothy, who came from Goshen, Conn., in 1792, and died here in 1849, aged over ninety-two years. His first wife was Olive Norton, by whom he had these children: Jonathan, Timothy, Eben, Theron, Lucy and Unice. He married, second, Charity Norton, by whom he had no children. The father of our subject was born in Connecticut in 1792, came to Bloomfield and died in January, 1873. He was a Republican, and served as assemblyman and supervisor. He was a director of the Ontario and Livingston Insurance Company, and was a progressive and enterprising citizen. He married Lucy, daughter of Daniel and Aurelia (Dowd) Rice, and they had these children: Frederick, Augustus, Charles, John (who enlisted in Company B, Eighty-fifth New York Volunteers; he was taken prisoner at Plymouth N. C., in 1864, and died in Andersonville prison September 7, 1864; he was a sergeant); Olive, Caroline, Alice and Ellen. Charles received a district school and academic education, and at the age of twenty-one began life for himself. He has always lived on the homestead, and owns 143 acres. He is a Republican in politics. His wife was Anna Dunn, born in Attica, by whom he has four children: Kezzie, wife of Dr. John H. Jewett; John L., Harry C. and Florence. Subject's mother died two weeks after her husband.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Birdsey Hawley Burch, Canadice, was born in Salisbury, Litchfield county, Conn., September 30, 1831. His father, John I. was of English descent, and a native of Rhode Island. He married Fidelia Race, and came to Canadice in 1842. Of their eight children four are now living: Henry of Newark, N. J.; Laura, widow of G. Gibbs, of Wassaic, N. Y.; Thomas, who lives in Union Springs, but whose business is in Syracuse; Sabrina E., wife of Albert Stone, of New York; and Birdsey H., who was educated at Claverack near Hudson, and at the schools here. He married in 1859 Alvira Adams, daughter of Joseph and Charlotte Adams, and they have one son, Marcus Bronson, born in 1861, now a billing clerk in the employ of the D. L. & W. R. R. Co. at Dansville, N. Y. He married Delta, daughter of D. S. and Mary Beam. Mr. Burch has one hundred and sixteen acres in his farm on the east side of Canadice Lake, and has for three years been engaged in buying and shipping hay to New York and New England. He has served as commissioner of highways and collector, and was supervisor in 1886-87, being a Democrat in politics. The children of Joseph and Charlotte Adams are: Hester Ann Spaulding, who lives in Michigan; Margaret Snook, who lives in California; and Alvira, wife of Mr. Burch.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

J. M. Burgdorf, Clifton Springs, was born at Honeoye Falls, January 3, 1855. He was the son of the Rev. J. C. Burgdorf, who was preaching there at that time, but subsequently moved to Yellow Springs, O., Newark, Wayne county, Rural Grove, Montgomery county, Union Springs, Cayuga county, where he finished his ministry. After retiring he finally settled in Clifton Springs, where he died on April 30, 1889, and was buried there. J. M. Burgdorf began business in Newark, Wayne county, where he lived in 1876, when he married Miss Lottie, youngest daughter of William Wayne, of Clifton Springs. In 1877 he established himself in the furniture and undertaking business in this village, and has so won the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens that his trade has assumed large and prosperous proportions, despite the fact that his establishment was completely consumed by fire in 1882, causing a heavy loss to him on account of small insurance and the burning of books. In 1888 he erected his present spacious salesrooms, consisting of three floors 40x90 feet. His thorough business qualifications caused him to make a special study of the embalming of the dead, and in this work he is rated among the best. He had received many very complimentary letters from noted and wealthy people of all parts of the United States, who were obliged to call upon him in the capacity of undertaker to conduct the preservation and distant transit necessary to the removal of deceased friends, whose cases have been among the incurable at the Sanitarium, to their far away homes. He is considered one of the most energetic and influential members of the community in which he lives, is connected with the Legion of Honor, A. O. U. W. and K. of P. Mr. and Mrs. Burgdorf have two daughters, Mae and Belle.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Silas Burge, Bristol, was born in Athens, O., in 1818. His father, Joseph, spent his life as a farmer in Ohio, and Silas was educated in the common schools. His parents died when he was a boy and he was bound out to a Mr. Jones, with whom he went to Buffalo when nine years of age. At the age of twelve he started in life for himself. He went to Bristol and there for a number of years worked by the month, and then bought the farm now owned by James Reed. Mr. Burge followed farming until 1873, when he went to Bristol Centre, and has since lived retired. He has been four times married; first to Ann, daughter of John Taylor, by whom he had four children: E. Whitefield, Victoria L., Ida A., and Lillian M. Mrs. Burge died May 6, 1858, and he married second Jane (Reed) Benedict, of Canandaigua, and had one child, Jennie L. The third wife of Mr. Burge was Ann M. Grovin, and the fourth Nellie M. Rodgers of Canandaigua. Mr. Burge is a Republican and voted for William Henry Harrison and also for his grandson, Benjamin. Mr. Burge is a member of the M. E. Church, of which he was class leader and chorister many years. E. Whitefield Burge, was born in Bristol, June 7, 1845. December, 1863, he enlisted in Company H., Fourth New York Heavy Artillery, and served until September 26, 1865. He was in the following engagements: Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Po River, Tolopotomy Creek, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Hatcher's Run, Peeble's Farm, Southside Railroad, Five Forks, Clover Hill, Sullivan's Station, and Lee's Surrender, and was wounded at Petersburg. He graduated from Canandaigua Academy in 1872, and then followed teaching and the mercantile business until 1881. He then discontinued teaching and became a pension attorney. In 1876 he married Lillian, one of four children of Joseph /A. and Charlott (Wilcox) Allen. Mr. and Mrs. Burge have four children: Allen R., Francis T., Carlton S., and Bessie. Mr. Burge is a Populist in politics, and has been justice of the peace fifteen years, town clerk two years, and justice of sessions one year.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Jean LaRue Burnett, was born January 10, 1871, in Canandaigua,  where he has since resided. He began his education in the Union School of that village, supplementing it with a course in the Canandaigua Academy where he prepared for college, graduating from the institution in 1889. He commenced the study of law and afterwards entered the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, by which institution he was graduated in 1892 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He early displayed journalistic and literary genius, and for several years has been a versatile contributor of both verse and prose to periodicals in every section of the United States, having been actively connected with numerous prominent journals in the capacity of general staff correspondent. Mr. Burnett has always been an enthusiastic Republican in politics and was one of the five originators of the scheme for the organization of the American Collegiate Republican League, with a membership of over 60,000, which gained national reputation for its influence exerted in the presidential campaign of 1892. He received the honor of being selected by the organization to act as toast master upon the occasion of its first annual banquet held at Ann Arbor on May 17, 1892, in honor of many distinguished guests among whom were General Russell A. Alger, of Michigan; Hon. J. Sloat Fassett, of New York; Hon. William McKinley of Ohio; Hon. John M. Thurston, of Nebraska; Hon. William E. Mason, of Illinois, and many others. It was upon this occasion that his eloquent introductory address and felicitous remarks in presenting the speakers bought him conspicuously to the notice of General Alger and Governor McKinley, and when the national campaign opened, upon the recommendation these gentlemen, the State Committee of New York appointed the subject of this sketch one of its regular speakers, and during the canvas he delivered addresses in various parts of the State, gaining a name as an orator of marked ability. He was the youngest speaker upon the stump in New York during this campaign. He was examined before the Supreme Court of Michigan and admitted to practice January 15, 1892. He was admitted to the bar of New York March 30, 1893.



From The Story of Geneva; compiled by E. Thayles Emmons; 1931;

Thomas Burrall, born in New Canaan, Conn. June 2, 1786; became a resident of Geneva in 1812; died June 24, 1872. He resided on a farm just outside the limits of the village on the north side of North street; was largely engaged in the iron foundry business on the west side of Exchange near Lewis street. He was one of the incorporators of the Geneva Academy.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Burrell, Edward, Seneca, was born on his grandfather's homestead, upon which he resides, near Hall's Corners, April 29, 1825.  He was educated in the schools of his day and has followed farming.  June 7, 1869, he married Elizabeth Parker of Oswego, Kendall county, Ill., and they have two sons:  Edward P. and Thomas W., both well educated and farmers with their father.  Mr. Burrell's father, Thomas, was born in Northumberland, England, in 1796, and came to the United States with his father when he was four years old, locating here in September, 1800.  His mother was dead.  He was educated in the schools of that early day, was a farmer, and married Mary Hall, formerly of England, coming here in 1801.  They had seven children, five now living:  Elizabeth, who married Alexander Turnbull, Edward, Catherine A., who married John C. Wilson; Margaret, died; Roger H., who married Barbara Kennedy, and resides in Monroe county; and Thomas D., who married Violet A. Dixon, also resides in Monroe county, and Mary Jane, dead.  Mr. Burrell's grandfather, Edward, was born at the old homestead in England, September 15, 1763.  He has married twice, first Elizabeth Dixon, by whom he had two children, Thomas and Margaret.  She died in England and he married second, Deborah Wood of Hall's Corners, and had three children:  Jane, Dorothy and Catherine.  Mr. Burrell's father was one of the elders in the Presbyterian church at Seneca.  Both himself and wife are members of the same church.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

T. J. Burrell and George, proprietors of Shepherd's Mill at East Bloomfield, came from near Toronto, Canada. In 1870 they purchased the property where they now live, and have since carried on a very successful business. They use the roller process, and the capacity of the mill is forty barrels a day. They do a large business in exchange and feed grinding. George Burrell was born in Canada, and after coming to East Bloomfield married Lydia Dibble, a native of that place and daughter of Alanson Dibble. To Mr. Burrell and wife were born one son and one daughter: George A. and Marcia A. The latter died at the age of four years. George A. is at present attending the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary. Mrs. Burrell and son are members of the M. E. church. Mr. Burrell enlisted in One Hundred and Eighth New York Volunteers in 1862, and after serving about two years received his discharge on account of disability. He and his brother, T. J., are Republicans.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Burtis, Charles B., Phelps, was born in New York city, February 17, 1825, a son of Arthur and Elizabeth (Palmer) Burtis.  The grandfather was John Burtis of Long Island. He was for twelve years superintendent at Bellevue Hospital, and drew the plans and superintended the work on the first building on Blackwell's Island. Charles B. married, October 6, 1846, Catharine Grange, sister of General Gordon Grange. They had four children:  Arthur B., Emma J., Henry B., and Clara T., wife of Rev. C. F. Porter. Henry B. was born at Oaks' Corners, July 29, 1860. He is the managing partner of the A. B. Curtis & Bro. Fruit and stock farm at Oaks' Corners. The buildings were erected in 1887, and are a credit to the town as well as to the proprietors. They have about thirty head of horses and colts, and their enterprise is in a flourishing condition.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Osband T. Bush, Canandaigua, was born in Barrington, Yates county, February 1, 1829. His father, Cornelius T., was a native of Ulster county, and when subject was but ten years of age his parents moved into Ontario county, locating in Canadice. He assisted on his father's farm until twenty-one years of age, when he took his father's farm to work on shares for a number of years. In 1857 he bought a farm in Canadice, and has since owned different farms. In 1867 he move to Grass Lake, Jackson county, Mich., where he bought a farm of 140 acres, and conducted it for thirteen years. While there he was a trustee of the Methodist church.  He returned to Ontario county in April, 1879, and bought his present farm in Canandaigua. He has since sold thirty acres, and the balance has set out to grapes, peaches and pears. In 1892 he shipped sixty six tons of grapes. The most of Mr. Bush's immense crop is shipped to Boston, although a market can be found in almost any city. He married in 1850 Phoebe Ann Jackman of Canadice, and they had four children: Luva, wife of Scott Winfield, of Michigan; Esther, wife of Albert Lucas, of Canandaigua; Scott Bush, of Canandaigua; and Carrie, wife of McClellan Townsend, of Canandaigua. Mrs. Bush died 1872, and he afterwards married Lucy, daughter of Edward Low, of Yates county, and they have had two daughters, Janie E. and Sarah Addie, students in Lima Seminary.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Peter L. Bush, Geneva, was born in Bergen county, N. J., May 22, 1794, and his wife, Eleanor Visher Denniston, was born on Long Island, October 29, 1811. Peter L. Bush came to Seneca county at an early day, where his first wife died, and thereafter, March 22, 1838, he married Eleanor V. Denniston, as is above stated. The children of the second marriage were: Alexander H., who was soldier in the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth N. Y. Vols., and who was taken prisoner in July, 1862, but after being exchanged he died November 6, 1862, at Camp Douglass, Chicago, Ill.; Hannah Louisa, who married first, Dr. Andrew Alleman, and second, Martin B. Romaine; and Carrie E., who became the wife of Ashland C. Wheeler. Peter L. Bush was a substantial and successful farmer. He went to Geneva in the spring of 1863, where he afterward lived a retired life to the time of his death, June 2, 1878. His wife died March 7, 1890. Captain Ashland C. Wheeler enlisted in August, 1861; was sergeant in Company E, Ninety-seventh Vols., but for meritorious services was appointed second lieutenant August 20, 1863, and thence to captain of Company B, December 1, 1864. He was discharged July 18, 1865. He was a successful merchant for nine years. He married Carrie E. Wheeler April 16, 1873, and died January 24, 1884.



From Victor Herald 30 March 1900

William Bushnell was born June 30, 1776, four days before the Declaration of Independence, and lived with his father on a farm in Sheffield, Mass., until about 1816, when hearing favorable reports of what was then known as the "Genesee country," he purchased a horse and saddle and rode to Bloomfield. In looking about for business, he found an opportunity of selling and putting in carding machinery, which he worked at for some time and returned to his old home in Massachusetts to make a visit and pay for his horse and saddle, which he had purchased on trust. When he returned to Bloomfield he concluded to engage in the mercantile business in Victor, where he thought there was a good opening for that kind of business, against the wishes and advice of his friends in Bloomfield, as Victor, at that time, had a hard reputation, many of the residents in the village and vicinity being tough characters. He disregarded their kind councils, however, and opened business with a salable line of goods, and was the first permanent merchant in town, although some goods had been previously sold. He prospered in business after a little time took his clerk, Nathan Jenks, into partnership, and to whom he afterwards sold the business. Mr. Bushnell at one time ran a distillery in Victor village, which was located where E. E. Lovejoy's house now stands. After a time a noted temperance advocate came to Victor and convinced Mr. Bushnell of the evils of the liquor traffic when he closed up the distillery, and the building stood there until it went to decay and was pulled down. Mr. Bushnell, with others, engaged in business in Bushnell's Basin, then quite a commercial point on the canal, selling goods and dealing in farm produce, both at that place and at the mouth of the Genesee river, at the same time running a line of boats on the canal. Mr. Bushnell was a careful business man, saving his accumulations, and at the time of his death, January 15, 1846, was considered a wealthy man. He left one child, a daughter, who afterwards became the wife of D. H. Osborne, of this village.



From the HISTORY OF ONTARIO COUNTY; compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; edited by George S. Conover; 1893;

Butler, W. K., Geneva, son of William M., was born in Covert, Seneca county, June 26, 1850. He received a common school education, and when fifteen years old went to learn the carpenter's trade. In 1878 he commenced contracting and building, drawing his own plans. He now employs twenty-five hands, and has a sash and blind and planing factory. He built the Western Hose Company's building, and has done some of the building at Willard Asylum. He has taught sixteen terms of school. In 1872 he married Cornelia, daughter of Theodore Swan, and has four children.



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